The OpenStack Tipping Point – new report

Since its start in the summer of 2010, the OpenStack open source cloud computing project has been the subject of a lot of hype. Today, the technology, backers and use of OpenStack are giving substance to all of that sizzle and skepticism is giving way to service provider and enterprise use cases across the globe. OpenStack is still relatively immature and still requires a high degree of technical aptitude to deploy, but its community continues to grow in both providers and users, both of which are focused on making the software easier to deploy, manage and scale.

*Coming of age
The OpenStack project itself is not even three years old, but thanks to maturing technology, growing membership and the OpenStack Foundation formed last year, OpenStack has matured to the point it is getting attention from large service provider and enterprise users, including companies in telecommunications, retail and research. Large supporters of OpenStack such as Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM and Rackspace are using OpenStack internally and also in new cloud offerings. We also see vitality in the number of startups and smaller players bringing OpenStack to the market, including Cloudscaling, eNovance, Mirantis, Morphlabs, Nebula and Piston Cloud Computing. We’ve also seen large vendors make acquisitions of key OpenStack players, such as Red Hat’s acquisition of scale-out storage specialist Gluster for $136m in October 2011, VMware’s acquisition of open source networking player Nicira for $1.26 billion in July 2012 and Oracle’s acquisition of cloud management vendor Nimbula in March 2013. We have no doubt as the OpenStack technology and market matures, it will present additional acquirers and targets along the way.

The fact that there were already open source cloud computing options in the market when OpenStack was established helped contribute to a discussion of open source software, open standards and open clouds. We expect OpenStack and other open source cloud options, such as CloudStack, Eucalyptus, Joyent and OpenNebula, will continue to co-exist in the market and will all benefit from the increased credibility they all bring to open source cloud computing. Just as different Linux distributions and different open source hypervisors have helped drive one another in the industry, we are likely to see open clouds do the same thing.

*Components mature, emerge
In addition to its foundation and growing support among vendors and implementors, OpenStack is also gaining traction because the technology of the open source project is maturing and advancing. The main OpenStack components for compute (Nova), networking (Quantum) and storage (Swift) are becoming more credible for enterprises and service providers beyond bleeding edge users. Where there are some of the biggest gaps in OpenStack, such as dashboard/UI, identity services, orchestration or metering, additional components and sub-projects are emerging. While OpenStack continues to require a good degree of technical aptitude to deploy, the OpenStack community seems to be scatching the right itches for broader enterprise and service provider use.

OpenStack users have also indicated that although the OpenStack technology may be lacking in certain features and functionality, they appreciate the ability to be part of the community that solves issues and having more control of their own IT destiny.

*OpenStack Drivers
OpenStack is being driven largely by the growing number of enterprise and service provider organizations that want to put more of their operations and offerings in the cloud. Many companies are seeking the scalability and elasticity of public clouds, but desire more control and want private clouds, where OpenStack is finding some traction. this is particularly true for continuous integration and continuous deployment or devops implementations that combine application development and IT operations for greater efficiency and speed. We are seeing two types of adoption of devops: more proactive efforts that center on speed and iteration and more reactive effors that focus on providing IT resources to developers, productivity and business units so they do not go outside the organization for public cloud, free or low-cost options, also known as ‘shadow IT.’

Other OpenStack drivers parallel the advantages we’ve seen for open source software: cost savings, flexibility and avoiding vendor lock-in. OpenStack users have also indicated it has been helpful to be able to access OpenStack source code and customize it for integration with existing infrastructure and systems. We’ve also heard from some OpenStack implementors that their developers and engineers prefer open source tools and frameworks that give more flexibility.

*OpenStack Hurdles
Despite the size and number of OpenStack supporters and vendors, the open source cloud computing software still represents a technical challenge for many organizations. Baseline features and functionality, such as metering and billing, are just now taking shape in OpenStack and while issues are being rapidly addressed, the software is not ready out of the box by an means.

Another challenge with the project and its use among more enterprises and service providers is the fact that OpenStack talent is in short supply. This is one of the biggest challenges of deploying OpenStack and while users may seek third-party help, their options are somewhat limited. This facet of OpenStack is quickly changing with more training and certification efforts in the works as well as a new OpenStack Operations Guide that was published last month.

