The Data Day, A few days: May 14-20, 2016

Funding for ThoughtSpot and AtScale. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: October 18 – October 31 2014

VMware acquires Continuent. IBM launches dashDB. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: June 26-28 2013

Hortonworks raises $50m, previews next-generation Hadoop. And more

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, A few days: April 22-26 2013

Pivotal launches. SkySQL and Mony Program merge. And much, much more

The Data Day, A few days: March 29-April 8 2013

Tableau preps IPO. Funding for SiSense and Deep. And more.

* For 451 Research clients: Citus Data brings SQL to foreign data environments, starting with Hadoop

* For 451 Research clients: With $20m in series B funding in the bag, Platfora makes its Hadoop-based analysis debut

* Tableau Software Files Registration Statement For Proposed Initial Public Offering.

* SiSense raises $10m series B funding.

* Deep Information Sciences scores $10M for its general-purpose database.

* IBM launches BLU Acceleration, PureData System for Hadoop.

* SAP: Is HANA growth overstated?

* VMWare announces the launch of Serengeti 0.8.0.

* MySQL and the forks in the road.

The Data Day, Two days: February 15/18 2013

Redshift goes GA. Pivotal’s Google in a box. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, Two days: February 13/14 2013

TempoDB’s timely DBaaS for the Internet of Things. ScaleBase 2.0. And more

And that’s the data day, today.

The Data Day, Two days: February 7/8 2013

Teradata results. Funding for DataXu. The chemistry of data. And more.

And that’s the data day, today.

Cloud databases, or database on the cloud?

As 2012 came to a close I tweeted

NuoDB has today kicked off that debate with the launch of its Cloud Data Management System and 12 rules for a 21st century cloud database.

NuoDB’s 12 rules appear pretty sound to me – in fact you could argue they are somewhat obvious. This is actually to NuoDB’s credit in my opinion, in that they haven’t simply listed 12 differentiating aspects of their product, but 12 broader requirements.

Either way, I believe that this is the right time to be debating what constitutes a “cloud database”. Database on the cloud are nothing new, but these are existing relational database products configured to run on the cloud.

In other words, they are databases on the cloud, not databases of the cloud. There is a significant difference between spinning up a relational database in a VMI on the cloud versus deploying a database designed to take advantage of, enable, and be part of, the cloud.

To me, a true cloud database would be one designed to take advantage of and enable elastic, distributed architecture. NuoDB is one of those, but it won’t be the only one. Many NoSQL databases could also make a claim, albeit not for SQL and ACID workloads.

This isn’t a matter of SQL versus NoSQL, however. We’ve seen companies building their own next-generation database platforms deploying NoSQL and SQL technologies alongside each other for different workload and consistency requirements. Where the SQL layer falls down is the inability of existing relational databases to support elastic, geographically distributed cloud environments.

NuoDB believes it has a solution to that. So too do others including GenieDB, Translattice and VMware. Meanwhile Google’s F1 and Spanner projects have legitimized the concept of the globally-distributed SQL database.

Either way, the era of the relational cloud database – rather than the relational database on the cloud – has begun.

The Data Day, Two days: December 18/19 2012

GenieDB, Qubole, EdgeSpring, CouchDB, and more

And that’s the Data Day, today.