451 Research perspectives on OpenStack and Amazon APIs

There’s been an interesting debate on the OpenStack cloud computing project and its API compatibility with Amazon. The discussion and debate over the open source cloud software’s compatibility with cloud leader Amazon’s proprietary APIs was just beginning when the 451 Group released The OpenStack Tipping Point in April. With the advancement of the OpenStack software and community — along with lingering questions about the desired level of compatibility with Amazon’s cloud — the matter is heating up. However, the issue of Amazon cloud compatibility is largely a non-issue.

Enterprise customers are focused on solving their computing and business challenges. They typically center on promptly providing their customers and internal users and divisions with adequate resources and infrastructure; speeding application development and deployment; and avoiding so-called “Shadow IT,” which normally involves use of Amazon’s cloud. Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

I’m not the only one with an opinion around here. My 451 Research colleagues have also weighed in on the matter and 451 Research subscribers can view their argument that Amazon API compatibility may be a fool’s errand.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2012.04.20

Topics for this podcast:

*OpenStack, Amazon, Eucalyptus and Citrix engage in open cloud warfare
*Microsoft spins off new company for openness
*Updates on automation players Puppet Labs and Opscode with Chef
*Percona turns attention to MySQL high availability
*Open APIs as the fifth pillar of modern IT openness

iTunes or direct download (28:42, 4.9MB)

Ubuntu on the move more than in decline

Ubuntu has been taking some criticism and heat for its falling Distrowatch rankings. I don’t doubt that after years of popularity, we’re finally seeing a bit of a return to the desktop Linux world of old when a new distribution shot up every week or month, then faded, then re-appeared … and so on. However, when I consider where Canonical and Ubuntu are heading, I question the significance of desktop OS standing and Distrowach rankings.

First off, I must say that Ubuntu’s slip off the ‘king of the hill’ game on Distrowatch came at the expense of Linux Mint, another polished, user-friendly Linux. It wouldn’t surprise me if some Ubuntu users may be migrating to Mint or other distributions largely out of frustration or dislike of the new Unity interface over the previous primary interface, Gnome. However, I think the move will be worth it in the long run to Ubuntu, as I’ll explain further.

If considering desktop OS, the most important aspect to me as an enterprise software analyst is enterprise desktop, and Ubuntu does well there. I’m sure there are plenty of shops running other flavors of Linux, including Mint, Gentoo, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Debian and many, many others, but for corporate desktop, the list quickly thins. Nevertheless, this is where Canonical has had some big victories, including the French police. In terms of consumer and user desktop PCs, the category itself is disappearing into converged and touch-capable devices, further distancing us from the ‘distro wars’ of the past.

Still, the server is where the real action and revenue from Linux exist. Here, Ubuntu still faces a role-reversal from most Linux distributions, using desktop and developer popularity to fuel its use as a server OS, which is also helped by free availability and cloud computing. Ubuntu continues to benefit from its early move to cloud computing and its popularity among developers, but also still faces a huge challenge in monetizing use. Significantly, the latest version, Ubuntu 11.10, incorporates support for OpenStack (or Eucalyptus) and VMware Cloud Foundry PaaS. This could be significant given what we’ve seen from this type of integration and bundling in the past. In addition, Ubuntu benefits from being among the select few Linux distribution that exist in both free, community and paid, commercial form. As reported in our special report, ‘The Changing Linux Landscape,’ the existence of an unpaid community cousin can help drive commercial growth for paid, subscription Linux, as we’ve seen happen with free Ubuntu and paid Ubuntu, as well as Fedora and RHEL and OpenSUSE and SLES.

Finally, the explosion of smartphones, tablets and converged devices — many of them running embedded Linux — makes clear there is more opportunity in these newer devices than in the desktop PCs of old. Ubuntu got a good start in netbooks and continues to be among the most advanced netbook operating systems. This should help its move to smartphones, tablets, other mobile devices, TVs and more and this is where the payoff of Unity occurs. Canonical with Ubuntu may have a real advantage as a user-friendly, mobile Linux OS that can be used by OEMs and carriers without the intellectual property stress that has marked Android, which has nonetheless laid the groundwork for mobile Linux in the industry. In the end, the pain of leaving Gnome has been significant, but the promise of where Ubuntu is headed seems worth that pain.