We at 451 Research have also fielded more inquiries and questions on OpenStack. In response, we’ve published an extensive report on OpenStack available to 451 Research subscribers here.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.12.16

Topics for this podcast:

*Hadoop roundup
-Cloudera Enterprise Hadoop update
-Hadapt combines Hadoop with db analytics
-Informatica grows its Hadoop work
*HP open sources WebOS
*The GPL fade
*Red Hat acquisition targets

iTunes or direct download (31:41, 5.4MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.14

Jive goes public. webOS goes open source. Cloud Foundry goes .NET. And more.

# Jive Software started IPO at $12 a share, closing the day up nearly 30%.

# HP announced that it plans to release webOS under an open source license. Details are thin on the ground, although Fedora is reportedly an inspiration. Joel West’s post pretty much summed up my thoughts.

# Tier 3 announced that it has created Iron Foundry, and open source .NET Framework implementation of Cloud Foundry.

# Xeround raised $9m funding for its MySQL-as-a-service cloud database.

# Microsoft released the Windows Azure SDK for Node.js as open source and made available a preview of the Apache Hadoop on Windows Azure, amongst a slew of other open source-related announcements.

# Red Hat, Canonical, Cisco, IBM, Intel, NetApp, and SUSE created the oVirt project, based around Red Hat’s Enterprise Virtualization technology for managing KVM environments.

# Nuxeo announced the availability of Nuxeo Platform 5.5.

# Joyent launched its SmartMachine Appliance for MongoDB.

Red Hat announced JBoss Enterprise Portal Platform 5.2 and JBoss Operations Network 3.0.

# Novell announced the availability of Novell Open Enterprise Server 11.

# Couchbase claimed thousands of open source deployments and 150 commercial deployments, but has rethought its product line-up for 2012, having “confused the heck” out of potential users in 2011.

# Univention released Univention Corporate Server 3.0.

# SuccessBricks announced that its ClearDB distributed MySQL-based database service is now available through Heroku.

# Ember.js is the new name for the SproutCore 2.0 JavaScript framework.

# HEnrik Ingo examined the recent spate of MySQL authentication plug-ins.

WebOS and the open alternative live another day

There has been no shortage of reaction to HP’s move to make the Linux-based WebOS open source software. Below, I offer some of my thoughts on the meaning for the different players affected.

*What’s it mean for WebOS?
Moving WebOS to open source was best option for HP. It retains some value in the software depending on its involvement. It is also the best fate for the code, rather then being sold or simmered to its IP and patent value or even used as another weapon in the ongoing mobile software patent wars. Still, the move comes amid huge developer and consumer uncertainty for WebOS. Nevertheless, at least WebOS was already in the market with a compelling products, the Palm the Pre, in the modern smartphone market. WebOS will hopefully have a faster path to open source than Symbian since the former is based on Linux. I still think the greatest opportunity for WebOS may be in serving as an open alternative in the market, particularly after Android has proven to handset makers, wireless carriers, OEMs and others that a Linux-based, open source mobile OS can succeed in the market and provide profit for multiple parties. Furthering this opportunity, WebOS may be even more attractive to these key vendors, channel players and other stakeholders who are tired of the IP and patent stress and expense around Android. Of course, Android was not under patent or IP attack until it was successful in the market and the same may be the case for WebOS, though we think its IP roots and history in touch and smartphone technology are less complex in terms of origin and ownership.

*What’s it mean for competitors?
For Apple, an open source WebOS means more market pressure and open pressure, more competition for developers and a real danger WebOS hooks into the Android ecosystem. WebOS may also be harder to attack from a patent and IP standpoint since it is older and more singular in ownership (Palm and now HP). Other factors include HP’s own formidable patent portfolio and the perception of Apple as a patent aggressor, which would be reinforced if it attacked WebOS the way it has gone after Android.

For Android, it may finally get a dose of its own open medicine, feeling the pressure of another Linux-based, open source mobile OS that is familiar to many developers, compatible with newer smartphone technologies and appealing to handset makers and other key OEMs. However, WebOS is also a validation of Android, which paved the path for mobile Linux and open source to finally break through beyond geeks to reach a mass consumer audience.

