Mixed signals in IT’s great war over IP

Recent news that Microsoft and Barnes & Noble agreed to partner on the Nook e-reader line rather than keep fighting over intellectual property suggests the prospect of more settlement and fewer IP suits in the industry. However, the deal further obscures the blurry IP and patent landscape currently impacting both enterprise IT and consumer technology.

It is good to see settlement — something I’ve been calling for, while also warning against patent and IP aggression. However, this settlment comes from the one conflict in this ongoing war that was actually shedding some light on the matter, rather than further complicating it.

See the full article at TechNewsWorld.

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.06

Data.gov goes open source. GridGain raises $2.5m And more.

# The White House is set to open source Data.gov as open government data platform.

# GridGain closed $2.5m series A funding.

# Digital Reasoning raised an undisclosed series B funding round.

# Contrary to some reports, Google and Mozilla are still negotiating their search and advertising deal.

# Jedox introduced version 3.3 of its BI suite, changing the name of the premium edition from Palo to Jedox.

# MapR announced version 1.2 of the MapR Distribution for Apache Hadoop.

# Xamarin released Mono for Android 4.0.

# Splunk introduced Shep, an open source project that enables two-way Splunk-Hadoop integration.

# HPCC Systems is now providing its Thor Data Refinery Cluster on the Amazon Web Services platform.

# Monty Program previewed some features in forthcoming versions of MariaDB.

# AppDynamics partnered with Datastax to provide application performance management for distributed applications running on Apache Cassandra.

# Gorilla Logic announced the latest version of FoneMonkey for iOS

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.18

Rapid7 secures new funding. Microsoft drops Dryad. And more.

# Rapid7 secured $50m in series C funding.

# Microsoft confirmed that it is ditching its Dryad project in favour of Apache Hadoop.

# Arun Murthy provided more details of Apache Hadop 0.23.

# The Google Plugin for Eclipse and GWT Designer projects are now fully open source.

# openSUSE released version 12.1.

# Amazon released the source code of the Kindle Fire.

# Black Duck Software joined the GENIVI Alliance.

# dotCloud announced the availability of the top three databases MySQL, MongoDB and Redis on its PaaS.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.15

Funding for Vyatta and Hortonworks. Ice Cream Sandwich source code. And more.

# Vyatta raised $12m in new funding from HighBAR Partners and existing investors JPMorgan, Arrowpath Venture Partners and Citrix Systems.

# Index Ventures announced that it has invested in Hortonworks, reportedly as part of a substantial B round.

# Google released the source code to Ice Cream Sandwich.

# SugarCRM announced billings growth of 69% in Q3

# Apache Hadoop 0.23 has been released.

# Revolution Analytics announced the general availability of Revolution R Enterprise 5.0.

# Adobe and the Spoon Foundation are working together to donate the Flex SDK to an established open source foundation.

# Glyn Moody explained why Barnes & Noble is an open source hero.

# Red Hat added support for Jenkins, Maven and integration with JBoss Tools to its OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service.

# Zend Technologies announced the general availability of Zend Studio 9.0.

# WSO2 updated both the WSO2 Carbon enterprise middleware platform and WSO2 Stratos cloud middleware platform.

# Mozilla published Mozilla Public License Version 2.0, Release Candidate 2.

# DigitalPersona open sourced its new FingerJetFX fingerprint feature extraction technology.

# AquaFold launched AquaClusters.com, a new social collaboration tool for software developers that is free for open source developers.

# Xyratex joined Open Scalable File Systems (OpenSFS) as a formal member.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.11

B&N asks DoJ to investigate Microsoft patent tactics. Fedora 16. And more.

