On the rise and fall of the GNU GPL

Back in 2011 we caused something of a stir, to say the least, when we covered the trend towards permissive licensing at the expense of reciprocal copyleft licenses.

Since some people were dubious of Black Duck’s statistics, to put it mildly, we also validated our initial findings, at Bradley M Kuhn’s suggestion, using a selection of data from FLOSSmole, which confirmed the rate of decline in the proportion of projects using the GPL family of licenses between October 2008 and May 2011.

Returning to Black Duck’s figures, we later projected that if the rate of decline continued the GPL family of licenses (including the LGPL and AGPL) would account for only 50% of all open source software by September 2012.

As 2012 draws to a close it seems like a good time to revisit that projection and check the latest statistics.

I will preface this with an admission that yes, we know these figures only provide a very limited perspective on the open source projects in question. A more rounded study would look at other aspects such as how many lines of code a project has, how often it is downloaded, its popularity in terms of number of users or developers, how often the project is being updated, how many of the developers are employed by a single vendor, and what proportion of the codebase is contributed by developers other than the core committers. Since that would involve checking all these for more than 300,000 projects I’m going to pass on that.

Additionally, while all that is true, it does not mean that there is no value in examining the proportion of projects using a certain license. I am more interested in what the data does tell us, than what it doesn’t.

Data sources:
We analysed two distinct data sources for our previous analysis: Black Duck’s license data and a selection of data collected by FLOSSmole. Specifically we chose data from Rubyforge, Freecode (fka Freshmeat), ObjectWeb and the Free Software Foundation because those were the only sets for which historical (October 2008) data was available in mid 2011. For this update we have to use FLOSSmole’s data from September 2012 since the November 2012 dataset for the Free Software Foundation is incomplete. It is not possible to get a picture of GPLv2 traction using this FLOSSmole data since the majority of projects on Freecode are labelled “GPL” with no version number. In addition, for this update we have also looked at FLOSSmole data from Google Code, comparing datasets for November 2011 and November 2012. to get a sense of the trends on a newer project hosting site.

Black Duck’s data
According to Black Duck’s data the proportion of projects using the GNU GPL family of licenses declined from 70% in June 2008 to 53.24% today. The first thing to note therefore is that the rate of decline seen a year ago did not continue, and that the GNU GPL family of licenses continues to account for more than 50% of all open source software. The rate of the decline of the GNU GPLv2 has actually accelerated over the past year, however, and its usage is now almost the same as the combination of permissive licenses (I went with MIT/Apache/BSD/Ms-PL, you can argue about that last one if you like, but I’ve got to stick with it for consistency) at around 32%.

FLOSSmole’s data
Also in the interests of consistency I should clarify that we made a slight error in our previous calculations relating to the data from FLOSSmole. When we looked at the FLOSSmole data in June 2011 we reported a decline from 70.77% in October 2008 to 59.31% in May 2011. In calculating the data for this update I identified an error and that the figure should have been 62.8% in 2011. So less of a decline, but a decline nonetheless. The figures show that despite the total number of projects increasing from 54,000 in 2011 to 57,069 in September 2012, the proportion of projects using the GNU GPL family of licenses has remained steady at 62.8%. However, the proportion of projects using permissive licenses has grown, from 10.9% in 2008 to 13.4% in 2011 and 13.7% in September 2012.

Google Code data
The data from Google Code involves a much larger data set: 237,810 projects in 2011 and 300,465 in 2012. It also presents something problem since one of the choices on Google Code is dual-licensing using the Artistic License/GPL. Including these projects in the GNU GPL family count we see that the proportion of projects hosted on Google Code using the GNU GPL family of licenses declines from 54.7% in November 2011 to 52.7% in November 2011. Interestingly though the proportion of projects using permissive licenses also fell, from 38% in 2011 to 37.1% today. As a side note, the use of “other open source licenses” grew from 2.0% in 2011 to 4.3% in 2012.

What does it all mean? You can read as much or as little into the statistics as you wish. Since I am fed up with being accused of being a shill for providing analysis of the numbers I won’t bother to do so on this occasion – you are perfectly free to figure it out for yourselves.

