Our 2013 Database survey is now live

451 Research’s 2013 Database survey is now live at http://bit.ly/451db13 investigating the current use of database technologies, including MySQL, NoSQL and NewSQL, as well as traditional relation and non-relational databases.

The aim of this survey is to identify trends in database usage, as well as changing attitudes to MySQL following its acquisition by Oracle, and the competitive dynamic between MySQL and other databases, including NoSQL and NewSQL technologies.

There are just 15 questions to answer, spread over five pages, and the entire survey should take less than ten minutes to complete.

All individual responses are of course confidential. The results will be published as part of a major research report due during Q2.

The full report will be available to 451 Research clients, while the results of the survey will also be made freely available via a
presentation at the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo in April.

Last year’s results have been viewed nearly 55,000 times on SlideShare so we are hoping for a good response to this year’s survey.

One of the most interesting aspects of a 2012 survey results was the extent to which MySQL users were testing and adopting PostgreSQL. Will that trend continue or accelerate in 2013? And what of the adoption of cloud-based database services such as Amazon RDS and Google Cloud SQL?

Are the new breed of NewSQL vendors having any impact on the relational database incumbents such as Oracle, Microsoft and IBM? And how is SAP HANA adoption driving interest in other in-memory databases such as VoltDB and MemSQL?

We will also be interested to see how well NoSQL databases fair in this year’s survey results. Last year MongoDB was the most popular, followed by Apache Cassandra/DataStax and Redis. Are these now making a bigger impact on the wider market, and what of Basho’s Riak, CouchDB, Neo4j, Couchbase et al?

Additionally, we have been tracking attitudes to Oracle’s ownership of MySQL since the deal to acquire Sun was announced. Have MySQL users’ attitudes towards Oracle improved or declined in the last 12 months, and what impact will the formation of the MariaDB Foundation have on MariaDB adoption?

We’re looking forward to analyzing the results and providing answers to these and other questions. Please help us to get the most representative result set by taking part in the survey at http://bit.ly/451db13

CouchDB – sink or swim?


CouchDB – up a creek without a paddle? Image source: bobbyfeind on Flickr

Almost a year ago Apache CouchDB creator Damien Katz announced that he would no longer be contributing to the CouchDB document database project he had created, choosing instead to focus on the development of Couchbase Server 2.0, which united CouchDB with Membase Server.

While the abandonment of an open source project by the person that created it is by no means unprecedented it is still unusual enough to warrant a look at what has happened to CouchDB in the year that followed.

Surviving or thriving?

The first point to make is that the survival of CouchDB following Katz’s departure was never in doubt, thanks to the fact that it is an Apache Foundation project. One of the benefits of the foundation model is that it doesn’t depend on a dominant developer or vendor to keep a project moving forward.

Although it briefly appeared that Cloudant would fulfil the role of the major corporate backer of CouchDB with its BigCouch clustered CouchDB technology after Couchbase discontinued its own CouchDB distribution, the company instead refocused its attention on its CouchDB- and BigCouch-based managed service.

While developers from both Couchbase and Cloudant continue to develop to the project Apache CouchDB doesn’t have a lead corporate backer, nor does it need one. According to factoids gathered by Ohloh, there were 30 contributors to the Apache CouchDB project in the past 12 months, up from 18 in the prior 12 months, and placing CouchDB in the top 2% of all project teams on Ohloh.

The question is not whether CouchDB is surviving, however, but whether it is thriving. That increase in contributor count would suggest so, but that’s by no means the full story. In contrast, the number of commits per month has declined in the past 12 months, representing, as Ohloh describes it, “a substantial decrease in development activity”. As the related chart illustrates, in fact, activity has pretty much flatlined since the beginning of the year.


Source: Ohloh

This should not be altogether surprising since the latest release went GA in April.

In response to a request for comment, a spokesperson on behalf of the Apache CouchDB PMC stated:

“Despite an unsettled start to the year, the CouchDB project and the
surrounding community continue to grow and evolve, with the release of
1.2.0 earlier this year, and the forthcoming 1.3.0, currently being
prepared for release
. 1.3.0 includes in the last year alone, over 221
commits on the just the master branch, comprising 167 files changed,
5745 insertions, 2248 deletions — solid progress for a project with
22,000 lines of code total.”