As for other proprietary players such as Microsoft and RIM, another open source rival is bad news. It presents another open source option and potentially serious competition on developers, applications, devices, carriers and consumers. An open source WebOS may also make Android, in effect, more open with faster, easier access to code for both Android and WebOS compete. This could make it even harder for these older, proprietary players to get developer or consumer mind share that is already slipping.

*What’s it mean for open source? Really, there is no downside for open source except that it will be viewed as a form of software cemetery if WebOS is not developed or delivered to market. HP’s WebOS move does give open source greater prominence in mobile software. Again, it is a validation of Android, which is Linux-based and open source, and shows that we haven’t seen the last of mobile Linux and open source software in Android.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.07

OpenStack Foundation. New Pentaho CEO. And more.

# Rackspace announced its intention to form an independent OpenStack Foundation.

# HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system for its Public Cloud.

# Pentaho appointed Quentin Gallivan as its new CEO.

# Hortonworks continued the discussion about contributions to Apache Hadoop.

# Bob Bickel explained why CloudBees is not, itself, open source.

# Google announced the limited preview release of Google Cloud SQL.

# Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges joined the Linux Foundation.

# Dave Neary discussed the different types of community in relation to the Tizen project.

# Akamai joined the OpenStack community.

# Daniel Abadi provided his perspective on Oracle’s NoSQL Database.

# One more thing…
Apple’s relationship with open source may be somewhat tenuous – Paul Rooney provides some background – but given the impact Steve Jobs has made on the industry as a whole it seems wrong not to mark his passing in some way. We’ll leave the words to the company he created.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.29

Open Cloud Initiative launches. HP joins OpenStack. Oracle releases Java 7. And more.

# The Open Cloud Initiative launched to drive open standards in cloud computing.

# HP announced its support for OpenStack.

# Oracle announced the availability of Java SE 7. The Apache Software Foundation warned of index corruption and crashes in Apache Lucene and Solr.

# Nebula launched with plans for a turnkey OpenStack hardware appliance.

# Concurrent raised $900K in seed funding for Hadoop-based workflow engine.

# Couchbase and SQLite teamed up to create UnQL (Unstructured Query Language), a new data query language for unstructured data.

# Couchbase released a developer preview of Couchbase Server 2.0, combining CouchDB and Membase.

# OpenLogic published its scorecard to assess how well a particular Platform-as-a-Service offering meets the standard of ‘open’.

# Brian Proffitt asked can a commercial vendor lead a project as openly as a foundation?

# Gluster announced the Gluster Connector for OpenStack.

# Google released its LevelDB key value storage engine using the BSD license.

# SkySQL introduced SkySQL Recovery Manager, a MySQL backup and recovery offering powered by Zmanda.

# Metasploit announced the launch of Metasploit Pro 4.0.

# WANdisco partnered with CloudBees to offer Jenkins with WANdisco’s uberSVN application lifecycle management platform for Apache Subversion.

# Brian Proffitt reported on how innovation is the new draw of open source.

The open card in the mobile game

I wrote last year about the way Google’s Android mobile operating system was serving as a more open alternative to Apple’s iOS, but not so open that it didn’t leave opportunity for an even more open alternative.

Given that we continue to see software patent-based attacks on Android, as well as swirling FUD around coverage of the attacks and never ending suits and settlements and courtroom developments, it is clear it will be a long time before any of this legal business is ever close to settled, unless ended by settlements first, which is likely.

However, I’m more interested in the technology in the meantime. I also think it’s interesting to see, if not a ‘more open’ alternative emerging, at least another, ‘somewhat open’ option in the tablet market, this being HP’s WebOS. It’s interesting that WebOS evolved from Palm, which HP acquired in March 2010 for $1.4 billion. Though Apple’s iPad is still the clear leader in tablets, it is interesting to see continuing signs that what happened in smartphones (where iPhone led and Android quickly caught up and then passed iOS) may be happening in tablets. There is also still the possibility that tablets may play out like netbooks, with wild popularity followed by a fade in favor of more traditional PCs for traditional PC needs. It is interesting to note that Google’s Eric Schmidt recently commented on the continued utility of PCs, which will remain key to professionals, consumers, and also developers, largely because of the tactical keyboard. What is most likely is continued convergence, and it will be interesting to see what ties emerge between WebOS and PCs as computer hardware giant HP rolls out the OS in tablets and smartphones.