Here’s everything in a single chart:

Announcing the Sixth Annual Future of Open Source Survey

Black Duck Software and North Bridge Venture Partners, in partnership with 451 Research, yesterday announced a collaboration to conduct the sixth annual Future of Open Source Survey.

The survey, an annual bellwether of the state of the open source industry, is supported by more than 20 open source software (OSS) industry leaders and is open to participation from the entire open source community.

The survey results point out market opportunities, identify issues affecting the enterprise adoption of open source, and foreshadow industry trends for 2012 and beyond. Open to the general public today, the survey closes at the end of April.

Survey results will be presented at the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC, May 20 – 21, 2012) at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco – Embarcadero during the keynote panel on opening day. Moderating the panel will be Tim Yeaton, CEO and President, Black Duck Software and Michael Skok, general partner at North Bridge Venture Partners. Yeaton and Skok will be joined by several industry executives including Tom Erickson, CEO, Acquia.

Take the survey here: http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/WEB22F4B845DQ5

See results of last year’s survey here.

On the continuing decline of the GPL

Our most popular CAOS blog post of the year, by some margin, was this one, from early June, looking at the trend towards persmissive licensing, and the decline in the usage of the GNU GPL family of licenses.

Prompted by this post by Bruce Byfield, I thought it might be interesting to bring that post up to date with a look at the latest figures.

NB: I am relying on the current set of figures published by Black Duck Software for this post, combined with our previous posts on the topic. I am aware that some people are distrustful of Black Duck’s figures given the lack of transparency on the methodology for collecting them. Since I previously went to a lot of effort to analyze data collected and published by FLOSSmole to find that it confirmed the trend suggested by Black Duck’s figures, I am confident that the trends are an accurate reflection of the situation.

The figures indicate that not only has the usage of the GNU GPL family of licenses (GPL2+3, LGPL2+3, AGPL) continued to decline since June, but that the decline has accelerated. The GPL family now accounts for about 57% of all open source software, compared to 61% in June.

As you can see from the chart below, if the current rate of decline continues, we project that the GPL family of licenses will account for only 50% of all open source software by September 2012.

That is still a significant proportion of course, but would be down from 70% in June 2008. Our projection also suggests that permissive licenses (specifically in this case, MIT/Apache/BSD/Ms-PL) will account for close to 30% of all open source software by September 2012, up from 15% in June 2009 (we don’t have a figure for June 2008 unfortunately).

Of course, there is no guarantee that the current rate of decline will continue – as the chart indicates the rate of decline slowed between June 2009 and June 2011, and it may well do so again. Or it could accelerate further.

Interestingly, however, while the more rapid rate of decline prior to June 2009 was clearly driven by the declining use of the GPLv2 in particular, Black Duck’s data suggests that the usage of the GPL family declined at a faster rate between June 2011 and December 2011 (6.7%) than the usage of the GPLv2 specifically (6.2%).

UPDATE – It is has been rightfully noted that this decline relates to the proportion of all open source software, while the number of projects using the GPL family has increased in real terms. Using Black Duck’s figures we can calculate that in fact the number of projects using the GPL family of licenses grew 15% between June 2009 and December 2011, from 105,822 to 121,928. However, in the same time period the total number of open source projects grew 31% in real terms, while the number of projects using permissive licenses grew 117%. – UPDATE

As indicated in June, we believe there are some wider trends that need to be discussed in relation to license usage, particularly with regards to vendor engagement with open source projects and a decline in the number of vendors engaging with strong copyleft licensed software.

The analysis indicated that the previous dominance of strong copyleft licenses was achieved and maintained to a significant degree due to vendor-led open source projects, and that the ongoing shift away from projects controlled by a single vendor toward community projects was in part driving a shift towards more permissive non-copyleft licenses.

We will update this analysis over the next few days with a look at the latest trends regarding the engagement of vendors with open source projects, and venture funding for open source-related vendors, providing some additional context for the trends related to licensing.

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.09

Funding for BlazeMeter and Digital Reasoning. Red Hat goes unstructured. And more.

# BlazeMeter announced $1.2m in Series A funding and launched the a cloud service for load and performance testing.

# Digital Reasoning announced a second round of funding to help develop its Hadoop-based analytics offering.

# Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Storage Software Appliance, based on its recent acquisition of Gluster.

