Open source ushers mobile OS changes

The year is starting out with what may turn out to be significant changes in the mobile operating system market, with open source software playing a significant role just as it has in enterprise software, virtualization and cloud computing.

With fading heavyweights and interesting new challengers, there are changes afoot in the mobile OS market, but we must first acknowledge the market today is still mainly a duopoly of Apple with iOS and Samsung with Android.

However, if we look back five years, we see how dramatically the mobile OS landscape has changed. Given the pace of today’s device and application development and support, as well as users from consumers to the enterprise, we can expect similarly dramatic changes in the coming months and years.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

Mixed signals in IT’s great war over IP

Recent news that Microsoft and Barnes & Noble agreed to partner on the Nook e-reader line rather than keep fighting over intellectual property suggests the prospect of more settlement and fewer IP suits in the industry. However, the deal further obscures the blurry IP and patent landscape currently impacting both enterprise IT and consumer technology.

It is good to see settlement — something I’ve been calling for, while also warning against patent and IP aggression. However, this settlment comes from the one conflict in this ongoing war that was actually shedding some light on the matter, rather than further complicating it.

See the full article at TechNewsWorld.

Open Source Coopetition Fueled by LF Growth

The Linux Foundation has come a long way since initiated in 2007 as the fusion of the Open Source Development Lab (OSDL) and Free Standards Group. At its start, I wondered why there was no membership or representation from Canonical, which was the hottest thing in Linux at the time.

Today, Canonical is a member of the Linux Foundation and the
organization continues to grow in its core of system software and Linux as well as in mobile devices and, more recently, the automotive industry — among my predictions for Linux strength in 2012.

The Linux Foundation has also gained some significant members and new groups of collaborators — the latest batch including graphics and microprocessor giant Nvidia.

Read the full story at LinuxInsider.

2012 to be year of Linux domination

Previously, I’ve called out years for non-desktop Linux in 2008, Linux in both the low and high-ends of the market in 2009, ‘hidden’ Linux in 2010 and last year, cloud computing in 2011. For 2012, I see continued growth, prevalence, innovation and impact from Linux, thus leading to a 2012 that is dominated by Linux.

I expect to see nothing but continued strength for Linux and open source in cloud computing in 2012. The cloud continues to be the biggest disruptor and opportunity for Linux providers. 2012 got off to an interesting start with Microsoft’s efforts to support for Linux on Azure, which highlights just how pervasive Linux has become in cloud computing. As detail in our special report on The Changing Linux Landscape, we also expect Linux to continue to be the basis for most offerings in IaaS and particularly PaaS, which is burgeoning across open source languages and frameworks as well as verticals and enterprise customers. Its popularity among enterprise and other developers will also bolster Linux and open source software in 2012.

We can certainly expect to see Linux continue its domination in supercomputing and the Top 500 Supercomputer List, where Linux continues to grow its share above 90% while others, such as Microsoft, Apple and BSD, fall off of the list.

I also expect Linux will grow its presence and impact on the wider, more mainstream server market, where Red Hat and SUSE continue to benefit from Unix migration, particularly from Solaris. Our analysis with survey data from 451 Research division TheInfoPro shows server spending for databases and data warehousing favoring Red Hat with Linux over Oracle with either Linux or Solaris. Out of more than 165 server professionals interviewed by TIP, 67% are planning to spend more with Red Hat on database/data-warehousing, and only 6% plan to spend less. The positive figures for Red Hat mirror negative spending intentions for Oracle, with 55% planning to spend less and only 9% planning to spend more. Spending continues to decline strongly for all of the primary Unix providers in the study, which in addition to Oracle includes IBM and Hewlett-Packard.

We may also see further expansion for Red Hat, which may be eyeing key acquisitions, and other Linux and open source vendors as they continue building their channels and wade more into midmarket and SMB customers.