Canonical, Ubuntu broadening cloud coverage

Whether it’s been our discussion of unpaid, community Linux, the changing Linux landscape or cloud operating systems, we’ve always seen Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux as a major factor in the emerging cloud computing software market.

Canonical was the first Linux provider to so aggressively and prominently target cloud computing by its support and incorporation of the open source Eucalyptus cloud framework more than two years ago.

More recently, Canonical signaled a move with its next version of Ubuntu Server 11.10 will support a different cloud stack, the open source OpenStack software, as its default cloud platform. Eucalyptus will still be included in the Ubuntu distribution and will remain an option, which is key as we see the desire for multiple technologies and choices emerging as increasingly important to customers (the same thing seems to be happening with open source hypervisors Xen and KVM).

Given our coverage of the significance of open source in cloud computing and the importance of openness to customers moving into cloud computing, it is critical for vendors such as Canonical and technologies such as Ubuntu to be flexible in the other technologies and players with which they integrate.

That’s why it was even more impressive to see Canonical strike a deal with VMware. The two announced recently that Ubuntu 11.10 will also feature integration of and support for VMware’s Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS). This is yet another indicator of increased competition between VMware and Red Hat, which has its own version of PaaS in OpenShift. Regardless of the impact to its fellow Linux provider Red Hat, Canonical’s support for CloudFoundry is wise and positions Ubuntu as among the most flexible Linux distributions for cloud computing.

Canonical still faces significant challenges, primarily the monetization of developer, pilot and unpaid Ubuntu use and also its lack of pre-installation on server hardware from major OEMs. Nevertheless, the company manages to set itself apart from all other Linux providers in its continued focus on mobile and converged devices, as well. HP’s abandonment of the space and the idea of synergy between back end servers and mobile devices running the same OS is not much of a validation. However, it could also be an opportunity for Canonical, which is not burdened by the hardware business that became so painful for HP.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.26

Jive Software files for IPO. VMware adds Python and PHP to Cloud Foundry. And more.

# Jive Software filed for a $100m IPO.

# VMware launched the beta availability of Micro Cloud Foundry and announced that ActiveState and AppFog would be adding Python/Django and PHP respectively to the Cloudfoundry.org project.

# Meanwhile Salesforce.com’s Heroku added support for Java.

# Eucalyptus Systems announced the launch of Eucalyptus 3.

# EnterpriseDB announced the general availability of Postgres Enterprise Manager as well as the launch of Postgres Plus Cloud Server.

# MOSAID Technologies has filed a patent infringement complaint against Red Hat, as well as another complaint against IBM, Adobe, Alcatel-Lucent, Juniper Networks, NetApp and VMWare.

# The Outercurve Foundation announced the contribution of the OData Validation project.

# Rackspace Hosting announced the availability of professional training for OpenStack delivered by Rackspace Cloud Builders.

# Brian Proffitt did his research on GPL violations of the Linux kernel and found the sky is not falling.

# The Document Foundation announced the forthcoming election of its board of directors.

# Simon Phipps outlined the seven corporate steps towards software freedom.

# Icinga launched version 1.5 of its Nagios fork.

FLOSSmole has published a comparison of 24 software forges.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.27

Open Ocean raises $60m for OSS investments. Citrix mounts Olympus. And more.

# Venture capital firm Open Ocean Capital closed its Fund Three with $60m to invest in European start-ups deploying community and open source-related business models.

# Citrix Systems announced “Project Olympus,” a new cloud infrastructure product based on the OpenStack project.

# The Document Foundation provided an update on its progress and plans

# OpenLogic’s Exchange (OLEX) SaaS offering comprehensive governance and provisioning of open source software, now enables collaboration across the enterprise and the software supply chain.

# Acunu announced the public beta of its Acunu Storage Platform, based on Apache Cassandra, and released the Acunu Storage Core as open source software.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced Apache Libcloud as a top-level project.

# The FSFE provided an update on the continuing European court battles related to Microsoft’s violation of EU antitrust law.

# Kitenga announced the general availability of ZettaVox, its Hadoop-based search and analytics offering.

# BonitaSoft released version 5.5 of its Bonita Open Solution open source business process management software.

# Meanwhile eXo and BonitaSoft tightened integration between their respective BPM and document management products.

# Univa partnered with Eucalyptus Systems to enable organizations to integrate Eucalyptus’ cloud management software with Grid Engine compute environments.