# Red Hat also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2.

# Jaspersoft released Jaspersoft 4.5, delivering drag-and-drop analytics and reporting on Apache Hadoop, NoSQL and analytic databases.

# Jaspersoft also delivered a second-generation native connector to MongoDB.

# CloudBees announced the availability of Jenkins Enterprise by CloudBees providing support and enhanced capabilities for the Jenkins Continuous Integration platform.

# Diaspora* is back in action, and outlined its plans.

# Talend announced that Bi3 Solutions has embedded Talend Integration Suite inside its Software-as-a-Service platform.

# DataStax announced new versions of Apache Cassandra, DataStax Community, and DataStax Enterprise.

# The H reported that Microsoft’s Windows Store agreement has open source exception.

# Black Duck Software announced the release of Export 6.0.

# Antelink launched SourceSquare, a free open source scanning engine.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.18

Rapid7 secures new funding. Microsoft drops Dryad. And more.

# Rapid7 secured $50m in series C funding.

# Microsoft confirmed that it is ditching its Dryad project in favour of Apache Hadoop.

# Arun Murthy provided more details of Apache Hadop 0.23.

# The Google Plugin for Eclipse and GWT Designer projects are now fully open source.

# openSUSE released version 12.1.

# Amazon released the source code of the Kindle Fire.

# Black Duck Software joined the GENIVI Alliance.

# dotCloud announced the availability of the top three databases MySQL, MongoDB and Redis on its PaaS.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.10.28

Topics for this podcast:

*Opscode Chef extends to Windows for more enterprise devops
*Black Duck continues growth, gains new funding
*Cloudant expands NoSQL database focus, customers
*New open source Web server and vendor Nginx arrives
*The downside of Microsoft’s Android dollars

iTunes or direct download (27:35, 4.7MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.28

Sencha raises $15m. Facebook forms Open Compute foundation. And more.

# Sencha raised $15m in series B funding led by Jafco Ventures, previewed its Sencha.io MTML5 cloud platform.

# Facebook announced the formation of a foundation to lead the Open Compute Project, while Red Hat became a member.

# Digium and the Asterisk open source community released Asterisk 10.

# SUSE released an early development snapshot of its OpenStack-powered cloud infrastructure offering.

# Internap Network Services claimed to have launched the world’s first commercially available public cloud compute service based on the OpenStack.

# The Linux Foundation announced the consumer electronics Long Term Stable Kernel Initiative.

# Zmanda and Nexenta Systems announced availability of jointly developed and certified back-up solutions.

# BonitaSoft announced the availability of Bonita Open Solution 5.6.

# Black Duck Software announced version 2.0 of its Code Sight source code search engine.

# CFEngine unveiled CFEngine 3 Nova, a new version of its commercial configuration management software.

# The Hudson-CI team described the steps taken to prepare for membership of the Eclipse Foundation.

# Actuate announced BIRT Mobile Business Intelligence for Android devices.

# Red Hat, The Linux Foundation and Canonical published a white paper on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface.

# Stephen O’Grady responded to suggestions that open source doesn’t innovate.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.14

Dennis Ritchie RIP. Microsoft adopts Hadoop. And more.

# Dennis Ritchie, creator of C and co-creator of Unix, died aged 70. This article from Joe Brockmeier puts his influence into perspective.

# Microsoft announced plans to team up with Hortonworks and the Apache Hadoop community to create a distribution of Hadoop for Windows Server and Windows Azure.

# Hortonworks explained why it decided to work with Microsoft to support its Hadoop plans.

# Black Duck Software closed a $12m round of financing led by new investor Split Rock Partners.

# OpenOffice.org e.V pleaded for financial support for the OpenOffice.org project, prompting a statement of clarification from the Apache Software Foundation

# Microsoft noted that The Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) Working Group confirmed the availability of the AMQP 1.0 specification. Red Hat confirmed its support.

# Red Hat updated its JBoss Enterprise SOA Platform, JBoss Enterprise Data Services Platform and JBoss Enterprise Business Rules Management System product lines.