In smartphones and mobile software, I also expect Linux will do quite well in 2012 with continued Android strength, diminished FUD and possibly an open source boost from a newly-open sourced WebOS. We also see Ubuntu arriving on the mobile and converged device scene, including ‘concept’ appearance at CES.

We’re also likely to see Linux in automobiles, health care and other electronics even more in 2012, though you may never hear Linux or open source. Don’t be fooled though, Linux is expanding its already impressive, wide presence and 2012 looks to be another year of significant gains.

WebOS and the open alternative live another day

There has been no shortage of reaction to HP’s move to make the Linux-based WebOS open source software. Below, I offer some of my thoughts on the meaning for the different players affected.

*What’s it mean for WebOS?
Moving WebOS to open source was best option for HP. It retains some value in the software depending on its involvement. It is also the best fate for the code, rather then being sold or simmered to its IP and patent value or even used as another weapon in the ongoing mobile software patent wars. Still, the move comes amid huge developer and consumer uncertainty for WebOS. Nevertheless, at least WebOS was already in the market with a compelling products, the Palm the Pre, in the modern smartphone market. WebOS will hopefully have a faster path to open source than Symbian since the former is based on Linux. I still think the greatest opportunity for WebOS may be in serving as an open alternative in the market, particularly after Android has proven to handset makers, wireless carriers, OEMs and others that a Linux-based, open source mobile OS can succeed in the market and provide profit for multiple parties. Furthering this opportunity, WebOS may be even more attractive to these key vendors, channel players and other stakeholders who are tired of the IP and patent stress and expense around Android. Of course, Android was not under patent or IP attack until it was successful in the market and the same may be the case for WebOS, though we think its IP roots and history in touch and smartphone technology are less complex in terms of origin and ownership.

*What’s it mean for competitors?
For Apple, an open source WebOS means more market pressure and open pressure, more competition for developers and a real danger WebOS hooks into the Android ecosystem. WebOS may also be harder to attack from a patent and IP standpoint since it is older and more singular in ownership (Palm and now HP). Other factors include HP’s own formidable patent portfolio and the perception of Apple as a patent aggressor, which would be reinforced if it attacked WebOS the way it has gone after Android.

For Android, it may finally get a dose of its own open medicine, feeling the pressure of another Linux-based, open source mobile OS that is familiar to many developers, compatible with newer smartphone technologies and appealing to handset makers and other key OEMs. However, WebOS is also a validation of Android, which paved the path for mobile Linux and open source to finally break through beyond geeks to reach a mass consumer audience.

As for other proprietary players such as Microsoft and RIM, another open source rival is bad news. It presents another open source option and potentially serious competition on developers, applications, devices, carriers and consumers. An open source WebOS may also make Android, in effect, more open with faster, easier access to code for both Android and WebOS compete. This could make it even harder for these older, proprietary players to get developer or consumer mind share that is already slipping.

*What’s it mean for open source? Really, there is no downside for open source except that it will be viewed as a form of software cemetery if WebOS is not developed or delivered to market. HP’s WebOS move does give open source greater prominence in mobile software. Again, it is a validation of Android, which is Linux-based and open source, and shows that we haven’t seen the last of mobile Linux and open source software in Android.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.10.28

Topics for this podcast:

*Opscode Chef extends to Windows for more enterprise devops
*Black Duck continues growth, gains new funding
*Cloudant expands NoSQL database focus, customers
*New open source Web server and vendor Nginx arrives
*The downside of Microsoft’s Android dollars

iTunes or direct download (27:35, 4.7MB)

New mobile Linux efforts reminiscent of old

Amid continued traction for Android, there have been a number of other developments for mobile operating systems based on Linux. Given my support for and belief in Linux and open source software, you might expect me to be bullish on the prospects for all of this mobile and device Linux. However, based on what I’ve seen in the past in terms of mergers, reshuffles and strategic restarts, I believe the introduction of the Tizen Linux-based OS is reminiscent of a time when mobile Linux wasn’t really moving ahead.