# Digium announced that Skype for Asterisk will no longer be available after July 26.

# The Free Software Foundation published a guide to choosing a license for your own work.

# SUSE is now offering commercial support for the newly renamed Open Build Service.

# Henrik Ingo offered his thoughts on balancing control and community in open source-related business strategies.

# Glyn Moody discussed whether Amazon should start to pay it open source dues.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.20

Open Virtualization Alliance launches, Reforming the OSI. IBM targets Hadoop. And more.

# BMC Software, Eucalyptus, HP, IBM, Intel, Red Hat and SUSE created the Open Virtualization Alliance.

# The Open Source Initiative launched plans to encourage greater participation from the various open source industry stakeholders.

# The WSJ published a preview of IBM’s forthcoming Hadoop-related announcements.

# SQLStream raised $6m for its stream computing platform, based on Eigenbase.

# MongoLab raised $3m for its MongoDB hosting and services.

# Oracle introduced a new Java Specification Request to evolve the Java Community Process.

# DataStax hired former Quest executive Billy Bosworth as its new chief executive.

# Red Hat released Enterprise Linux 6.1.

# Attachmate’s SUSE business unit announced its plans under Nils Brauckmann.

# Bradley M Kuhn discussed Android in the context of GPL enforcement.

# The Fedora project switched to a new contributor agreement.

# OStatic argued that it is too early to count out Eucalyptus Systems.

# Openbravo added new Point of Sale capabilities to its ERP software.

# Martin Michlmayr discussed some lessons learned from Munich’s migration to Linux.

# Zanby has released the code for its enterprise groupware under the GNU GPL3 license.

# Wyse released a new Linux-based thin client.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.13

Google orders an Ice Cream Sandwich, hold the Honeycomb. Funding for WSO2 and Typesafe. And more.

# Google introduced Ice Cream Sandwich, attempted to defend the non-release of the source code for Honeycomb, and announced the launch of the Chromebook

# WSO2 closed $6.5m in growth financing provided by Quest Software and Intel Capital.

# Typesafe, formed to build a commercial company behind the Scala programming language, launched with $3m-backing from Greylock Partners.

# Yahoo won a jury verdict that it does not infringe a Linux-related patent.

# Canonical and Ubuntu developers decided to focus solely on OpenStack as the foundation for Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud.

# Mark Webbink provided his impressions of Oracle vs Google.

# Matt Asay encouraged Oracle to hurry up and embrace Hadoop.

# Talend became a sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation.

Canonical has reportedly joined the GENIVI Alliance and is creating a GENIVI-compliant Ubuntu IVI Remix.

# The Outercurve Foundation added a sixth project to its ASP.NET gallery.

# Openbravo claimed over two million downloads of its open source ERP software.

# Qt Labs provided a progress update on Qt 5.

# Royal Pingdom provided a list of the top 20 Linux desktop strongholds.

The four pillars of modern IT openness

Given our coverage regarding the impact of open source software on cloud computing, development and IT admin trends such as devops and the drivers of open source from the perspective of open source software users and customers, there’s no question open source software is the driving force of openness in today’s enterprise IT. Still, there are other factors emerging as significant. In fact, I see four pillars of openness that are relevant today, each at different stages and with shifting importance, but all with a role in what is or is not open in today’s enterprise IT.

*The first pillar is open source software itself, and it is perhaps the most established and strongest of them all. As referenced above, open source continues to play a growing role in the latest enterprise IT trends, and it is aligned with customer empowerment, which lends credence to the idea it will continue to grow and spread. Open source software and its principles have impacted nearly all discussions of ‘open’ and open source stands as the true measure of openness.

*The second pillar is represented by open standards, which have transformed from somewhat of a joke in open source circles to a more true representation of the term and the words. Rather than a single vendor’s effort to get a technology standard viewed as open, today’s open standards have to really be open. Why? The market no longer accepts open standards that are open in name only. True, there are still plenty of aspects to standards, even open standards, that makes them more closed than open, but the situation has generally improved, and with continuing customer empowerment, vendor collaboration and the influence of open source software driving standards that are truly more open for participation and community. We do wonder what types of standards will be open enough as we push further into cloud computing, devops and other driving trends, but the overall industry movement now seems to be toward openness in standards. It’s not just analysts saying so, either. The market dictates standards arguably more than anything esle, and the market now demands (almost all of the time) they are open.