Additionally, while the start of that flatline coincides with Katz’s departure from the project, it is not clear that the two are actually related. Ohloh figures indicate that Katz hadn’t actually committed code to the project since August 2010 and is only the eighth all-time most active committer to the project.

It is clear that there is still a lot of activity ongoing in the Apache CouchDB community, with the PMC citing rcouch, bigcouch, PouchDB, TouchDB frameworks for both iOS and Android, a Mac OS X binary installation, and
GeoCouch.

The PMC spokesperson added:

“Structurally, the project has added both committers and grown the
project management committe, and has been having regular meetings
through the last 2 months to improve communication within the team,
and help steer the community. A roadmap has been put together, and
Ubuntu-style time-scheduled releases are planned for 2013 to keep the
good oil flowing.”

However, in assessing the health of Apache CouchDB, we must look at adoption trends, as well as project activity.

Waving or drowning?

Searching mailing list archives using MarkMail indicates that there has been a decline in the number of messages to the developer, user, commits mailing lists in the past 12 months, although with increased activity on the latter since July.

Additionally, figures from Indeed.com suggest that job activity related to CouchDB saw a sharp decline in the early months of the year, although also a recovery in recent months.


couchdb Job Trends graph

couchdb Job Trends Couchdb jobs

However, that activity is perhaps best viewed in the context of a comparison with another major NoSQL project – MongoDB for instance – which reveals that CouchDB job postings have more or less level-off since the start of the year.


couchdb, mongodb Job Trends graph

couchdb, mongodb Job Trends Couchdb jobsMongodb jobs

We have also been tracking the traction of NoSQL projects via searches of LinkedIn member profiles. The latest figures, due to be published later this week, show that mentions of CouchDB in LinkedIn member profiles grew over 139% between December 2011 and today.

That sounds good, but again must be viewed in the context of the rest of the NoSQL ecosystem. The statistics show that mentions of a selection of other major NoSQL databases grew significantly faster in the same period.

So what are we to make of all the evidence. Clearly the Apache CouchDB project will survive, and the lack of updates in 2012 is not a major concern, although the level of interest in the project is not growing as fast as other NoSQL technologies. My personal gut feel is that Apache CouchDB has the potential to become the PostgreSQL of the NoSQL generation: a solid, mature projects with a large community of developers and ecosystem of associated vendors that is often over-shadowed by more commercially-oriented alternatives but has a loyal and committed user-base.

Key to this comparison bearing up on longterm scrutiny will be the ability of the Apache CouchDB project to increase and maintain the level of development so that the Lines of code chart, above, better resembles that of PostgreSQL, below:

The comparison with PostgreSQL is also apt given the departure from the project of its creator. While many people do know the origins of the PostgreSQL project given that the original project leader is one of the most famous database experts in the world, I am sure a lot of PostgreSQL users wouldn’t know or care whether the project’s creator continued to be involved. Similarly, Katz’s departure from Apache CouchDB, while undoubtedly a short-term challenge, appears not to have had a significant impact on the project’s ongoing development.

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.14

Jive goes public. webOS goes open source. Cloud Foundry goes .NET. And more.

# Jive Software started IPO at $12 a share, closing the day up nearly 30%.

# HP announced that it plans to release webOS under an open source license. Details are thin on the ground, although Fedora is reportedly an inspiration. Joel West’s post pretty much summed up my thoughts.

# Tier 3 announced that it has created Iron Foundry, and open source .NET Framework implementation of Cloud Foundry.

# Xeround raised $9m funding for its MySQL-as-a-service cloud database.

# Microsoft released the Windows Azure SDK for Node.js as open source and made available a preview of the Apache Hadoop on Windows Azure, amongst a slew of other open source-related announcements.

# Red Hat, Canonical, Cisco, IBM, Intel, NetApp, and SUSE created the oVirt project, based around Red Hat’s Enterprise Virtualization technology for managing KVM environments.

# Nuxeo announced the availability of Nuxeo Platform 5.5.

# Joyent launched its SmartMachine Appliance for MongoDB.

Red Hat announced JBoss Enterprise Portal Platform 5.2 and JBoss Operations Network 3.0.

# Novell announced the availability of Novell Open Enterprise Server 11.

# Couchbase claimed thousands of open source deployments and 150 commercial deployments, but has rethought its product line-up for 2012, having “confused the heck” out of potential users in 2011.