Almost three years ago, I wrote in 451 Group’s report,’Mobility Matters,’ that in spite of previous false starts and maneuvers — similar to the ones we’re seeing right now — mobile Linux and open source software were finally poised to break out of niche use. I saw potential in the LiMO Founation, Palm’s webOS, and particularly Android.

More recently came the introduction of Tizen. Though the Tizen project is backed by the Linux Foundation, the LiMO Foundation, and industry leaders including Intel and Samsung, it is a jolt to mobile Linux and open source developers since it effectively ends the MeeGo OS and project.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.07

OpenStack Foundation. New Pentaho CEO. And more.

# Rackspace announced its intention to form an independent OpenStack Foundation.

# HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system for its Public Cloud.

# Pentaho appointed Quentin Gallivan as its new CEO.

# Hortonworks continued the discussion about contributions to Apache Hadoop.

# Bob Bickel explained why CloudBees is not, itself, open source.

# Google announced the limited preview release of Google Cloud SQL.

# Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges joined the Linux Foundation.

# Dave Neary discussed the different types of community in relation to the Tizen project.

# Akamai joined the OpenStack community.

# Daniel Abadi provided his perspective on Oracle’s NoSQL Database.

# One more thing…
Apple’s relationship with open source may be somewhat tenuous – Paul Rooney provides some background – but given the impact Steve Jobs has made on the industry as a whole it seems wrong not to mark his passing in some way. We’ll leave the words to the company he created.

Heeding the lessons of SCO, or not

We recently saw what is being described as the ending of the seven-year-old SCO contract and intellectual property dispute that dragged Linux through the mud before it propelled the open source OS into much broader enterprise use and credibility.

You’d think the lessons of SCO would be a shining example for technology companies of what not to do in order to maintain leadership and relevance. Yet, today we see technology heavyweights such as Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), Oracle (Nasdaq: ORCL) and Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL) repeating some of the same mistakes that led SCO to ridicule and then ruin.

See full story at LinuxInsider.

The open card in the mobile game

I wrote last year about the way Google’s Android mobile operating system was serving as a more open alternative to Apple’s iOS, but not so open that it didn’t leave opportunity for an even more open alternative.

Given that we continue to see software patent-based attacks on Android, as well as swirling FUD around coverage of the attacks and never ending suits and settlements and courtroom developments, it is clear it will be a long time before any of this legal business is ever close to settled, unless ended by settlements first, which is likely.

However, I’m more interested in the technology in the meantime. I also think it’s interesting to see, if not a ‘more open’ alternative emerging, at least another, ‘somewhat open’ option in the tablet market, this being HP’s WebOS. It’s interesting that WebOS evolved from Palm, which HP acquired in March 2010 for $1.4 billion. Though Apple’s iPad is still the clear leader in tablets, it is interesting to see continuing signs that what happened in smartphones (where iPhone led and Android quickly caught up and then passed iOS) may be happening in tablets. There is also still the possibility that tablets may play out like netbooks, with wild popularity followed by a fade in favor of more traditional PCs for traditional PC needs. It is interesting to note that Google’s Eric Schmidt recently commented on the continued utility of PCs, which will remain key to professionals, consumers, and also developers, largely because of the tactical keyboard. What is most likely is continued convergence, and it will be interesting to see what ties emerge between WebOS and PCs as computer hardware giant HP rolls out the OS in tablets and smartphones.

We also see other signs that new, open entrants may be mixing things up in the mobile and converged device market, such as word of a possible Android and iOS competitor from Mozilla. There is yet another project that is already a factor in netbooks, other mobile devices and the burgeoning IT market of automobile information and entertainment systems, MeeGo, which is also open source. Even Research in Motion’s Playbook is based on the QNX operating system, for which source code was made available by its previous owner to make it more like the open source Linux OS, which was attracting developers and interesting customers.