*A third pillar of openness today is undoubtedly cloud computing, for which open source software and open standards are critical. The prevalence of Linux and a lot of other open source software is also apparent in some of the latest, interesting partnerships and integrations, such as Ubuntu distributor Canonical’s deal with Autonomic Resources for more channel business and Red Hat’s cloud computing pact with Eucalyptus Systems. We also continue to see signs that cloud computing is ‘giving back’ to open source software, primarily by making the separation of free and open source software available for free and for pay clearer via paid services and cloud access.

*The final pillar, and arguably the least evolved and mature, is open data. While open source software (particularly data-centric open source such as Hadoop), open standards and the role of openness in cloud computing have driven discussions of openness, data remains a source of lock-in according to users and a source of demand for closed technology according to users. In considering a concept such as Matt’s ‘total data,’ and some of the points raised in this post, I have no doubt there will be meaningful debates and moves to make data and data access more open in the industry. However, I also believe that the desire to continue to keep customers, the need to keep data closed (including privacy) and the nature of data will make open data the slowest to evolve. Nevertheless, it will eventually give way to the upside of shared data, collaboration, and a global market of not only goods and services, but also ideas. In doing so, open data will likely continue to be a pillar of openness in the modern IT landscape.

We will continue to watch these pillars of openness, and expect the significance of all four to continue as well, given their interconnection and importance to what both IT providers and consumers, particularly the successful ones, are doing today.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.04

The DOJ asks for more detail on Novell/CPTN deal. OpenStack releases Bexar. and more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# The DOJ asked Novell and CPTN for more information regarding the proposed patent sale.

# OpenStack announced the ‘Bexar’ code release and new members including Canonical and Cisco.

# Actuate reported $7.3m of BIRT-related business in Q4, up 12%, and $21.2m in FY2010, up 16%.

# Red Hat is among a number of vendors asking the U.S. Supreme Court to amend patent litigation rules.

# Cloudera secured a strategic investment and development agreement with In-Q-Tel.

# Lucid Imagination claimed 150 customers following doubled sales growth in 2010.

# Simon Phipps rated the new proposed OpenJDK governance against his open-by-rule benchmark.

# MADlib is a new open source library for in-database analytics available with EMC Greenplum CE.

# Simon Phipps assessed the impact of copyright ownership on software procurement negotiations.

# Cloudera and Quest Software announced the availability of OraOop 1.1 and OraHive 1.0.

# Convirture and Eucalyptus are partnering to integrate ConVirt 2.0 Enterprise with Eucalyptus open source and EE.

# Canonical announced the US availability of Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud on Dell PowerEdge C2100 and C6100 servers.

# eBay launched a new open source projects page and released the Turmeric SOA development platform.

# Sauce Labs introduced Selenium 2 support as part of its cloud application testing service.

# Enea joined the Linux Foundation and formed a new partnership with Timesys.

# Sonatype CEO Wayne Jackson said the company remains committed to Hudson.

# The eZ Publish content management system is now available as SaaS via Granite Horizon.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.01.21

Topics for this podcast:

*Black Duck update, latest acquisition Olliance Group
*New growth and closed source add-on plans for 10gen
*VC investment for open source vendors up in 2010
*Open source profitability discussed
*Is cloud computing opening up?

iTunes or direct download (24:49, 4.3MB)

Is cloud computing opening up?

We’ve already identified the significance of open source software to cloud computing, based on the cloud stacks from large IaaS, PaaS and other providers, on the most popular projects used for public, private and hybrid clouds and on the traction of key open source pieces such as Linux, Xen, KVM, Apache Tomcat, Hadoop, PHP, Ruby and many others. We’ve also discussed how open source is playing a role not only in the technology, but in the discussions, debates and overall evolution of cloud computing. While we believe the continued use and growth of critical open source pieces in cloud computing will contribute to a more open cloud ecosystem and market, we actually saw some evidence of this recently with word that the next Ubuntu Linux from Canonical will support not only the Eucalyptus cloud framework, but also the ever-popular OpenStack technology, project and community.