# Barnes & Noble asked the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate Microsoft’s patent-licensing tactics.

# The team behind Strobe is moving to Facebook. Sproutcore will continue as an independent project.

# The UK government’s Cabinet Office dispelled concerns about the security of open source software.

# The Fedora Project announced the availability of Fedora 16.

# Google offered support to Android firms in lawsuits.

# HStreaming updated its scalable continuous data analytics platform built on Hadoop.

# Dell is releasing its Apache Hadoop Crowbar barclamps as open source software.

# ActiveState added new management and monitoring features to ActiveState Stackato.

# Talend provided information on all contributions made by Talend to open source community projects.

# StackIQ announced the availability of Rocks+ 6.

The downside of Microsoft’s Android dollars

There’s been a lot of attention on the amount of money Microsoft is making from Android, including Microsoft’s own proclamations. Maybe it’s just that I’m more of a fan of Linux and open source software, or maybe I’m overly focused on the lawsuits and threats against Android, but I see serious downsides to all of those dollars for Microsoft from Android.

I believe Microsoft’s strategy to pursue patent licensing deals rather than sue, as we’ve seen from Apple, may prove to be a more effective strategy. Rather than limit or destroy Android, Microsoft is actually supporting its growth, meaning more Android devices and users in the market. Since it’s making so much money from Android, Microsoft may be less interested in limiting or attacking it, so that’s a benefit to Android. However, I do see some significant drawbacks to Microsoft’s Android strategy, all of which serve to limit Microsoft’s opportunity in the future.

First, Microsoft’s Android licensing is a validation of Android. Many if not most of the companies using Android that are also Microsoft licensees all seem to be doing well enough and making enough money to go ahead and pay Microsoft’s licensing fees. This highlights Android’s growth and spread, which is tied to significant market gains for companies such as HTC, Samsung and Verizon. One might argue that Microsoft’s Android licensing revenue will similarly rise with the Linux-based mobile operating system’s growth, but I don’t see that happening, and the second drawback I discuss next is the reason.

Second, we’ve already seen Samsung working to sidestep technology and patents in question that have caused courtroom fights or market bans around the world. I expect all of Microsoft’s Android licensees are working to similarly work around technology in question, so there is a shelf life on Microsoft’s IP licensing business. The details of these patent deals are not public to us, but the companies that agree to them have a much better handle on which technology is problematic since they’re the ones signing. I expect we will see these deals peak at some point and over time, they will become less relevant to Android backers and less lucrative to Microsoft. In addition, for all of the criticisms regarding its openness, Android has a global, open source development community behind it. That means it will be able to compete, innovate and work around things quickly. Those workarounds will likely make their way into the greater Android community so that supposed patent infringements will decline and eventually disappear.

The third drawback is a matter of pride. At the same time Samsung officials signaled an effort to sidestep IP-sensitive technologies and issues, a Samsung executive expressed concern that these patent suits and fights may come at the expense of pride in brand and company. I couldn’t agree more. It really does say something if Microsoft is making more money from IP licensing of non-Microsoft technology than from its own work in smartphones — perhaps the hottest technology market on the planet right now. Consumers may not be aware of or care about lawsuits, license deals or pride, but developers do.

Given some new indications there may be a change at Apple and a bridge to Samsung whereby settlement, progress and choice take priority over market bans and destruction of an ecosystem, these drawbacks for Microsoft may be even more significant going forward.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.21

Google unwraps Ice Cream Sandwich. Source code to follow. And more.

# Google and Samsung unveiled Galaxy Nexus, the first phone designed for Android 4.0, also known as Ice Cream Sandwich.

# Meanwhile Google indicated that it plans to publish the Ice Cream Sandwich source code soon after it is available on devices.

# BonitaSoft announced that it has surpassed one million downloads and now has more than 250 customers.

# Gemini Technologies joined the OpenStack community, bringing its Amazon S3 compatibility, provisioning and billing APIs to OpenStack.