# Univention released Univention Corporate Server 3.0.

# SuccessBricks announced that its ClearDB distributed MySQL-based database service is now available through Heroku.

# Ember.js is the new name for the SproutCore 2.0 JavaScript framework.

# HEnrik Ingo examined the recent spate of MySQL authentication plug-ins.

451 CAOS Links. 2011.12.02

Talend delivers v5. Zentyal raises series A. The TCO of OSS. And more.

# Talend announced version 5 of its data integration suite, adding business process management capabilities via an OEM relationship with BonitaSoft. Yves De Montcheuil explained the name changes in version 5.

# Zentyal closed a series A venture capital funding of over $1m by Open Ocean Capital.

# The London School of Economics released a report on the total cost of ownership of open source software.

# Couchbase announced the availability of the Couchbase Hadoop Connector, developed in conjunction with Cloudera.

# Rackspace announced the private beta of Rackspace MySQL Cloud Database.

# The debate over the role of open source foundations in the Git era continued, including a follow-up by the instigator, Mikael Rogers, a rallying cry for autonomy from Ceki Gülcü, and Simon Phipps warning about throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

# Marco Abis is stepping down as CEO of Sourcesense.

# NGINX usage has grown almost 300% over the last year, according to Netcraft figures discussed by Royal Pingdom.

# The Wireless Innovation Forum announced the formation of the Open Source Framework for Commercial Baseband Software project.

VC funding for Hadoop and NoSQL tops $350m

451 Research has today published a report looking at the funding being invested in Apache Hadoop- and NoSQL database-related vendors. The full report is available to clients, but non-clients can find a snapshot of the report, along with a graphic representation of the recent up-tick in funding, over at our Too Much Information blog.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.18

DOCOMO adopts, invests in Couchbase. Apache Cassandra reaches 1.0. And more.

# DOCOMO Innovations adopted Couchbase as DOCOMO Capital invested in the NoSQL database vendor.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced Apache Cassandra v1.0.

# Nuxeo announced the availability of Nuxeo Cloud.

# SGI formed a distribution relationship with Cloudera and announced a record-breaking performance benchmark.

# Rapid7 announced the launch of Metasploit Community Edition.

# VoltDB announced the general availability of VoltOne.

# Juniper Networks licensed OpenNMS to add fault and performance management capabilities to the Junos Space software platform.

# The Free Software Foundation warned against Microsoft’s “Secure Boot” system.

Red Hat considering NoSQL/Hadoop acquisition

InternetNews.com yesterday published an article based on an interview with Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst asking the question “Is Red Hat Interested in the Database Market?”

In truth there was no real need to ask the question, as Whitehurst’s comments made it pretty clear that Red Hat is interested in the database market, and specifically the NoSQL database market.

“When I say I don’t want to be a database company, I’m saying that I don’t want to be a SQL database company,” Whitehurst said.

In case the implications of that statement were not entirely clear, he later added:

“But we would be very interested in a NoSQL type database or Hadoop type thing,” Whitehurst said. “Those are interesting as they represent net new.”

The article adds that Whitehurst would not specifically state whether Red Hat will or will not actually acquire anyone, as is to be expected, but the comments are the clearest indication yet that Red Hat sees value in a potential NoSQL acquisition.

This is something that we have seen for some time, pointing out in May 2010 that “We have consistently noted that the database remains a missing layer in Red Hat’s software stack… and would see advantages in adding an open source NoSQL database to its portfolio to target MySQL users.”

We are by no means the only people to have highlighted the database-shaped hole in Red Hat’s portfolio, but while Red hat has previously shied away from speculation linking it with a relational database vendor (seemingly in order to avoid disrupting its relationship with Oracle) as Jim points out, NoSQL and Hadoop are far more attractive given their growth is based on new projects, rather than the much tougher proposition of competing for incumbent database projects.

So what emerging open source projects might be of interest to Red Hat? Its OpenShift PaaS launched with support for 10gen’s MongoDB and later added support for Couchbase’s Membase, which makes them obvious contenders. We suspect that avoiding overlap and delivering compatibility with Red Hat’s JBoss Enterprise Data Grid technology would be a key part of the decision-making process.

As for Hadoop – Cloudera is the obvious choice but we imagine that any move would be likely to start a bidding war from which Red Hat might not emerge victorious. Hortonworks has only just emerged from Yahoo, of course, but might be an option for a more services-led approach.