# Cloudera announced an integration partnership with MicroStrategy.

# Monsanto is creating is data integration and visualization platform based on the Cloudant suite.

# Samba can now accept code from corporations.

# VMware Micro Cloud Factory now includes PostgreSQL and RabbitMQ.

# Univa announced StackIQ will market, sell and support Univa Grid Engine to its customer and reseller channels.

# Openwave Systems is going to integrate Open-Xchange’s email technology into the Openwave Rich Mail product.

# X.commerce, a new business at eBay combining PayPal and Magento, joined the OpenStack community.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.11

Funding for NGINX and Spree. The State of Mozilla. And more.

# NGINX raised a $3m series A funding round

# Spree Commerce raised a $1.5m seed investment round

# The Mozilla Foundation published its 2010 annual report, including details of revenue up 18% to $123m.

# Black Duck Software added 69 new customers in Q3.

# SkySQL signed more than 160 new customers in its first year in business.

# The Linux Foundation added seven Europe-based companies as new members.

# Red Hat unveiled Arquillian 1.0.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.19

New funding for OpenLogic. Ubuntu adopts Cloud Foundry. And more.

# OpenLogic secured $2m in new funding and converted existing bridge financing, partly to finance its recently released CloudSwing PaaS software.

# Canonical announced that Ubuntu 11.10 will include VMware’s Cloud Foundry PaaS software.

# Red Hat announced the release of the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.0.

# Black Duck Software’s Black Duck Suite supports the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) Version 1 open source standard.

# SkySQL partnered with Sphinx Search to resell and distribute annual support subscriptions for the Sphinx Search Server.

# Hortonworks discussed the issue of data integrity and availability in Apache Hadoop.

# The OpenSFS Lustre community group has contracted Lustre services firm Whamcloud to add new functionality.

# Bradley M Kuhn provided some interesting insight into the history of the Symbian Foundation.

# The Linux Foundation produced a graphic illustration of 20 years of Linus.

# Stefano Maffulli became OpenStack’s new community manager.

# Geeks Without Frontiers released open source mesh WiFi network software.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.26

CloudBees raises $10.5m. Microsoft commits $100m to SUSE. And more.

# CloudBees secured $10.5m in Series B venture funding.

# Microsoft renewed its vows with Attachmate’s SUSE business unit, committing to invest $100m in new SUSE Linux Enterprise certificates over the next four years.

# Oracle announced that it has acquired Ksplice, twhioch offers zero downtime update technology for Linux.

# Ingres announced that Steve Shine has been named Chief Executive Officer and President.

# Dell unveiled the Dell OpenStack Cloud Solution.

# DotNetNuke announced the immediate availability of DotNetNuke 6

# SkySQL announced a partnership with Yoshinori Matsunobu, to provide technical support, professional services, and training for MySQL Master High Availability Manager and Tools (MySQL MHA).

# Oracle provided early access to new features being lined up for MySQL 5.6.

# Abiquo tripled its cloud management business in the first half of 2011.

# Black Duck grew sales 37% in Q2.

# Mark Shuttleworth discussed the responsibilities of [copyright] ownership.

# Linux 3.0 has been released.

# The Document Foundation provided an illustration of its developer community.

# GigaOm considered what it means if Hortonworks doesn’t do distribution.

# Postgres has replaced MySQL as the default database for Apple OS X.

# Gluster announced the beta release of GlusterFS 3.3.

FLOSSmole data confirms declining GPL usage

Last week we published a post looking at some statistics suggesting a decline in the usage of the GNU GPL.

The post sparked some interesting debate, not least about the validity of Black Duck Software’s numbers, which we had used to compare usage of the various FLOSS licenses over recent years.

While we have no specific reason to doubt Black Duck’s figures, Bradley M Kuhn, in particular, suggested that Black Duck’s data should be “ignored by serious researchers” since the company doesn’t disclose enough detail about its data collection methods.

He added that “AFAICT, FLOSSmole is the only project attempting to generate this kind of data and analysis thereof in a scientifically verifiable way”.

You can probably guess where this is going…

Started in 2004, FLOSSmole* collects data on open source software projects. FLOSSmole’s data is freely available via Google Code.

In order to test Black Duck’s data we downloaded FLOSSmole data from four sources for which both current (May 2011) and historical (October 2008) data was available: Rubyforge, Freshmeat, ObjectWeb and the Free Software Foundation.

We then sorted each data set and generated subtotals for each license type, checking the data manually to make sure we had combined all the relevant data (data tagged GPL2, GPLv2 and GNU GPLv2 for example).