# Canonical re-aligned its corporate and professional services.

# The Document Foundation announced the preliminary results of its board election.

# Cloudera released CDH3 update 2, adding Apache Mahout to its Cloudera Distribution Including Apache Hadoop.

# Cloudera also announced the new Cloudera University brand for its training and certification programs.

# Zend Technologies announced phpcloud.com and a partnership with 10gen including the integration of the MongoDB PHP driver with Zend Server

# Hadapt reportedly closed an $8m series A financing round – or is that $9.5m

# Bacula Systems announced the availability of its Linux bare metal restore feature.

# Virtustream added support for Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization to its xStream cloud platform

# The Outercurve Foundation announced the acceptance of the .Net Bio project into the Research Accelerators Gallery.

# ForgeRock announced a partnership with Radiant Logic to join RadiantOne’s Virtual Directory Server and OpenAM.

# OStatic published an introduction to Amdatu, an open cloud platform powered by Apache.

# Talend announced an expanded OEM partner program.

New mobile Linux efforts reminiscent of old

Amid continued traction for Android, there have been a number of other developments for mobile operating systems based on Linux. Given my support for and belief in Linux and open source software, you might expect me to be bullish on the prospects for all of this mobile and device Linux. However, based on what I’ve seen in the past in terms of mergers, reshuffles and strategic restarts, I believe the introduction of the Tizen Linux-based OS is reminiscent of a time when mobile Linux wasn’t really moving ahead.

Almost three years ago, I wrote in 451 Group’s report,’Mobility Matters,’ that in spite of previous false starts and maneuvers — similar to the ones we’re seeing right now — mobile Linux and open source software were finally poised to break out of niche use. I saw potential in the LiMO Founation, Palm’s webOS, and particularly Android.

More recently came the introduction of Tizen. Though the Tizen project is backed by the Linux Foundation, the LiMO Foundation, and industry leaders including Intel and Samsung, it is a jolt to mobile Linux and open source developers since it effectively ends the MeeGo OS and project.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.07

OpenStack Foundation. New Pentaho CEO. And more.

# Rackspace announced its intention to form an independent OpenStack Foundation.

# HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system for its Public Cloud.

# Pentaho appointed Quentin Gallivan as its new CEO.

# Hortonworks continued the discussion about contributions to Apache Hadoop.

# Bob Bickel explained why CloudBees is not, itself, open source.

# Google announced the limited preview release of Google Cloud SQL.

# Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges joined the Linux Foundation.

# Dave Neary discussed the different types of community in relation to the Tizen project.

# Akamai joined the OpenStack community.

# Daniel Abadi provided his perspective on Oracle’s NoSQL Database.

# One more thing…
Apple’s relationship with open source may be somewhat tenuous – Paul Rooney provides some background – but given the impact Steve Jobs has made on the industry as a whole it seems wrong not to mark his passing in some way. We’ll leave the words to the company he created.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.16

Google says Hello Moto. A GPL violation that hasn’t actually occurred. And more.

# Google announced plans to acquire Motorola Mobility for $12.5bn, adding an Android handset business and more than 17,000 patents.

# Fabrizio Capobianco speculated that the acquisition represents the end of Android as we know it.

# Meanwhile IP lawyer Edward Naughton continued his Android-bothering by raising the question of GPL compliance and Android device manufacturers unlicensed.

# In response Bradley M. Kuhn noted that Naughton has not identified a GPL violation that actually occurred, while Carlo Daffara pointed out that the GPL portions of Android Honeycomb have been in the AOSP git tree from late January.

# Joyent announced that it had ported KVM to its SmartOS operating system.

# SGI acquired open source computational fluid dynamics software player OpenCFD Ltd.

# Mozilla launched the release candidate draft of Mozilla Public License, version 2.0.

# Rhomobile announced Rhodes 3.1, the latest updates of its native smartphone app framework.

# Karsten Wade called for the formation of a working group on community metrics.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.05

Google and Microsoft trade patent claims. Actuate announces Q2 results. And more.

# Google accused Microsoft, Oracle, Apple and other companies of organising a hostile patent campaign against Android. That prompted Microsoft executives to claim that Microsoft invited Google to be involved in the CPTN purchase of Novell’s patents. However, Google explained that joining CPTN might have decreased its ability to defend itself against potential patent claims.