Then there is DataStax, which could give Red Hat the opportunity to kill two birds with one stone with its Brisk Hadoop distribution and Apache Cassandra-related software and services.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.12

Couchbase raises $14m. AppFog raises $8m. Much ado about Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo. And more.

# Couchbase raised $14m in series C funding for its NoSQL database.

# AppFog raised $8m series B funding for its PHP-based platform-as-a-service.

# Percona announced its plans to host a Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo on April 10-12, effectively replacing the O’Reilly MySQL Conference and Expo.

# The announcement sparked some rumblings of discomfort around the MySQL community with Giuseppe Maxia and Sheeri Cabral disputing Baron Schwartz’s claim that “to the best of our knowledge, no one else was planning one” and Monty Widenius stating that he had “personally talked with Percona about this a few weeks ago”.

# SkySQL’s Kaj Arno also called for the community to rally around an event focused on users, while Henrik Ingo welcomed the Percona event and doubted whether plans for a vendor-neutral event had got very far. Roland Bouman also voiced his support for the event.

# Red Hat announced that its Red Hat OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service now supports Java Enterprise Edition 6

# Jaspersoft announced Self-Service Express, offering open source users BI documentation and knowledge base articles.

# Microsoft apparently no longer thinks Linux is a competitive threat to its desktop business.

# Cisco and Twitter joined the Open Invention Network.

# Fabrizio Capobianco asked if there really is room for a third mobile OS.

# Alembic 1.0, the open source computer graphics interchange format jointly developed by Sony Pictures Imageworks and Lucasfilm was released.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.08.05

Topics for this podcast:

*Our latest special report, ‘Going Open, Going Closed’
*OpenStack marks one year with commercial success, community concerns
*Couchbase previews fruit of integration, unstructured query language
*OSCON and where we are in enterprise open source
*Vendor-led community projects discussed

iTunes or direct download (35:25, 6.1MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.29

Open Cloud Initiative launches. HP joins OpenStack. Oracle releases Java 7. And more.

# The Open Cloud Initiative launched to drive open standards in cloud computing.

# HP announced its support for OpenStack.

# Oracle announced the availability of Java SE 7. The Apache Software Foundation warned of index corruption and crashes in Apache Lucene and Solr.

# Nebula launched with plans for a turnkey OpenStack hardware appliance.

# Concurrent raised $900K in seed funding for Hadoop-based workflow engine.

# Couchbase and SQLite teamed up to create UnQL (Unstructured Query Language), a new data query language for unstructured data.

# Couchbase released a developer preview of Couchbase Server 2.0, combining CouchDB and Membase.

# OpenLogic published its scorecard to assess how well a particular Platform-as-a-Service offering meets the standard of ‘open’.

# Brian Proffitt asked can a commercial vendor lead a project as openly as a foundation?

# Gluster announced the Gluster Connector for OpenStack.

# Google released its LevelDB key value storage engine using the BSD license.

# SkySQL introduced SkySQL Recovery Manager, a MySQL backup and recovery offering powered by Zmanda.

# Metasploit announced the launch of Metasploit Pro 4.0.

# WANdisco partnered with CloudBees to offer Jenkins with WANdisco’s uberSVN application lifecycle management platform for Apache Subversion.

# Brian Proffitt reported on how innovation is the new draw of open source.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.17

TDF reveals its advisory board. ActiveState acquires Phenona. And more.

# The Document Foundation revealed the members of its advisory board: Google, SUSE, Red Hat, Freies Office Deutschland, Software in the Public Interest, and the Free Software Foundation.

# ActiveState acquired Phenona, a Perl PaaS provider.

# LexisNexis Risk Solutions released its HPCC Systems competitor ti Hadoop under an open source license.

# Oracle is seeking significant damages in its Android-related dispute with Google, while Google disputed Oracle’s claims about the fragmentation of Java.

# Couchbase announced performance enhancements for Apache CouchDB, included in the the developer preview of Couchbase Single Server 2.0.

# Appcelerator released Titanium Studio for building, testing, and deploying cross-platform applications, based on development technology acquired from Aptana.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced Apache Traffic Server v3.0.0.

# Google announced the availability of its Chromebooks from Acer and Samsung.

# Nuxeo has launched a new version of its Case Management Framework, an enhanced distribution of Nuxeo Enterprise Platform.