Given the wide variety of ways in which the various GNU Public Licenses have been tagged across the four data sources (a huge number of Freshmeat projects are tagged simply “General Public License” with no version number) it also made sense to group the licenses together into the GPL family (including LGPL and AGPL).

The results show that the GPL family of licenses accounted for 70.77% of all 53,914 projects in the sample in October 2008. In May 2011 that figure had declined to 59.31% of 54,800.

As a reminder, the figures from Black Duck showed the proportion of projects using the GPL family of licenses had declined from 70% in June 2008 to 61% today. So the FLOSSmole figures actually show a more rapid decline in GPL usage than Black Duck’s.

One important point to note is that a significant number of projects (5,775) in the 2011 Freshmeat data do not have license details. Removing these projects from the sample would result in the GPL family of licenses representing 66.3% of 49,025 projects in 2011.

Either way, the FLOSSmole results confirm a decline in GPL usage.

UPDATE: Just to be clear, the figures for ‘GPL family’ above include both LGPL and AGPL as well. FLOSSmole’s figures show both increased from 2008-2011, from 6.22% to 7.21% and 0.11% to 0.36% respectively.

2ND UPDATE: Of course, the % of total projects is only one way to measure adoption, and some people will argue it’s not a particularly good one. Certainly we’re not going to get carried away with the fact that the % of projects hosted by the Free Software Foundation using the GPL family has declined from 81.2% to 76.7%. Although it is kind of interesting.

*Howison, J., Conklin, M., & Crowston, K. (2006). FLOSSmole: A collaborative repository for FLOSS research data and analyses. International Journal of Information Technology and Web Engineering, 1(3), 17–26. (more)

The trend towards permissive licensing

Ian Skerrett last week suggested that there is a growing trend in favour of permissive non-copyleft licenses at the expense of reciprocal copyleft licenses. Ian asked “name one popular community open source project created in the last 5 years that uses the AGPL or GPL?”

The responses didn’t exactly come thick and fast. I certainly couldn’t think of one. But the question did prompt me to look for some evidence for the trend away from copyleft licenses.

License usage
The first port of call for evidence of trends related to open source license use is Black Duck’s Open Source Resource Center. The lastest figures show that GPLv2 is used for 45.33% of projects in Black Duck’s KnowledgeBase, while the GPL family accounts for roughly 61% of all projects.

While the GPL family is dominant, comparing the latest figures with those provided in June 2008, June 2009, and some previous CAOS research from March 2010 indicates a steady decline in the use of the GPL family and the GPLv2 in particular.

According to Black Duck’s figures the proportion of open source projects using the GPL family of licenses has fallen to 61% today from 70% in June 2008, while the GPLv2 has fallen to 45% from 58% three years ago.

It is worth noting that the number of projects using the GPL licenses has increased in real terms over the past few years. According to our calculations based on Black Duck’s figures, the number of GPLv2 projects rose 5.5% between June 2009 and June 2011, while the total number of open source projects grew over 16%.

We should expect to see slower growth for the GPLv2 given it has been superseded but even though the number of AGPLv3 and GPLv3 projects grew 90% and 85% respectively over the past two years, that only resulted in 29% growth for the GPL family overall (while A/L/GPLv3 adoption appears to be slowing).

In comparison the number of Apache licensed projects grew 46% over the past two years, while the number of MIT licensed projects grew 152%. Indeed Black Duck’s figures indicate that the MIT License has been the biggest gainer in the last two years, jumping from 3.8% of all projects in June 2009 to 8.23% today, leapfrogging Apache, BSD, GPLv3 and LGPLv2.1 in the process.

While the level of adoption of copyleft licenses remains dominant, and continues to rise in terms of the number of projects, there is no escaping the continuing overall decline in terms of ‘license share’.

UPDATE – Since some people dod not trust Black Duck’s data I also took a look at data collected by FLOSSmole. The results are remarkably similar. – UPDATE

Vendor formation
Black Duck’s data is not the only indication that the importance of copyleft licenses has decreased in recent years. The research we conducted as part of of our Control and Community report also indicated a decline in the number of vendors engaging with strong copyleft licensed software.

Specifically, we evaluated the open source-related strategies of 300 software vendors and subsidiaries, including the license choice, development model, copyright strategy and revenue generator.