# Actuate announced its Q2 financial results, including BIRT-related license business of $5.3m, up 130% year-over-year.

# Dell and Cloudera announced a combined hardware, software, support and services offering for Apache Hadoop.

# France and Tunisia have signed a joint declaration on governmental cooperation on open source software.

# Mitchell Baker explained the Mozilla Foundation’s Gecko project.

# VisionMobile published a report assessing the relative openness of Android, MeeGo, Linux, Qt, WebKit, Mozilla, Eclipse and Symbian.

# Sandro Groganz published an article on the benefits of the community for partners of open source vendors.

# Twitter announced plans to release its Storm distributed stream processing software as an open source project.

# Georg Greve discussed his perspective on freedom in the cloud.

# MySQL performance specialist Percona celebrated its fifth birthday, now with 50 employees and 1,200 customers.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.29

Open Cloud Initiative launches. HP joins OpenStack. Oracle releases Java 7. And more.

# The Open Cloud Initiative launched to drive open standards in cloud computing.

# HP announced its support for OpenStack.

# Oracle announced the availability of Java SE 7. The Apache Software Foundation warned of index corruption and crashes in Apache Lucene and Solr.

# Nebula launched with plans for a turnkey OpenStack hardware appliance.

# Concurrent raised $900K in seed funding for Hadoop-based workflow engine.

# Couchbase and SQLite teamed up to create UnQL (Unstructured Query Language), a new data query language for unstructured data.

# Couchbase released a developer preview of Couchbase Server 2.0, combining CouchDB and Membase.

# OpenLogic published its scorecard to assess how well a particular Platform-as-a-Service offering meets the standard of ‘open’.

# Brian Proffitt asked can a commercial vendor lead a project as openly as a foundation?

# Gluster announced the Gluster Connector for OpenStack.

# Google released its LevelDB key value storage engine using the BSD license.

# SkySQL introduced SkySQL Recovery Manager, a MySQL backup and recovery offering powered by Zmanda.

# Metasploit announced the launch of Metasploit Pro 4.0.

# WANdisco partnered with CloudBees to offer Jenkins with WANdisco’s uberSVN application lifecycle management platform for Apache Subversion.

# Brian Proffitt reported on how innovation is the new draw of open source.

The open card in the mobile game

I wrote last year about the way Google’s Android mobile operating system was serving as a more open alternative to Apple’s iOS, but not so open that it didn’t leave opportunity for an even more open alternative.

Given that we continue to see software patent-based attacks on Android, as well as swirling FUD around coverage of the attacks and never ending suits and settlements and courtroom developments, it is clear it will be a long time before any of this legal business is ever close to settled, unless ended by settlements first, which is likely.

However, I’m more interested in the technology in the meantime. I also think it’s interesting to see, if not a ‘more open’ alternative emerging, at least another, ‘somewhat open’ option in the tablet market, this being HP’s WebOS. It’s interesting that WebOS evolved from Palm, which HP acquired in March 2010 for $1.4 billion. Though Apple’s iPad is still the clear leader in tablets, it is interesting to see continuing signs that what happened in smartphones (where iPhone led and Android quickly caught up and then passed iOS) may be happening in tablets. There is also still the possibility that tablets may play out like netbooks, with wild popularity followed by a fade in favor of more traditional PCs for traditional PC needs. It is interesting to note that Google’s Eric Schmidt recently commented on the continued utility of PCs, which will remain key to professionals, consumers, and also developers, largely because of the tactical keyboard. What is most likely is continued convergence, and it will be interesting to see what ties emerge between WebOS and PCs as computer hardware giant HP rolls out the OS in tablets and smartphones.

We also see other signs that new, open entrants may be mixing things up in the mobile and converged device market, such as word of a possible Android and iOS competitor from Mozilla. There is yet another project that is already a factor in netbooks, other mobile devices and the burgeoning IT market of automobile information and entertainment systems, MeeGo, which is also open source. Even Research in Motion’s Playbook is based on the QNX operating system, for which source code was made available by its previous owner to make it more like the open source Linux OS, which was attracting developers and interesting customers.