We wondered recently about the impact of a cloud partnership between Red Hat and Eucalyptus Systems, which also works closely with Canonical for its Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. In a recent discussion, Marten Mickos told me Eucalyptus Systems fully expects and supports Canonical’s moves toward another cloud framework, OpenStack. While Canonical’s strategy probably has as much to do with customer demand, particularly for cloud flexibility, as it does with responding to rivals’ moves and deals, I believe that both the Red Hat partnership with Eucalyptus Systems and Canonical’s support for multiple, open source cloud computing frameworks signal a more open cloud computing market that is evolving. Customers are prioritizing flexibility and portability, and open source represents both perceived and real mechanisms for providing it. We’ve seen similar support from rival vendors on the operating system and hypervisor, most notably with Red Hat and Microsoft on virtualization, and I expect we’ll see this repeated with other vendors and technologies in cloud computing.

Sure there is still the question of how open is open enough, but the latest activity is truly good news for users of open source software and customers of open source vendors, who will benefit from this cross-project, cross-cloud platform support, collaboration and perhaps, community.

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.14

Bid for Novell patents still on. Google drops H.264. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# The withdrawal of CPTN Holding proposal to acquire Novell’s patents is purely procedural, said Microsoft.

# Karsten Gerloff explained why the FSFE is concerned about the sale of Novell’s patents to CPTN.

# Google announced plans to support WebM and Theora in Chrome and Chromium, and drop H.264.

# Pentaho said it added 400 new customers in 2010. Bookings up 120%.

# Microsoft updated WebMatrix as a a set of tools to create new websites from open source applications.

# C12G Labs launched its HPCcloud.com specialized support services program.

# Green Energy Corp launched the Total Grid open source smart grid community.

# David Skok explored the MySQL approach to sales and marketing with former VP of worldwide sales Lesley Young.

# Sacha Labourey shared his thoughts and some context on Hudson/Jenkins.

# Florent Guillaume explained why Nuxeo dropped JCR.

# Eucalyptus Systems claimed one in five of the Fortune 100 started a Eucalyptus cloud in 2010.

# Penguin Computing’s Scyld ClusterWare now supports SUSE Linux Enterprise.

Red Hat reaches for clouds with interesting Eucalyptus deal

It was interesting to see a partnership announcement between Red Hat and Eucalyptus Systems, commercial supporter of the Eucalyptus cloud computing framework. Why so interesting? Mainly because there are several, significant competitive, partnership and technology implications from the deal.

First off, we’re been waiting for a more pronounced response from Eucalyptus Systems to OpenStack, the open source cloud computing stack backed initially by Rackspace and NASA and supported by a growing cast of both open source and non-open source players. We’ve also wondered about the competitive implications of OpenStack for Red Hat, which despite previously being sharply focused on the enterprise server market, is now working hard to extend into cloud computing, service providers and Paas, as evidenced also by its recent acquisition of Makara, which was a Eucalyptus Systems partner. Thus, the Red Hat-Eucalyptus partnership may be in part a response to OpenStack on the part of either or both partners.

The pairing is also interesting since Eucalyptus Systems has long worked closely with Ubuntu Linux distributor Canonical, which relies on the open source Eucalyptus software for its Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. While Canonical has not presented much of a threat to Red Hat and its RHEL in the overall enterprise server market, the same cannot be said for cloud computing, where Canonical was first to address cloud computing users and also benefits from the popularity of Ubuntu in both public and private clouds and among developers. So it will be intersting to see whether Eucalyptus Systems’ partnership with Red Hat has any impact on Canonical’s own partnership with Eucalyptus Systems or use of Eucalyptus software.

There are also other significant Eucalyptus Systems partners that come into play, particularly the recently-launched NRE Alliance, a coalition of newScale, rPath and Euaclyptus Systems for self-service private and hybrid clouds, as covered in a 451 Group report. Additional Eucalyptus partners that make its partnership with Red Hat and its progress even more interesting: Convirture, Dell, GroundWork Open Source, HP, Membase, Novell, Puppet Labs, Rightscale, rPath, Terracotta, Vmware and Zmanda.