We believed there was a fairly prominent place for open source software, open source operating systems and general openness in mobile software when we wrote our report, Mobility Matters three years ago, but we would have never guessed that the openness of this software would be so significant in two respects: defense from patent and other intellectual property attacks; the market power of open source, which draws in not only developers, but manufacturers and other third-parties. We’ve seen the speed and strength at which a project and community such as Android can grow. Will we now begin to see other alternatives that are even more open emerge as top choices among developers, hardware companies, wireless players and consumers? Never before have those alternatives really existed in the mobile software world, so it’s good at least to see the possibility is there.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.26

CloudBees raises $10.5m. Microsoft commits $100m to SUSE. And more.

# CloudBees secured $10.5m in Series B venture funding.

# Microsoft renewed its vows with Attachmate’s SUSE business unit, committing to invest $100m in new SUSE Linux Enterprise certificates over the next four years.

# Oracle announced that it has acquired Ksplice, twhioch offers zero downtime update technology for Linux.

# Ingres announced that Steve Shine has been named Chief Executive Officer and President.

# Dell unveiled the Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution.

# DotNetNuke announced the immediate availability of DotNetNuke 6

# SkySQL announced a partnership with Yoshinori Matsunobu, to provide technical support, professional services, and training for MySQL Master High Availability Manager and Tools (MySQL MHA).

# Oracle provided early access to new features being lined up for MySQL 5.6.

# Abiquo tripled its cloud management business in the first half of 2011.

# Black Duck grew sales 37% in Q2.

# Mark Shuttleworth discussed the responsibilities of [copyright] ownership.

# Linux 3.0 has been released.

# The Document Foundation provided an illustration of its developer community.

# GigaOm considered what it means if Hortonworks doesn’t do distribution.

# Postgres has replaced MySQL as the default database for Apple OS X.

# Gluster announced the beta release of GlusterFS 3.3.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.24

Red Hat posts Q1 results. USPTO disrupts Oracle’s patent claims.

# Red Hat announced first quarter revenue up 27% to $265m.

# The USPTO rejected 17 of 21 claims related to a patent Oracle is asserting against Google.

# Apple hit Amahi with a cease and desist letter related to its app store.

# The Eclipse Foundation announced the availability of Indigo, its 2011 annual release train.

# Red Hat released Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.0

# Microsoft is working with Joyent and the Node community to bring Node.js to Windows.

# Talend announced the availability of Talend ESB Studio Standard Edition and Talend ESB Enterprise Edition for Data Services and joined the JCP.

# Alfresco announced Alfresco Team for content collaboration.

# Savio Rodrigues discussed the growth or MongoDB into the enterprise.

# Pentaho released Pentaho BI 4 Enterprise Edition.

# Cloudera announced the general availability of its Cloudera Connector for IBM Netezza appliances.

# The Open Virtualization Alliance added 65 new members.

# Acunu released version one of the Acunu Data Platform.

# WSO2 added WSO2 Message Broker and WSO2 Complex Event Processing Server to its updated Carbon middleware platform.

# Nuxeo updated its Studio hosted customization and configuration environment.

# VoltDB announced the release of VoltDB Integration for Hadoop.

# Carlo Daffara discussed the economic value of open source software.

# Nokia and Accenture finalized the agreement for Nokia to outsource Symbian software development and support activities to Accenture.

# Dirk Riehle explained the open source big bang.

# Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols discussed five reasons Android can fail.

# Debian adopted LibreOffice.

Is Android FUD a forebearer of Linux-like success?

Time is flying by so fast, it sure doesn’t seem like it was last year I was blogging about how Android is for real. Well, let me reiterate … Android is for real. The reason I say that and stress that is despite its success, we see a variety of legal threats, accusations and actual lawsuits flying at Android as fast as it is growing in the market.