We believed there was a fairly prominent place for open source software, open source operating systems and general openness in mobile software when we wrote our report, Mobility Matters three years ago, but we would have never guessed that the openness of this software would be so significant in two respects: defense from patent and other intellectual property attacks; the market power of open source, which draws in not only developers, but manufacturers and other third-parties. We’ve seen the speed and strength at which a project and community such as Android can grow. Will we now begin to see other alternatives that are even more open emerge as top choices among developers, hardware companies, wireless players and consumers? Never before have those alternatives really existed in the mobile software world, so it’s good at least to see the possibility is there.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.15

IBM offers Symphony to Apache OpenOffice. Jaspersoft raises $11m. And more.

# IBM announced that it will offer the Symphony source code to the Apache OpenOffice incubator for consideration. Bob Sutor explained how and why.

# Jaspersoft raised $11m in funding from Quest Software, Red Hat, SAP Ventures, Doll Capital Management, Morgenthaler Ventures, Partech International, Scale Venture Partners, and Adams Street Partners.

# The judge overseeing Oracle and Google’s intellectual property lawsuit said it is possible Google knew of its Java violation.

# SAP joined the OpenJDK project.

# Savio Rodrigues speculated that vSphere 5 licensing could open the door for open source.

# Simon Phipps rounded up reaction to the Harmony Project agreements and added his own perspective.

# The Zenoss Community Alliance was formed to revitlatize, and possibly fork, Zenoss Core.

# Gluster named Rob Bearden to its board of directors.

# Jaspersoft released Jaspersoft Studio, an open source BI design environment for Eclipse.

# Joyent and Cloud9 announced an agreement to provide web application developers with a cloud development and deployment platform for Node.js applications from within the Cloud9 IDE.

# With Stackato, ActiveState has extended Cloud Foundry to support Python and Perl.

# WANdisco launched professional uberSVN support.

# Heroku announced that Yukihiro Matsumoto, creator of theRuby programming language, will join Heroku as Chief Architect of Ruby.

# Tarus Balog discussed the importance of trademarks for an open source business.

# Microsoft was apparently the fifth-largest corporate contributor to the Linux kernel version 3.0.0, as measured by the number of changes to its previous release.

# Samba reportedly may consider accepting corporate-donated code.

# basysKom, Codero, Gluster and Nixu Open joined The Linux Foundation.

# Virtual Bridges joined the Open Virtualization Alliance.

The rise, fall and reality of commercial open source

We’ve been writing ourselves about the move toward more permissive licensing in commercial open source, as well as a lessening of the use of ‘open source’ as an identifier or differentiator. We’ve also seen others comment on a perceived loss of significance and importance of free and open source software and open standards. Combine this all with some typical observation on the lack of contribution back to open source software projects, and it might appear that open source software is a once-mighty empire in the midst of decline. However, from my perspective it seems despite all of this, open source software has never before been as pervasive, disruptive and innovative as it is right now. While we have yet to reach open nirvana, open source software is playing a pivotal role in the two most significant software markets currently: cloud computing and mobile computing.

Much of the gloom and doom in open source software the last couple of years has centered on the evil that is ‘open core,’ yet I have been among those contending that open core and the mixing of open source and proprietary models is often something that customers want. In addition, rather than just a matter of converting much or all that open source community goodness to cold hard cash, I believe all of these trends and perspectives support the idea that open source software is actually gaining in significance. Whether it is viewed as an effective marketing mechanism may be another thing, but the fact that open source is prevalent in the two hottest categories of IT today: cloud computing and mobile devices.

We’ve written extensively about open source software’s prevelance in cloud computing. We’ve also covered how the many, critical open source pieces of cloud computing stacks, whether SaaS, IaaS or PaaS, are also having an impact on openness and discussions of it, something we also see when considering recent partnerships and a changing landscape for Linux and open source software.