By plotting the results of this analysis against the year in which the companies were founded (for open source specialists) or began to engage with open source (for complementary vendors) we are able to gain a perspective on the changing popularity of the individual strategies*.

Having updated the results to the end of 2010, our analysis now covers 321 vendors and shows that 2010 was the first year in which there were more companies formed around projects with non-copyleft licences than with strong copyleft licences.

The formation of vendors around open source software with strong copyleft licenses peaked in 2006, having risen steadily between 1997 and 2006 – although there have been gains since 2007. By comparison, the formation of vendors around open source software with non-copyleft licences has been steadily increasing since 2002.

The results get even more interesting in terms of Ian’s question if we filter them by development model. Looking at community-led development projects, we see that there have been significantly more companies formed around community-led projects with non-copyleft licenses than with strong copyleft licenses since 2007.

In fact, strong copyleft licenses have been much more popular for vendor-led development projects, but even here there was an increase in the use of non-copyleft licenses in 2010.

This last chart illustrates something significant about the previous dominance of strong copyleft licenses: that it was achieved and maintained to a significant degree due to the vendor-led open source projects, rather than community-led projects.

One of the main findings of our Control and Community report was the ongoing shift away from projects controlled by a single vendor and back toward community and collaboration. While some might expect that to mean increased adoption of strong copyleft licenses – given that they are associated with collaborative development projects such as GNU and the Linux kernel – the charts above indicate a shift towards non copyleft.

As previously noted, while free software projects utilize strong copyleft to ensure that the software in question remains open (or as Bradley M Kuhn recently put it, to keep developers “honest”), vendors using the open core licensing strategy use strong copyleft licenses, along with copyright ownership, to ensure that only they have the opportunity to take it closed.

Either way, strong copyleft is used as a means of control on the code and the project, and our analysis backs up Ian’s contention that there is a trend away from control and towards more permissive non-copyleft licenses.

This is part of what we called the fourth stage of commercial open source business strategies and is being driven by the increased engagement of previously closed-source vendors with open source projects.

The fourth stage is about balancing the ability to create closed source derivatives with collaborative development through multi-vendor open source projects and permissive licensing, and as such it not only avoids the need to control a project through licensing, it actively discourages control through licensing.

That is why, in my opinion, the decline of the copyleft licenses has only just begun.

*The method is not perfect, since it plots the license being used today against the year of formation, and as such does not reflect licensing changes in the interim. It does provide us with an overview of general historical trends, however.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.12

Groklaw declares victory. Cloudera updates Hadoop distro. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Groklaw claimed victory, will stop publishing new articles on May 16.

# Cloudera released version 3 of its Hadoop distribution.

# VoltDB released version 1.3 of its open source distributed in-memory database.

# Black Duck grew sales by 51% in Q1.

# eXo and Convertigo partnered to add dynamic widget wiring to GateIn.

# Continuent’s Tungsten Replicator 2.0 for MySQL and PostgreSQL is now 100% open source.

# Texas Instrument introduced OpenLink, open source wireless connectivity for low power applications on Linux.

# Univa released Univa Grid Engine 8.0.

# OpenSAF released version 4.1 of its high availability middleware platform.

# MySQL Labs previewed memcached running directly against InnoDB in a MySQL server.

# Pentaho released version 1.0 of olap4j, an open Java API designed for any OLAP server.

# UnXis completed its purchase of SCO Group’s Unix assets, claimed trademarks never owned by SCO.

# Red Hat to re-visit virtual desktop strategy in 2012.

# Piston Inc has been formed to develop software and services on top of OpenStack.

# Renesas Electronics joined the Linux Foundation.

# Nuxeo is now incubated as an OW2 project.

# Dries Buytaert called for cross-pollination between PHP and PHP application developers.

# Oracle announced the first development milestone release for MySQL 5.6.

# Joyent and Nexenta target service providers with strategic partnership.

# Rapid7 and Sourcefire announced a product integration partnership.

# GigaSpaces has joined OpenStack, will collaborate with Citrix on OpenCloud.

# FuseSource added Fuse IDE for Camel to its Fuse Mediation Router subscription.

# Percona announced commercial Drizzle support, and new MySQL support pricing.

# Adobe and Zend introduced Adobe Flash Builder 4.5 for PHP while Adobe launched Flex 4.5.

451 CAOS Links 2011.03.25

Red Hat grows revenue 20%+. Google withholding Honeycomb source code. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Red Hat reported Q4 revenue up 25% to $245m, FY revenue up 22% to $909m