Still, we seem to be able to fairly easily find agreement among vendors, developers and users that Android development is not slowing down, that legal maneuvering will not pave a path to success or that any ruling or action will take Android-based phones out of consumers’ hands. This is not to say Android doesn’t face significant challenges: real fragmentation and version overload; a software development pace that may be too fast for handset makers or consumers; innovation from rivals such as Apple, HP, Research In Motion, Microsoft and others, including ones we may not yet be considering a threat, but which may find an improvement or refinement. This could be as simple as serving as the more open alternative.

I’ve seen some criticisms of Android and Google indicating it is clear or should be clear what is open source and what is not. I would argue, however, that is has become quite unclear what is open source and what is not in all circumstances and particularly in smartphones, as we covered in our special report Mobility Matters two-and-a-half long years ago. There’s no denying the constant pressure for Android and Google and others in the ecosystem to be true to the spirit and letter of open source and its licenses, however painful, serves to strengthen its open source aspects. However, the statements and signals crying foul against Android are quite similar to the complaints, threats and, yes, FUD we saw swirling around Linux a decade ago. And let’s not forget the lesson of open enough, which becomes even more significant given cloud computing and the capabilities it is extending to smartphones and other mobile devices.

Bottom line, developers, handset manufacturers and consumers are heavily more focused on new releases every six months than who is suing whom in the IP infringement claim game and software patent ‘system.’ To predict where Android is headed and what is likely to happen as a result of the FUD, we can look at Linux, which emerged stronger, more competitive and more enterprise-ready after the infamous SCO threats and lawsuits.

I have no fear that Android development and innovation will slow down as a result of legal claims, suits or threats. I have no uncertainty that new features, functionality, applications and development will be the drivers in the market and I have no doubt that the companies, cash and consumers on the line will keep things incredibly interesting over the next several years. No FUD here. Nothing to see, move on.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.25

UK Govt goes big on open source. DotNetNuke acquires Active Modules. And more.

# This week the UK Government confirmed that it really is serious about open source software adoption. Mark Taylor reported from the UK Cabinet Office’s Open Source System Integrator Forum, while ComputerWeekly rounded up the latest changes to the UK government ‘s strategy for open source.

# DotNetNuke acquired social collaboration solutions provider Active Modules.

# Acunu raised $3.6m in series A funding for its Apache Cassandra-based data storage software.

# Canonical and Banshee agreed to disagree on music store revenue.

# SAP’s HANA appliance runs SUSE Linus Enterprise Server.

# Vaadin released a Vaadin Pro subscription with set of commercial tools, components and support.

# Oracle Technology Network published an article on using Berkeley DB as a NoSQL data store.

# Quest Software is sponsoring the Sudo project.

# LINBIT’s DRBD replication software is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

# Marten Mickos discussed how open source impacts company culture.

# Openbravo introduced “Agile ERP” with Openbravo 3.

# The Chemistry open source implementation of CMIS is now a top level Apache project.

# The first release of Spring Gemfire integration is now generally available.

# Sencha introduced PhiloGL, an open source WebGL framework.

# A project has been started to create a Qt implementation for Android.

# Karmasphere updated its Studio and Analyst development and analytics products for Hadoop.

# Andy Updegrove discussed best practices in open source foundation governance.

# arstechnica explained why Microsoft was right to ban GPL apps from its app store, and why Apple should do the same.

# Yahoo plans to release its internal cloud computing engine using as open source license.

Tablet fight shaping up as smartphone repeat

Here we go again. Apple is not only leaving opportunity for more open alternatives, it is dismissing the competition, which it apparently thinks either does not or should not exist.

While Apple may be calling its Android-based competition vapor, bizarre or otherwise unmagical, we nonetheless are getting the same signals we did when Android arrived on the smartphone scene a few years ago. First, advertising and marketing campaigns are not limited to Apple’s devices and now include aggressive strategies around Android for smartphones and, such as the case with the new Android-powered Samsung Galaxy Tab, for tablets. Second, there are a number of significant, powerful and yes, innovative companies that are working on Android devices, strategies, applications and other content. In fact, Android tablets will most certainly benefit from Android smartphones the same way Apple’s iPad and community have benefited from the solid base created with the iPhone. In addition, there is a much broader range of Android devices, including devices that are more specialized, more expensive or, of course, less expensive (I saw an ad for a $110 Android tablet device in the newspaper recently).