Finally, it’s interesting yet again to note that we may be seeing some response to the fact that much of the Linux that is used in cloud computing is unpaid, community Linux, such as CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu, which is frequently a leader among Linux distributions, whether public or private clouds. The good news for Red Hat is that we are seeing Fedora among these community editions among Linux in the clouds. The use of unpaid, community Linux by many cloud users — particularly those testing and building privte and hybrid clouds — also highlights the monetization and commercialization challenges faced by Linux vendors here, particularly cloud leader Canonical.

Back to the Red Hat-Eucalyptus deal, we have no question we will continue to see interesting partnerships form among Linux and other open source software vendors and others as they all come together in the clouds.

451 CAOS Links 2010.12.15

Google contributes WindowBuilder to Eclipse. Backdoors in OpenBSD? And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Google contributed WindowBuilder and CodePro Profiler to the Eclipse Foundation.

# Oracle is in another Java legal battle, this time with Myriad Group.

# Are there US Government backdoors in OpenBSD? One alleged FBI plant denies involvement.

# Puppet Labs released MCollective version 1.0 following its acquisition of The Marionette Collective.

# Eucalyptus partnered with Red Hat on Eucalyptus support for RHEV and compatibility with Apache Deltacloud.

# Gazzang last week raised $3.5m for software to secure open source software for use in the cloud.

# Richard Stallman warned against Google’s Chrome OS.

# Lucid Imagination announced the general availability and free download for LucidWorks Enterprise.

# The openSUSE project announced the appointment of Alan Clark as openSUSE board chair.

# Black Duck adding IBM Rational AppScan Source Edition to its code-scanning assessment services.

# The Apache Software Foundation launched the Apache Extras hosting site for complementary projects.

# Karmasphere integrated Apache Hive with the Karmasphere Application Framework to create Karmasphere Analyst.

# WSO2 launched WSO2 Application Server 4.0 with full Apache Tomcat support.

# CloudBees acquired Java PaaS provider Stax Networks.

# Facebook explained how it uses Hadoop and released the code of its internal distribution.

# NEC and Novell created a high availability offering optimized for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

# Dries Buytaert explained how Drupal benefits from VC funding.

# Canonical, GENIVI, HP, LiMo Foundation and MontaVista Software are to become advisers to Linaro.

# Bill Burke welcomed the ASFs departure from the JCP, blames the ASF for Java 7 delay.

# The Linux Foundation appointed OpenEmbedded core developer and Yocto Project maintainer Richard Purdie as a Fellow.

# C12G Labs announced version 2.0 OpenNebulaPro, based on the OpenNebula Toolkit.

451 CAOS Links 2010.11.02

JCP election results. Funding for Acquia and Continuent. Fedora 14. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# The Java Community Process election results are in.

# Acquia closed an $8.5m series C funding round and announced that it has tripled its customer base in 2010.

# Continuent appointed Robert Hodges CEO and confirmed details of $5m funding from Aura Capital.

# Red Hat announced the availability of Fedora 14.

# Apple filed two patent infringement lawsuits against Motorola in relation to Android.

# Carlo Daffara updated his analysis of the Java code Oracle claims was copied into Android.

# An open letter to the JCP Executive Committee calling for JCP reform.

# Jono Bacon provided some clarification on Canonical’s Unity plans.

# Informatica partnered with Cloudera to enable integration with Hadoop.

# Andy Updegrove discussed the lessons developers can learn from OpenOffice and Java.

# Jaspersoft claimed 100 cloud BI customer deployments.

# Symbian is set to receive investment of over €22m from the EC’s Artemis project.

# Stormy Peters is stepping down as executive director of the Gnome Foundation to join Mozilla.

# Coverity announced the results of the Coverity Scan 2010 Open Source Integrity Report.

# James Dixon explained the difficulty in comparing open source and proprietary software markets.

# More than 30 OpenOffice,org developers have resigned from the project.

# The Eclipse Foundation announced Eclipse Virgo 2.1, a light-weight application server for OSGi applications.

# The Motley Fool’s Seth Jayson examined Red Hat’s cash flow.

# The November issue of the Open Source Business Resource is now available.

# RightScale’s Private Cloud Early Access Program supports deploying private clouds using Cloud.com or Eucalyptus.

# Opensource.com published open innovation and open source innovation: what do they share and where do they differ?

# Zend Technologies announced the general availability of Zend Framework 1.11.

# The Outercurve Foundation is changing its bylaws and governance.

# Giuseppe Maxia announced that he is leaving Oracle’s MySQL team, and joining Continuent as director of quality assurance.