# Google is withholding the source code to Honeycomb for the foreseeable future.

# Rick Clark explained why he left Rackspace amid concerns that the company is exerting too much control over OpenStack.

# DataStax launched Brisk, a Hadoop/Hive distribution built on Apache Cassandra.

# Details emerged about Mapr, which is building a proprietary version of Hadoop.

# Hadapt emerged from stealth mode to commercialize HadoopDB research project.

# Mark Radcliffe said the analysis behind Android GPL violation claim is “fundamentally flawed”.

# OpenLogic partnered with MuleSoft to resell Tcat Server.

# Stephen Walli explained why the Symbian Foundation failed.

# North Bridge and 22 open source leaders launched the fifth annual Future of Open Source Survey.

# Evident Software launched ClearStone 5.0, monitoring Cassandra, Memcached/Membase, and MongoDB. (amongst others).

# Evident Software announced strategic partnerships with Terracotta, EsperTech, Neo Technology, and Cirrus Technologies.

# Black Duck Software announced the availability of Black Duck Suite 6.

# Great Bloomberg interview with Cloudera CEO Mike Olson on open source and big data.

# Continuent updated its Tungsten Enterprise replication and data management offering for MySQL and PostgreSQL.

# Genuitec released MyEclipse Enterprise Workbench and MyEclipse Blue Edition 9.0.

# Tasktop Technologies announced Tasktop Enterprise 2.0, including Task Federation.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.01.21

Topics for this podcast:

*Black Duck update, latest acquisition Olliance Group
*New growth and closed source add-on plans for 10gen
*VC investment for open source vendors up in 2010
*Open source profitability discussed
*Is cloud computing opening up?

iTunes or direct download (24:49, 4.3MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.21

The OSI and FSF unite against CPTN. Appcelerator acquires Aptana. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# The OSI and the FSF published a joint position statement on the proposed sale of Novell’s patents to CPTN. (PDF)

# Groklaw reported that another party might be interested in Novell’s patents “and maybe more”.

# The European Commission is not interested in investigating the sale of Novell’s patents to CPTN.

# Appcelerator acquired Aptana.

# Open source graph database vendor Sones raised a second round of funding. Reportedly $2.68m.

# Savio Rodrigues considered the impact of Amazon Elastic Beanstalk on the open source Java market.

# CloudBees introduced training for Hudson continuous integration server.

# ActiveState and Rogue Wave partnered to bring embeddable mathematical and statistical functionality to Python developers.

# DotNetNuke introduced support for Microsoft’s WebMatrix and Razor products.

# OpenERP launched OpenERP v6 with both on-site and SaaS versions.

# Convirture surpassed 45,000 downloads of ConVirt Open Source in 2010 and now counts more than 2,000 deployments.

# Black Duck added 169 new customers in 2010.

# Funambol introduced Funambol v9.

# KnowledgeTree grew customer acquisitions 215% in the fourth quarter.

# Joyent announced SmartDataCenter 6, the latest version of its cloud operating system.

# OpenLogic is now providing support for Talend’s community edition data integration software.

# SkySQL gathered 40 customers in its first 12 weeks, generated sales of seven figures.

# EnterpriseDB is making its SQL/Protect, PL/Secure and xDB Replication Server tools available for PostgreSQL.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced Apache Pivot 2.0.

# Sonatype released the results of a survey of 1,600 developers, architects and managers.

# A year after Oracle’s acquisition of Sun, Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart reported on the status of the open source projects.

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.11

Black Duck acquires Olliance Group. Funding for Zend and PHP Flog. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Black Duck Software acquired Olliance Group.

# Viola Private Equity invested $7m in Zend Technologies.

# PHP Fog raised $1.8m from Madrona Venture Group, First Round Capital, Founder’s Co-op, and other angel investors.

# The proposal for CPTN Holdings to acquire Novell’s patents has reportedly been withdrawn.

# Jaspersoft announced a major update to its open source BI suite with Jaspersoft 4.

# ZDnet reported on no GPL Apps for Apple’s App Store. Jason Perlow examined the implications. Stephen Walli suggested a solution to the GPL/Apple App Store conundrum: dual licensing (assuming copyright ownership).

