NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index – An Interesting Occasional Update

I was recently prompted by OrientDB CEO Luca Garulli to take another look at the NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index, which we previously updated on a regular basis between September 2012 and 2015.

I wouldn’t read too much into the results since there’s been such a long period between updates, and this is – as ever – just a snapshot of one particular data source. However, they are definitely interesting, especially when you consider that we retired the NoSQL LinkedIn Skills Index primarily because the results had become so boringly predictable.

As such I’d make the following observations without any additional comment:

  • It is interesting to note that MongoDB’s share of mentions of NoSQL databases in LinkedIn member profiles has declined since September 2015, from 51% to 48%. Of course, MongoDB remains the number one by a considerable margin.
  • It is also interesting to note that Redis has climbed above Cassandra to claim second spot.
  • Similarly it is interesting that Neo4j has climbed above CouchDB for fifth place.
  • And it is also interesting that DynamoDB has overtaken Couchbase for eighth place.
  • It is also interesting that the two fastest growing NoSQL databases, in terms of mentions in LinkedIn profiles, are Google Cloud Bigtable (up 557%) and Azure DocumentDB (up 254%).
  • And it is also interesting that the third fastest growth came from RethinkDB, despite the recent demise of the company of the same name.
  • Those growth rates saw Google Clooud Bigtable climb above Voldemort, ArangoDB, Hypertable and Allegrograph, while Azure DocumentDB climbed above Titan and Voldemort, and RethinkDB climbed above Titan and Accumulo.

Since Luca prompted another look at the results, I should also probably point out that mentions of OrientDB grew at a healthy 83% as OrientDB held on to 11th place in the Index.

Interesting…

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Our 2013 Database survey is now live

451 Research’s 2013 Database survey is now live at http://bit.ly/451db13 investigating the current use of database technologies, including MySQL, NoSQL and NewSQL, as well as traditional relation and non-relational databases.

The aim of this survey is to identify trends in database usage, as well as changing attitudes to MySQL following its acquisition by Oracle, and the competitive dynamic between MySQL and other databases, including NoSQL and NewSQL technologies.

There are just 15 questions to answer, spread over five pages, and the entire survey should take less than ten minutes to complete.

All individual responses are of course confidential. The results will be published as part of a major research report due during Q2.

The full report will be available to 451 Research clients, while the results of the survey will also be made freely available via a
presentation at the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo in April.

Last year’s results have been viewed nearly 55,000 times on SlideShare so we are hoping for a good response to this year’s survey.

One of the most interesting aspects of a 2012 survey results was the extent to which MySQL users were testing and adopting PostgreSQL. Will that trend continue or accelerate in 2013? And what of the adoption of cloud-based database services such as Amazon RDS and Google Cloud SQL?

Are the new breed of NewSQL vendors having any impact on the relational database incumbents such as Oracle, Microsoft and IBM? And how is SAP HANA adoption driving interest in other in-memory databases such as VoltDB and MemSQL?

We will also be interested to see how well NoSQL databases fair in this year’s survey results. Last year MongoDB was the most popular, followed by Apache Cassandra/DataStax and Redis. Are these now making a bigger impact on the wider market, and what of Basho’s Riak, CouchDB, Neo4j, Couchbase et al?

Additionally, we have been tracking attitudes to Oracle’s ownership of MySQL since the deal to acquire Sun was announced. Have MySQL users’ attitudes towards Oracle improved or declined in the last 12 months, and what impact will the formation of the MariaDB Foundation have on MariaDB adoption?

We’re looking forward to analyzing the results and providing answers to these and other questions. Please help us to get the most representative result set by taking part in the survey at http://bit.ly/451db13

Update on the relative popularity of NoSQL database skills

Back in December we ran a series of posts looking at the geographic distribution of NoSQL skills, according to the results of searching LinkedIn member profiles, culminating in a look at the relative overall popularity of the major NoSQL databases.

This week I took another look at LinkedIn to update the results for a forthcoming report, which gives us the opportunity to see how the results have changed over the past quarter:

While this provides us with an interesting opportunity to track LinkedIn profile mentions over time there isn’t a huge amount we can learn from this first update – other than that MongoDB seems to be increasing its dominance.

The only significant change that isn’t immediately obvious from looking at the chart is that Apache HBase has overtaken Apache CouchDB by a tiny margin to claim third place overall.

As we noted last time, however, Apache HBase is more reliant on the US than other NosQL databases for its LinkedIn mentions: it is the second most prevalent NoSQL database mentioned in the USA but fourth in the rest of the world.

Two other points to take into consideration:

– The results for Apache Cassandra are probably disproportionately low since we have to search for the full phrase in order to avoid including people called Cassandra.

– Previously we only searched for Membase. This time we added together the search results for both Membase and Couchbase. This may mean the result for Couch/Membase is disproportionately high since some members probably listed both.

This is not meant to be a comprehensive analysis, however, but rather a snapshot of one particular data source.

The geographic distribution of NoSQL skills – just one more thing

Hidden away amongst the details of our little tour around LinkedIn statistics on NoSQL and Hadoop skills was some interesting information on how many LinkedIn members list the various data management technologies in our sample in their profiles.

Our original post contained the fact that there were 9,079 LinkedIn members with “Hadoop” in their member profiles, for example, compared to 366,084 with “MySQL” in their member profiles.

Later posts showed there were 170 with “Membase” and 1,687 with “HBase”, 787 with “Apache Cassandra” and 376 with “Riak”, 6,048 with “MongoDB” and 2,152 with “Redis”, and finally, 1,844 with “CouchDB” and 268 with “Neo4j”.

This gives us an interesting perspective on the relative adoption of the various NoSQL databases:

If it wasn’t already obvious from the list above, the chart illustrates just how much more prevalent MongoDB skills are compared to the other NoSQL databases, followed by Redis, Apache CouchDB, Apache HBase and Apache Cassandra. The chart also illustrates that while HBase is the second most prevalent NoSQL skill set in the USA, it is only fourth overall given its lower prevalence in the rest of the world.

In response, a representative from a certain vendor notes “Some skills are more valued not because they are more prevalent, but because they are harder to achieve.” Make of that what you will.