# SpagoBI released version 3.0 of its open source business intelligence suite.

# Funambol announced the general availability of MediaHub, a cloud-based digital locker.

# Stephen O’Grady analysed the results of The Eclipse Foundation’s developer survey.

# Adobe transfered its development focus for AIR for Linux from the desktop to mobile.

# Law.com reported that open source could change the future of e-discovery.

# David Eaves explained how GitHub saved open source.

# Brian Proffitt argued that fork history does not favor OpenOffice.org.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.10

Yet more Apache OpenOffice fall-out. Bacula Systems raises $5m. And more.

# As the proposal to incubate OpenOffice.org at Apache went live, controversy about the proposal continued. The Free Software Foundation unsurprisingly voiced its support in favour of the LGPL LibreOffice project,which Keith Curtis outlined his opposition to the plan.

# Bacula Systems raised $5m from KM Capital Partners and from the Swiss Canton of Vaud.

# Joe Brockmeier explained how Microsoft’s patent loss could be bad news for open source.

# Computacenter raised the prospect of legal action against open source support supplier Sirius for complaining to Parliament about its “Microsoft bias”.

# Jahia announced the commercial release of its Jahia 6.5 content management system.

# Couchbase announced the general availability of Membase Server 1.7.

# Talend announced Talend Cloud, its cloud-enabled integration platform.

# Stefano Maffulli considered the implications of the declining adoption of copyleft licenses.

# Ian Skerrett introduced some key finding from the 2011 Eclipse community survey.

Necessity is the mother of NoSQL

As we noted last week, necessity is one of the six key factors that are driving the adoption of alternative data management technologies identified in our latest long format report, NoSQL, NewSQL and Beyond.

Necessity is particularly relevant when looking at the history of the NoSQL databases. While it is easy for the incumbent database vendor to dismiss the various NoSQL projects as development playthings, it is clear that the vast majority of NoSQL projects were developed by companies and individuals in response to the fact that the existing database products and vendors were not suitable to meet their requirements with regards to the other five factors: scalability, performance, relaxed consistency, agility and intricacy.

The genesis of much – although by no means all – of the momentum behind the NoSQL database movement can be attributed to two research papers: Google’s BigTable: A Distributed Storage System for Structured Data, presented at the Seventh Symposium on Operating System Design and Implementation, in November 2006, and Amazon’s Dynamo: Amazon’s Highly Available Key-Value Store, presented at the 21st ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles, in October 2007.

The importance of these two projects is highlighted by The NoSQL Family Tree, a graphic representation of the relationships between (most of) the various major NoSQL projects:

Not only were the existing database products and vendors were not suitable to meet their requirements, but Google and Amazon, as well as the likes of Facebook, LinkedIn, PowerSet and Zvents, could not rely on the incumbent vendors to develop anything suitable, given the vendors’ desire to protect their existing technologies and installed bases.

Werner Vogels, Amazon’s CTO, has explained that as far as Amazon was concerned, the database layer required to support the company’s various Web services was too critical to be trusted to anyone else – Amazon had to develop Dynamo itself.

Vogels also pointed out, however, that this situation is suboptimal. The fact that Facebook, LinkedIn, Google and Amazon have had to develop and support their own database infrastructure is not a healthy sign. In a perfect world, they would all have better things to do than focus on developing and managing database platforms.

That explains why the companies have also all chosen to share their projects. Google and Amazon did so through the publication of research papers, which enabled the likes of Powerset, Facebook, Zvents and Linkedin to create their own implementations.

These implementations were then shared through the publication of source code, which has enabled the likes of Yahoo, Digg and Twitter to collaborate with each other and additional companies on their ongoing development.

Additionally, the NoSQL movement also boasts a significant number of developer-led projects initiated by individuals – in the tradition of open source – to scratch their own technology itches.

Examples include Apache CouchDB, originally created by the now-CTO of Couchbase, Damien Katz, to be an unstructured object store to support an RSS feed aggregator; and Redis, which was created by Salvatore Sanfilippo to support his real-time website analytics service.

We would also note that even some of the major vendor-led projects, such as Couchbase and 10gen, have been heavily influenced by non-vendor experience. 10gen was founded by former Doubleclick executives to create the software they felt was needed at the digital advertising firm, while online gaming firm Zynga was heavily involved in the development of the original Membase Server memcached-based key-value store (now Elastic Couchbase).