We’ve also covered the significance and prevalence of open source software in mobile computing. At the same time, we recognized that while open source software was a key ingredient to most if not all mobile software platforms and application ecosystems, there was a lack of open source software reaching end products and users.

In both cases, there are reasons and incentives for ‘going closed,’ so to speak, but it is the true open source efforts that elicit true community benefits: collaboration, transparency, speed, flexibility, security and more. So while open source as a term or identifier may not be what matters most to vendors or customers, there is no question open source is key to the business and future of many, if not most vendors in cloud and mobile computing. Ask Puppet Labs or Chef sponsor Opscode whether open source matters to their customers and their business. Ask Google whether openness is something they consider as they move forward on Android and Chrome. Ask Rackspace whether open source is critical in its open source cloud computing stack, OpenStack. Ask HP whether it is meaningful that WebOS is open source. I have. It is. So the next time we hear about the surrender, retreat, fade or decline of open source software or its importance in today’s computing landscape, just remember that today’s key markets tell a different story.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.24

Red Hat posts Q1 results. USPTO disrupts Oracle’s patent claims.

# Red Hat announced first quarter revenue up 27% to $265m.

# The USPTO rejected 17 of 21 claims related to a patent Oracle is asserting against Google.

# Apple hit Amahi with a cease and desist letter related to its app store.

# The Eclipse Foundation announced the availability of Indigo, its 2011 annual release train.

# Red Hat released Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.0

# Microsoft is working with Joyent and the Node community to bring Node.js to Windows.

# Talend announced the availability of Talend ESB Studio Standard Edition and Talend ESB Enterprise Edition for Data Services and joined the JCP.

# Alfresco announced Alfresco Team for content collaboration.

# Savio Rodrigues discussed the growth or MongoDB into the enterprise.

# Pentaho released Pentaho BI 4 Enterprise Edition.

# Cloudera announced the general availability of its Cloudera Connector for IBM Netezza appliances.

# The Open Virtualization Alliance added 65 new members.

# Acunu released version one of the Acunu Data Platform.

# WSO2 added WSO2 Message Broker and WSO2 Complex Event Processing Server to its updated Carbon middleware platform.

# Nuxeo updated its Studio hosted customization and configuration environment.

# VoltDB announced the release of VoltDB Integration for Hadoop.

# Carlo Daffara discussed the economic value of open source software.

# Nokia and Accenture finalized the agreement for Nokia to outsource Symbian software development and support activities to Accenture.

# Dirk Riehle explained the open source big bang.

# Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols discussed five reasons Android can fail.

# Debian adopted LibreOffice.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.21

Oracle wants billions from Goole. Nokia’s first (and last?) MeeGo phone. And more.

# Oracle is seeking between $1.4bn and $6.1bn in its patent lawsuit against Google.

# Nokia maintained that Qt is an important component of its plan to attract the next billion users.

# As Nokia unveiled its first MeeGo phone, Brian Proffitt pondered whether it might also be the company’s last MeeGo phone.

# Acquia introduced Commons 2.0, its open social business software.

# Dirk Riehle discussed the difference between vendor- and community-led open source projects with regards to licensing and commoditization.

# The FSFE highlighted a dispute over the use of Linux in embedded devices.

# FuseSource unveiled a family of packaged consulting services designed help users of Apache ServiceMix, Camel, ActiveMQ and CXF.

# Penguin Computing announced the availability of PODtool, an interface designed to offload excess workload to Penguin Computing on Demand.

# PrismTech adopted the LGPL license for both the Community and Commercial Editions of its OpenSplice DDS software.

# LexisNexis joined the Linux Foundation.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.17

TDF reveals its advisory board. ActiveState acquires Phenona. And more.

# The Document Foundation revealed the members of its advisory board: Google, SUSE, Red Hat, Freies Office Deutschland, Software in the Public Interest, and the Free Software Foundation.

# ActiveState acquired Phenona, a Perl PaaS provider.

# LexisNexis Risk Solutions released its HPCC Systems competitor ti Hadoop under an open source license.

# Oracle is seeking significant damages in its Android-related dispute with Google, while Google disputed Oracle’s claims about the fragmentation of Java.