451 CAOS Links 2010.10.08

Patents! Patents! Patents! Canonical’s perfect 10. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Google responded to Oracle’s claims that its Android OS infringes copyrights and patents related to Java.

# Matt Asay evaluated the various patent claims against Android and its related devices.

# Microsoft licensed smartphone patents from ACCESS Co and a subsidiary of Acacia Research.

# Glyn Moody assessed what Microsoft’s patent claim against Motorola says about Microsoft.

# Canonical announced that Ubuntu 10.10 Server Edition andUbuntu 10.10 Desktop and Netbook Editions will be available for download on 10/10/10.

# Puppet Labs acquired The Marionette Collective.

# Acquia added support for memcached to its Acquia Hosting platform.

# Royal Pingdom provided an overview of the mobile Linux landscape.

# Opengear expanded its remote management of Avaya VoIP systems.

# MuleSoft announced the availability of Tcat Server 6 R4.

# ActiveState announced the availability of Komodo IDE 6.

# Rivet Logic launched the Confluence Alfresco Integration rivet which integrates Atlassian Confluence with Alfresco.

# What is the future of MapReduce and Hadoop in the light of Google’s Percolator and Caffeine?

# Lucid Imagination announced LucidWorks Enterprise built on Solr/Lucene.

# Twitter described its new Lucene-based search architecture.

# newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus named their private cloud coalition The NRE Alliance.

# Andy Updegrove reflected on the ways in which open source is stronger post-SCO than it was pre-SCO.

# Joe Harris provided an overview of the open source BI/DW landscape and offers suggestions for covert adoption.

# Roberto Galoppini published his notes from the OWF Open Source Analyst Summit.

# Evident Software’s ClearStone 4.5 now covers Apache Cassandra and Memcached.

# Mercury released OpenSAL, an open source scientific Algorithm Library for vector math acceleration.

# What does the sale of Ohloh.net mean for the future of Geeknet?

# Autonomic Resources added Continuent and EnterpriseDB to its GSA schedule roster.

# The VAR Guy’s sources said Microsoft Hyper-V will likely gain some integrations with OpenStack.

# OTRS launched an OnDemand version of its open source help desk and IT service management software.

# Digital Reasoning and Riptano partnered on Cassandra-based analytics.

# Outercurve added a fifth project to its ASP.NET Open Source Gallery.

# GoAhead Software shipped the general release of OpenSAFfire 6.0.

# Citrix updated XenServer with new storage optimization technology for VDI.

# Simon Phipps noted that there is a difference between forking and rehosting.

# Fonality updated its cloud-based, open source IP PBX software with the 2010.2 release.

# enStratus and Opscode partnered to provide enStratus customers with the Opscode Platform.

# Amazon introduced read replicas to its MySQL-based Amazon Relational Database Service.

New 451 Group Special Report-Open Source Seeds the Clouds

There are a number of cloud computing events and announcements taking place — VMworld, a countering announcement from Citrix, and recent partnership among rPath, newScale and Eucalyptus Systems for private and hybrid clouds — that we believe are indicative of the significant role and impact open source software is having in cloud computing — a topic we cover in depth in a new 451 Group special report, Seeding the Clouds, which is a collaboration of our CAOS and CloudScape practices.

By considering the open source pieces and players that constitute much of the infrastructure and underpinnings of cloud services from major providers Amazon, Google, Rackspace, VMware and Terremark, we analyzed they key pieces prevalent across them all and also picked out patterns that we are seeing repeated in the broader cloud computing market. We also consider how these larger vendors are playing a role in the rise of open source pieces and commercial supporters, which are finding opportunity among several categories of customers, including enterprise and service provider cloud users.

For example, the recently announced OpenStack from Rackspace, NASA and host of other partners (covered on the CAOS Theory blog and in a 451 Group report, is something we anticipate we’ll see more of in the form of greater participation, opening of code and open source-centered initiatives. We also expect both response to these efforts and other initiatives that offer more open alternatives to existing, unofficial standards such as VMware and Amazon. One such example announced after the writing of the report is the initiative for self service private and hybrid clouds among rPath, newScale and Eucalyptus Systems with the systems integration heft of Momentum SI.