In this context it is interesting to note, therefore, that while the majority of NoSQL databases are open source, the NewSQL providers have largely chosen to avoid open source licensing, with VoltDB being the notable exception.

These NewSQL technologies are no less a child of necessity than NoSQL, although it is a vendor’s necessity to fill a gap in the market, rather than a user’s necessity to fill a gap in its own infrastructure. It will be intriguing to see whether the various other NewSQL vendors will turn to open source licensing in order to grow adoption and benefit from collaborative development.

NoSQL, NewSQL and Beyond is available now from both the Information Management and Open Source practices (non-clients can apply for trial access). I will also be presenting the findings at the forthcoming Open Source Business Conference.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.15

VMware launches Cloud Foundry. Red Hat heads for Ceylon. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# VMware launched Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-service and open source project.

# Red Hat’s Gavin King revealed details of the company’s Ceylon project.

# Red Hat submitted a number of specification requests for Java EE 7.

# Terracotta accused Red Hat of “trying to pull a fast one” with its data cache JSR.

# Zencoder, the company behind the open source VideoJS viewer, raised $2m in funding.

# OpenStack distribution provider Midokura raised $1.3m in seed funding.

# 10gen’s MongoDB is a core data service in VMware’s Cloud Foundry (along with MySQL and Redis).

# Tuxera has merged the NTFS-3G and ntfsprogs projects, creating its new Tuxera NTFS Community Edition.

# Nuxeo released a Google Search Appliance plugin.

# Opsview updated its Opsview Enterprise open source IT monitoring software.

# Joe Brockmeier presented six public relations lessons for open source projects.

# Couchbase spun off its CouchDB hosting business as Iris Couch.

# Neo Technology explained why Neo4j Community (now at version 1.3) is now GPLv3.

# SkySQL introduced a reference architecture for deploying MySQL or MariaDB databases.

# Jive Software acquired Proximal Labs.

# Gluster Virtual Storage Appliances now support KVM and Xen.

# Talend’s Ross Turk shared his perspective on balancing open core and community.

# Percona announced its roadmap for Percona Server and XtraBackup.

# Support for Flock browsers will be discontinued as of April 26th, 2011.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.05

Cfengine raises funding. Symbian is *not* open source. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Cfengine raised NOK 30m ($5.5m) for open source configuration management software play.

# Nokia reiterated that it is not maintaining Symbian as an open source development project.

# Mozilla is folding Mozilla Messaging back into Mozilla Labs.

# SugarCRM acquired Lotus Notes tools provider iExtensions, cozied up to IBM.

# Stack Overflow open-sourced Dapper, its object relational mapper for SQL Server and .NET.

# The Department of Veterans Affairs announced plans to move its VistA EHR system to an open source platform.

# Gorilla Logic updated its open source functional testing tool for iPhone and iPad applications.

# Couchbase announced the release of Membase Server for Mac OS X.

# Simon Phipps discussed the impact that copyright contribution agreements can have on community trust.

# The White House released the source code to its Drupal-based ITDashboard.gov tool.

451 CAOS Links 2011.03.22

Paranoid Android. Canonical and Gnome. A new OSI. And more.

Paranoid Android
If you are interested in the potential violation of the GPL by the Android kernel you have probably already immersed yourself in the numerous blog posts published on the topic. If not, start with Sean Hogle’s analysis or Bradley M Kuhn’s overview of the original allegations and work backwards from there, not forgetting a detour for the obligatory Microsoft connection. Linus Torvalds said claim “seems totally bogus”. In the meantime, Microsoft sued Barnes & Noble, Foxconn and Inventec for patent infringement by their Android devices.

On the relationship between Canonical and Gnome
Similarly, if you already have an interest in the relationship between Canonical and the Gnome community you will probably have already read the numerous posts written on the subject in the past week. If not Dave Neary’s Lessons Learned is a good place to start, while Mark Shuttelworth’s response is also worth a read, as is his earlier post. If you are *really* interested in the relationship between Canonical and Gnome, look no further than Jeff Waugh’s series of posts on the subject.

A new Open Source Initiative
The Open Source Initiative confirmed its new board appointments and announced plans to move to a representative model that will enable open source communities to become members.

…and relax
Couchbase announced the general availability of Couchbase Server, and the formation of the Couchbase board of advisers, while J Chris Anderson outlined the details of the new release.