# Couchbase announced performance enhancements for Apache CouchDB, included in the the developer preview of Couchbase Single Server 2.0.

# Appcelerator released Titanium Studio for building, testing, and deploying cross-platform applications, based on development technology acquired from Aptana.

# The Apache Software Foundation announced Apache Traffic Server v3.0.0.

# Google announced the availability of its Chromebooks from Acer and Samsung.

# Nuxeo has launched a new version of its Case Management Framework, an enhanced distribution of Nuxeo Enterprise Platform.

# SpagoBI released version 3.0 of its open source business intelligence suite.

# Funambol announced the general availability of MediaHub, a cloud-based digital locker.

# Stephen O’Grady analysed the results of The Eclipse Foundation’s developer survey.

# Adobe transfered its development focus for AIR for Linux from the desktop to mobile.

# Law.com reported that open source could change the future of e-discovery.

# David Eaves explained how GitHub saved open source.

# Brian Proffitt argued that fork history does not favor OpenOffice.org.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.06

Red Hat makes an OpenShift to PaaS. Oracle proposes to Eclipse Hudson. And more.

# Red Hat introduced OpenShift, a Platform-as-a-Service for developers, and launched CloudForms, a product for creating and managing Infrastructure-as-a-Service private and hybrid clouds.

# Red Hat also announced the launch of JBoss Enterprise Data Grid 6, expanded its relationship with Amazon, and announced that it is working together with IBM on KVM-based virtualization projects.

# Oracle announced its proposal to make Hudson a project of the Eclipse Foundation. Jenkins developers are unimpressed. The Eclipse Foundation’s Ian Skerrett rounded up some reaction and answered questions related to the announcement.

# The Apache Software Foundation was subpoenaed to produce documents related to Oracle vs Google. Meanwhile, Oracle’s claims against Google were reduced by the Judge from 132 to 3.

# Attachmate began laying off Novell employees, including Mono developers.

# Actuate’s BIRT licenses represented over half of Actuate license revenue in the first quarter.

# Liferay increased its revenue by 100% in the first quarter.

# Rapid7 increased its sales revenue by 73% in the first quarter.

# CloudBees added Sonar to its DEV@cloud service.

# Gluster announced the general availability of GlusterFS 3.2, as well as the availability of the Gluster Storage Software Appliance.

# Platform Computing launched RTM 8, based on Cacti.

# Arista expanded its EOS Linux-based network operating system.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.03

Novell sold to Attachmate. Barnes & Noble throws the book at Microsoft. And more.

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“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Novell closed its acquisition by Attachmate and its patent sale to CPTN.

# Attachmate’s CEO discussed the company’s plans for SUSE Linux.

# Barnes & Noble accused Microsoft of misusing its patents to undermine Android.

# Acquia increased its revenue 300% in the first quarter compared to last year.

# Actuate announced Q1 BIRT-related license revenue of $6.1m, total revenue $32.1m.

# Google lost a Linux-related patent suit.

# Yahoo is reportedly considering spinning off its Hadoop-related interests in a new company.

# OpenStack launched Project Red Dwarf, its database-as-a-service incubator project.

# CloudBees announced RUN@cloud Private Edition for OpenStack and vSphere.

# Nokia announced that it is outsourcing its Symbian software-related activities, including 3,000 employees, to Accenture. Meanwhile, it appears that Nokia is one of the most active Android contributors.

# Puppet Labs announced its Faces API and relicensed Puppet to Apache 2.0.

# OpenGamma announced the first public release of its technology stack.

# German Insurance company LVM Versicherung is converting 10,000 corporate desktops to Ubuntu.

# Sandro Groganz discussed the distribution model for open source-related software vendors.

# Google launched a WebM video patent cross-licensing initiative.

# Liferay is offering a special bundled version of Liferay Portal Enterprise Edition preinstalled with MuleSoft Tcat Server.