As stated, the response and competition is not limited to the open offerings, as we see a variety of large cloud and IT services providers understanding and appreciating the value of communities: Amazon, Oracle, VMware and even Microsoft, which as we discuss in the report is among other cloud providers in its use of and participation with the PHP community. Citrix is another example, and it’s evident the company believes openness in the cloud is a good thing based on its Citrix OpenCloud announcement and focus on ‘Open Cloud,’ (which also coincides with its acquisition of virtualization management vendor VMLogix).

We also expect VMware and others to continue to increase their involvement and strategy with open source software for cloud computing, and would highlight the prevalance of open source software now within VMware (SpringSource, Hyperic, Zimbra, for example) and its prominence at VMWorld this week.

While there will certainly be challenges, including the maturity, evolution and learning from open source we are seeing and expect more of from larger, non-open source competitors, we expect more open source code and commercial supporters in enterprise and service provider cloud markets for some time. For customers, the competition, not only between open source and proprietary vendors, but also within open source and in partnerships and collaborations, and presence of open source in the cloud mean additional options and value — another reason we expect open source to maintain its prominent place in the clouds.

451 CAOS Links 2010.08.27

Red Hat takes a PaaS at the cloud. Novell’s Linux revenues slide. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Red Hat outlined its PaaS strategy as part of its Cloud Foundations portfolio.

# Red Hat submitted the API specification for Apache Deltacloud to the Distributed Management Task Force.

# Novell reported (PDF) Linux platform product revenue of $35.5m in Q3, down 7.1%. Total revenue was $199m, down 7.9%.

# Simon Phipps asked whether open source communities should avoid contributor agreements.

# OpenGeo announced the release of OpenGeo Suite Cloud Edition.

# UK councilor, Liam Maxwell, said central govt is holding up adoption of OSS, councils could save at least £51m.

# Sacha Labourey launched CloudBees, offering PaaS for Java applications based on Hudson Continuous Integration.

# Simon Phipps said “which open source licence” is the wrong question.

# Matt Asay asked “can open source be saved from itself?”

# Motorola has reportedly acquired 280 North – creators of open source Cappuccino app framework – for $20m.

# Marten Mickos explained Eucalyptus Systems’ perspective on the NASA/OpenStack brouhaha.

# Carlo Daffara explained the intricacies involved in open source software license selection.

# Colosa released the enterprise edition of its ProcessMaker BPM software.

# Eucalyptus Systems released version 2.0 of its open source private cloud software.

# ZDNet reported on the importance of VMware to Novell.

# ReadWriteWeb explained why Large Hadron Collider scientists are using CouchDB.

# Diaspora, the “open source Facebook” will launch on September 15.

# Simon Phipps explained why GNU/Linux is finally Free software.

VC funding for OSS-related vendors up 11.5% in Q2

Venture capital funding for open source software-related vendors increased 11.5% in the second quarter, the third consecutive quarter of positive growth following a 6% rise in 4Q09 and a 38% increase in 1Q10.

According to our preliminary figures, OSS-related vendors raise $141.7m in Q2, compared to $127.1m a year ago. There were 21 deals in the quarter and 20 with a disclosed deal size, the same as 2Q09, resulting in an average deal size of $7.1m in 2Q10, compared with $6.4m in 2Q09.

Early stage deals announced in the quarter included $5m for Karmasphere and $2.5m for Datameer, both building businesses around Hadoop, as well as $7.15m for Moodlerooms, $14m for Sencha, $4m for AlienVault and an additional $3.3m for Nuxeo.

Later stage deals included $11m each for Cloud.com and Opscode, $10m each for Heroku, DeviceVM and Northscale, $9m for Zend, and $8m for Talend.

The biggest round announced in the quarter was Eucalyptus’s $20m series B round, which was reported just hours before the end of the quarter, tipping the total into positive growth.

Total funding for the first half of the year stands at $231.2m, up from $191.7m in the first half of 2009. While it seems likely that we could see an overall improvement for the full year compared to 2010 we are sticking to our prediction of flat growth for the full year.