Best of the rest
# The Centre for Technology Policy Research published a review of the UK government’s track record when it comes to open source and open standards-related policies.

# As the Drizzle fork of MySQL reached general availability Brian Aker outlined the drivers behind its development and the technical details.

# The Qt team responded to the reporting of the sale of the commercial Qt business from Nokia to Digia.

# JasperSoft reported 50% growth in year-over-year sales, and a 30% increase in average customer contract size.

# Revolution Analytics announced a partnership with IBM Netezza.

# Pentaho announced the worldwide general availability of Pentaho BI Suite Enterprise Edition 3.8.

# Zenoss introduced Zenoss Datacenter Insight, providing analytics on physical, virtual, and cloud-based IT resources.

# 10gen released version 1.8 of its document database, including support for journaling and incremental MapReduce.

# Oracle released an update to MySQL Enterprise Edition, including integration with MyOracle support.

# Red Hat boasted of independent recognition of the strength of its patent portfolio, while it emerged that the company previously paid $4.2m to settle a patent infringement claim.

# Karmasphere and Canonical announced a partnership to support Karmasphere’s Hadoop-related products on Ubuntu.

# The Linux Foundation announced the formation of the MeeGo Smart TV Working Group.

# Amazon is launching an app store for Android applications.

# The results of the 2011 Eclipse board election.

# OpenERP launched its Apps library for open source business apps.

# The Eclipse Foundation launched the open beta of OrionHub.

# The Alembic Foundation was formed to create open source data sharing and management technologies for individuals.

# Juniper Networks joined the Eclipse Foundation.

# The 2011 Future of Open Source Survey, from North Bridge Venture Partners, The 451 Group and Computerworld is now live.

# Rhomobile launched RhoHub 3.0.

# Gluster joined the OpenStack community.

# Sirius launched 24×7 open source support

# eXo introduced eXo Platform 3.5 and launched eXo Cloud IDE.

# Cloud.com released a new version of CloudStack, its open source cloud computing platform.

# Media training will be available for developers at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit.

# InfoQ asked, What is the future of Apache Harmony?

# Richard Stallman said something mildly controversial about cell phones.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.02.18

Topics for this podcast:

*Infobright lights up machine-denerated data analytics
*CouchOne and Membase merge to form Couchbase
*DataStax adds onto Apache Cassandra-centered efforts
*Eucalyptus Systems grows enterprise partners, users
*The four pillars of openness

iTunes or direct download (24:51, 4.3MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.08

NoSQL vendors merge to form Couchbase. Funding for Basho and EnterpriseDB. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# NoSQL vendors CouchOne and Membase merged to form Couchbase, create open source distributed document database.

# EnterpriseDB increased its most recent fundraising round from $7.5m to $13.6m.

# Basho Technologies raised $7.5m in series D funding, as Danish IT company Trifork acquired an 8% stake in the company and became the European distributor for Riak.

# The FSF and the OSI responded to the DOJ’s request for more info on the Novell/CPTN patent deal.

# Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud is now available to the US federal government via Autonomic Resources.

# Gluster announced Gluster Virtual Storage Appliances for VMware and Amazon Web Services.

# Jaspersoft and SugarCRM announced a number of BI features available integrated with SugarCRM Pro or Enterprise.

# Novell is bundling SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability (HA) Extension with select HP systems.

# MuleSoft announced a private beta program for a new integration platform as a service called Mule iON.

# Actuate generated over $21.2m in BIRT-related business in 2010, bringing the total in the last 4 years to over $62.5m.

# Tuxera joined the Linux Foundation.

# Mandriva joined the Open Invention Network as licensee.

# Whamcloud entered into a partnership with Bull to accelerate the development of Lustre.

# VMware released Zimbra 7.

# DotNetNuke claimed to have tripled its customer base since the end of 2009 to over 1,000.

# Eric Baldeschwieler presented the backstory of Yahoo and Hadoop.

# Groklaw reported that UnXis has been selected as the buyer for the software product business of The SCO Group.

# Jason van Zyl maintained that Hudson has a bright future under Oracle, with Sonatype’s support.

CouchOne and Membase form Couchbase… and more

See our Too Much Information blog for our immediate reaction to the merger of open source database vendors CouchOne and Membase, as well as some interesting news related to Riak developer Basho Technologies.