# ICEsoft announced version 2 of its ICEfaces open source Rich Internet Application development framework.

# The Eclipse Foundation introduced Orion, a browser-based open tool integration platform.

# The future of Hudson includes a proposal to change the project’s name to Jenkins.

# MuleSoft announced the general availability of Mule ESB 3.1.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced the launch of Apache Cassandra 0.7.

# Matt Asay highlighted the need for open source specialist vendors to innovate, as well as commoditize.

# Oracle has reportedly dropped support for MySQL on IBM’s i operating system.

# Red Hat is retaining is Raleigh HQ and planning to add 540 new jobs.

# Version 1.6 of the Joomla open source CMS is now available.

# Appcelerator claimed to have more than doubled in size since the end of November.

# Nominations are now open for the 2011 Eclipse board members.

# Brian Behlendorf became the World Economic Forum chief technology officer.

# Broadcom joined the Linux Foundation as did GoAhead Software.

# A glass-half-full look at Oracle’s approach to open source.

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.07

Salesforce.com acquires DimDim. Sourcefire acquires Immunet. Synga acquires Flock. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Salesforce.com confirmed its acquisition of DimDim but stated that it will no longer contribute to the OSS project.

# Sourcefire acquired Immunet.

# Zynga acquired social browser provider Flock.

# Cloudera became a sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation.

# OStatic reported on open source lion collars.

# Dave Neary published Open Source community building: a guide to getting it right.

# The ASF confirmed that Apache OODT (Object-Oriented Data Technology) is now a Top-Level Project.

# Revolution Analytics tripled its enterprise customer base and grew revenue from Revolution R Enterprise 450% in 2010.

# The January edition of the OSBR is focused on the business of open source.

# Drupal 7 is now available.

# Protecode joined the Linux Foundation.

# Wayne Jackson explained why Sonatype moved Nexus to the Affero General Public License.

# ServerWatch examined Cisco’s changing approach to cloud computing and open source software.

# HDB Newco Inc (HadoopDB) joined Connecticut Innovations Inc incubator.

# Black Duck named its open source project rookies of the year.

451 CAOS Links 2010.12.15

Google contributes WindowBuilder to Eclipse. Backdoors in OpenBSD? And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Google contributed WindowBuilder and CodePro Profiler to the Eclipse Foundation.

# Oracle is in another Java legal battle, this time with Myriad Group.

# Are there US Government backdoors in OpenBSD? One alleged FBI plant denies involvement.

# Puppet Labs released MCollective version 1.0 following its acquisition of The Marionette Collective.

# Eucalyptus partnered with Red Hat on Eucalyptus support for RHEV and compatibility with Apache Deltacloud.

# Gazzang last week raised $3.5m for software to secure open source software for use in the cloud.

# Richard Stallman warned against Google’s Chrome OS.

# Lucid Imagination announced the general availability and free download for LucidWorks Enterprise.

# The openSUSE project announced the appointment of Alan Clark as openSUSE board chair.

# Black Duck adding IBM Rational AppScan Source Edition to its code-scanning assessment services.

# The Apache Software Foundation launched the Apache Extras hosting site for complementary projects.

# Karmasphere integrated Apache Hive with the Karmasphere Application Framework to create Karmasphere Analyst.

# WSO2 launched WSO2 Application Server 4.0 with full Apache Tomcat support.

# CloudBees acquired Java PaaS provider Stax Networks.

# Facebook explained how it uses Hadoop and released the code of its internal distribution.

# NEC and Novell created a high availability offering optimized for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

# Dries Buytaert explained how Drupal benefits from VC funding.

# Canonical, GENIVI, HP, LiMo Foundation and MontaVista Software are to become advisers to Linaro.

# Bill Burke welcomed the ASFs departure from the JCP, blames the ASF for Java 7 delay.

# The Linux Foundation appointed OpenEmbedded core developer and Yocto Project maintainer Richard Purdie as a Fellow.

# C12G Labs announced version 2.0 OpenNebulaPro, based on the OpenNebula Toolkit.