The Data Day: January 13, 2017

Totally made up facts by sleazebag data and analytics operatives – FAKE NEWS!

And that’s the data day, today.

NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index – An Interesting Occasional Update

I was recently prompted by OrientDB CEO Luca Garulli to take another look at the NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index, which we previously updated on a regular basis between September 2012 and 2015.

I wouldn’t read too much into the results since there’s been such a long period between updates, and this is – as ever – just a snapshot of one particular data source. However, they are definitely interesting, especially when you consider that we retired the NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index primarily because the results had become so boringly predictable.

As such I’d make the following observations without any additional comment:

  • It is interesting to note that MongoDB’s share of mentions of NoSQL databases in LinkedIn member profiles has declined since September 2015, from 51% to 48%. Of course, MongoDB remains the number one by a considerable margin.
  • It is also interesting to note that Redis has climbed above Cassandra to claim second spot.
  • Similarly it is interesting that Neo4j has climbed above CouchDB for fifth place.
  • And it is also interesting that DynamoDB has overtaken Couchbase for eighth place.
  • It is also interesting that the two fastest growing NoSQL databases, in terms of mentions in LinkedIn profiles, are Google Cloud Bigtable (up 557%) and Azure DocumentDB (up 254%).
  • And it is also interesting that the third fastest growth came from RethinkDB, despite the recent demise of the company of the same name.
  • Those growth rates saw Google Clooud Bigtable climb above Voldemort, ArangoDB, Hypertable and Allegrograph, while Azure DocumentDB climbed above Titan and Voldemort, and RethinkDB climbed above Titan and Accumulo.

Since Luca prompted another look at the results, I should also probably point out that mentions of OrientDB grew at a healthy 83% as OrientDB held on to 11th place in the Index.

Interesting…

The Data Day: June 10, 2016

What happened in data and analytics this week will make your jaw drop.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: March 19-April 1, 2016

Funding for Domo, Cockroach Labs, MapD and data Artisans. And more

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: June 1-12, 2015

Teradata supports Presto. And more

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: November 1-7 2014

Paxata refreshes data preparation service. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: October 11 – October 17 2014

Insanely large Strata-Hadoop World edition

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: August 22 – September 5 2014

Teradata acquires Think Big. DataStax raises $106m. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: April 18-25 2014

Informatica, QlikTech and Pivotal Q1 results. And more

And that’s the data day, today.

7 Hadoop questions. Q2: Hadoop infrastructure choices

What is your preferred infrastructure for Hadoop deployments? That’s one of the primary questions being asked in the 451 Research 2013 Hadoop survey. The answer will have significant implications for the future direction of Hadoop.

hadoop-elephant

While one of the primary benefits of Hadoop – low cost data storage – means that for many organisations the primary infrastructure for Hadoop has been commodity hardware, many systems and storage vendors now offer their own dedicated appliances and/or reference architecture for Hadoop.

We expect to see more of these dedicated Hadoop configurations as the incumbent infrastructure vendors look to cash-in on Hadoop adoption and try to add greater value.

We also see some companies exploring the potential for Hadoop in the cloud, as well as hosted deployments, and on virtual infrastructure – although those are arguably in the early stages of technical maturity, and adoption.

survey

Which infrastructure configurations are most popular? That’s one of the things our survey is designed to find out. The early results perhaps unsurprisingly indicate a greater preference for Hadoop being deployed on commodity hardware. However, cloud and virtual deployments have also scored well.

Interestingly, the early results show the preference for Hadoop on cloud infrastructure is significantly higher among respondents that are still in the development and test stage with Hadoop, which supports our anecdotal evidence about the use-cases for Hadoop in the cloud.

In order to get a little more detail on deployment preferences, the survey also asks about the level of consideration, testing and adoption for dedicated Hadoop hardware and Hadoop-as-a-service offerings respectively.

Among the choices in the dedicated hardware category are offerings from DataDirect Networks, Dell, HP, Oracle, IBM, Pivotal, Teradata, Cisco and NetApp.

The choices in the Hadoop-as-a-service category include Altiscale, Amazon EMR (including MapR), MapR on Google Compute Engine, Microsoft Windows Azure HDInsight Service, Mortar Data, Qubole, Rackspace Big Data, SunGard Unified Analytics Services and Treasure Data.

To give your view on this and other questions related to the adoption of Hadoop, please take our 451 Research 2013 Hadoop survey.