Another important signal: developer love for Android. While Apple no doubt continues to attract attention, development, commercial opportunity and market, Android is also identified as a fast-growing ecosystem and a prime target for device makers, developers and ISVs, marketers and others.

All of this means that, just as we saw with Android in the smartphone market, there may be underestimated challenges(451 subscribers) for Apple in tablets, including Android-based devices and the likes of the RIM PlayBook and MeeGo OS.

While netbooks continue to go niche, I also think there is much more promise and potential for Android to power other devices — including netooks. While I joked a couple of years ago about Android going on toasters, it is seriously making inroads among a broad range of electronics and systems manufacturers from all over the world. One of the latest uses of Android: powering a space satellite.

With Android popping up in all of these places, I find it doubtful it will not be significant in tablets, as it has been in smartphones.

451 CAOS Links 2010.12.17

CPTN Holdings unmasked. Oracle updates MySQL. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Florian Mueller reported that the Novell patent acquiring CPTN Holdings is Microsoft, Apple, EMC and Oracle.

# The VAR Guy told the (previously) untold story of Novell’s sale to Attachmate.

# Attachmate committed to support the existing roadmaps and release schedules for Novell and SUSE products.

# Oracle announced that MySQL 5.5 is now generally available.

# Oracle announced Oracle Cloud Office and Oracle Open Office 3.3.

# ComputerWeekly published a nice round-up of the FSFE’s challenge to the EC’s SACHA II contract.

# The FSFE welcomed the revised European Interoperability Framework.

# Mesos (resource sharing for cluster apps inc Hadoop) has been proposed as an Apache incubator project.

# Jive announced the new Jive Apps SDK beta and plans to contribute parts of it as OSS.

# FuseSource launched a new enterprise subscription offering for Apache CXF.

# Rackspace acquired (OSS-based) cloud-server management provider Cloudkick.

# Red Hat announced the general availability of JBoss Enterprise Portal Platform 5.1.

# David Nuescheler and Bertrand Delacretaz assessed the impact of the ASF leaving the JCP.

# Percona added HandlerSocket to its Percona Server MySQL distribution.

# Talend provided initial details on its data integration product roadmap following the acquisition of SOPERA.

# Magento claimed year-on-year growth of almost 250%.

451 CAOS Links 2010.11.12

Talend raises $34m, acquires Sopera. Red Hat releases RHEL 6. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Talend raised $34m funding and acquired Sopera.

# Twilio raised $12m in series B funding.

# Red Hat released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.

# Savio Rodrigues noted a change in emphasis from Red Hat to focus on value, rather than cost.

# Joyent officially became the new home for Node.js.

# Groklaw covered Google’s response to Oracle’s amended legal claims.

# Oracle clarified its JVM Strategy.

# Oracle clarified some issues about MySQL pricing and licensing changes.

# Ian Skerrett shared his view on the changing nature of open source companies.

# Oracle and Apple announced an OpenJDK Project for Mac OS X.

# CouchOne explained why it is moving away from NoSQL.

# ActiveState grew sales 43% in the third quarter of 2010.

# OTRS announced a strategic partnership with GroundWork Open Source.

# GridGain released version 3.0 of its cloud application platform.

# Xyratex acquired Peter Braam’s Clusterstor and hired Peter Bojanic to lead the company’s Lustre initiative.

451 CAOS Links 2010.11.02

JCP election results. Funding for Acquia and Continuent. Fedora 14. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# The Java Community Process election results are in.

# Acquia closed an $8.5m series C funding round and announced that it has tripled its customer base in 2010.

# Continuent appointed Robert Hodges CEO and confirmed details of $5m funding from Aura Capital.

# Red Hat announced the availability of Fedora 14.

# Apple filed two patent infringement lawsuits against Motorola in relation to Android.

# Carlo Daffara updated his analysis of the Java code Oracle claims was copied into Android.

# An open letter to the JCP Executive Committee calling for JCP reform.

# Jono Bacon provided some clarification on Canonical’s Unity plans.

# Informatica partnered with Cloudera to enable integration with Hadoop.

# Andy Updegrove discussed the lessons developers can learn from OpenOffice and Java.

# Jaspersoft claimed 100 cloud BI customer deployments.

# Symbian is set to receive investment of over €22m from the EC’s Artemis project.

# Stormy Peters is stepping down as executive director of the Gnome Foundation to join Mozilla.

# Coverity announced the results of the Coverity Scan 2010 Open Source Integrity Report.

# James Dixon explained the difficulty in comparing open source and proprietary software markets.

# More than 30 OpenOffice,org developers have resigned from the project.

# The Eclipse Foundation announced Eclipse Virgo 2.1, a light-weight application server for OSGi applications.

# The Motley Fool’s Seth Jayson examined Red Hat’s cash flow.

# The November issue of the Open Source Business Resource is now available.

# RightScale’s Private Cloud Early Access Program supports deploying private clouds using Cloud.com or Eucalyptus.

# Opensource.com published open innovation and open source innovation: what do they share and where do they differ?

# Zend Technologies announced the general availability of Zend Framework 1.11.

# The Outercurve Foundation is changing its bylaws and governance.

# Giuseppe Maxia announced that he is leaving Oracle’s MySQL team, and joining Continuent as director of quality assurance.

Industry giants show some give on openness

Apple got lots of attention when it opened up a bit recently — allowing third-party tools to develop applications for its devices and disclosing its App Store guidelines publicly, a move that we and many others applaud.

While it got less attention, Google also opened up a bit more by allowing all OSI-approved open source licenses, including the AGPL on its Google Code, a move that was also met with cheers from some. This comes as a welcome change from Google, which had previously resisted the AGPL.

We believe both moves were facilitated most by these respective smartphone, software and IT industry giants’ efforts to better address their partners and users. We also think it is further evidence of the pressure of openness, brought about largely because of free and open source software and its growth across enterprise, cloud computing and mobile markets. We described this pressure previously when we talked about Apple, Google and even others leaving opportunity for more open alternatives. Just as we have discussed how open source software is playing a role in the latest debates and discussions about openness in the cloud, we believe that free and open source software and its ideals of transparency and openness are also playing a role in mobile software and devices.

451 CAOS Links 2010.09.03

SLES for VMware. Red Hat for Makara? Controversy for OpenStack. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# VMware and Novell announced the general availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for VMware.

# The Register reported that Red Hat is in talks to buy JBoss cloud provisioning startup Makara.

# Andrew Clay Shafer clarified the apparent controversy regarding OpenStack, RackSpace, and Amazon’s APIs.

# Stephen Walli said there is no need to overhaul the Open Source Definition.

# Sironta Software launched with “open source alternative to Microsoft SharePoint” at OpenOffice.org Conference.

# Google outlined the future of Google Wave source code and protocol.

# Stephen Walli noted that with open source no one is working for free.

# Continuent announced the general availability of Continuent Tungsten version 1.3.

# Open-Xchange released a free migration tool for Microsoft Outlook users.

# OStatic explored Apple’s relationship with open source.

# Rhomobile updated its RhoSync open source sync server for enterprise data to version 2.0.

# Sendmail claimed 27%+ revenue growth in first half of 2010.

# JumpBox partnered with OnApp to make it easier for hosting providers to adopt open source web apps.

# The H declared that the hype around commercial open source software is over.

# ActiveState added packages to its ActivePython Business, Enterprise, and OEM Editions.

# Patrick Finch discussed the end of OpenSolaris (and Liverpool’s chances in Europe)?