We also see other signs that new, open entrants may be mixing things up in the mobile and converged device market, such as word of a possible Android and iOS competitor from Mozilla. There is yet another project that is already a factor in netbooks, other mobile devices and the burgeoning IT market of automobile information and entertainment systems, MeeGo, which is also open source. Even Research in Motion’s Playbook is based on the QNX operating system, for which source code was made available by its previous owner to make it more like the open source Linux OS, which was attracting developers and interesting customers.

We believed there was a fairly prominent place for open source software, open source operating systems and general openness in mobile software when we wrote our report, Mobility Matters three years ago, but we would have never guessed that the openness of this software would be so significant in two respects: defense from patent and other intellectual property attacks; the market power of open source, which draws in not only developers, but manufacturers and other third-parties. We’ve seen the speed and strength at which a project and community such as Android can grow. Will we now begin to see other alternatives that are even more open emerge as top choices among developers, hardware companies, wireless players and consumers? Never before have those alternatives really existed in the mobile software world, so it’s good at least to see the possibility is there.

The rise, fall and reality of commercial open source

We’ve been writing ourselves about the move toward more permissive licensing in commercial open source, as well as a lessening of the use of ‘open source’ as an identifier or differentiator. We’ve also seen others comment on a perceived loss of significance and importance of free and open source software and open standards. Combine this all with some typical observation on the lack of contribution back to open source software projects, and it might appear that open source software is a once-mighty empire in the midst of decline. However, from my perspective it seems despite all of this, open source software has never before been as pervasive, disruptive and innovative as it is right now. While we have yet to reach open nirvana, open source software is playing a pivotal role in the two most significant software markets currently: cloud computing and mobile computing.

Much of the gloom and doom in open source software the last couple of years has centered on the evil that is ‘open core,’ yet I have been among those contending that open core and the mixing of open source and proprietary models is often something that customers want. In addition, rather than just a matter of converting much or all that open source community goodness to cold hard cash, I believe all of these trends and perspectives support the idea that open source software is actually gaining in significance. Whether it is viewed as an effective marketing mechanism may be another thing, but the fact that open source is prevalent in the two hottest categories of IT today: cloud computing and mobile devices.

We’ve written extensively about open source software’s prevelance in cloud computing. We’ve also covered how the many, critical open source pieces of cloud computing stacks, whether SaaS, IaaS or PaaS, are also having an impact on openness and discussions of it, something we also see when considering recent partnerships and a changing landscape for Linux and open source software.

We’ve also covered the significance and prevalence of open source software in mobile computing. At the same time, we recognized that while open source software was a key ingredient to most if not all mobile software platforms and application ecosystems, there was a lack of open source software reaching end products and users.

In both cases, there are reasons and incentives for ‘going closed,’ so to speak, but it is the true open source efforts that elicit true community benefits: collaboration, transparency, speed, flexibility, security and more. So while open source as a term or identifier may not be what matters most to vendors or customers, there is no question open source is key to the business and future of many, if not most vendors in cloud and mobile computing. Ask Puppet Labs or Chef sponsor Opscode whether open source matters to their customers and their business. Ask Google whether openness is something they consider as they move forward on Android and Chrome. Ask Rackspace whether open source is critical in its open source cloud computing stack, OpenStack. Ask HP whether it is meaningful that WebOS is open source. I have. It is. So the next time we hear about the surrender, retreat, fade or decline of open source software or its importance in today’s computing landscape, just remember that today’s key markets tell a different story.

Hypervisor fight good for customers, good for FOSS

There have been many changes in the market and technology since Citrix acquired XenSource and a major stewardship stake in the Xen open source hypervisor four years ago. Red Hat’s 2008 Qumranet acquisition and subsequent push behind the Linux-integrated Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) hypervisor has added to the disruption. One thing, though, remains the same: the intense competition among these open source hypervisors in the enterprise market.

Read the entire article at LinuxInsider.

Community Linux love from Microsoft

One of big stories out of the Open Source Business Conference this week was Microsoft’s announced support for the CentOS community Linux distribution, a free clone of RHEL that nonetheless enjoys significant enterprise and cloud computing use, as we’ve covered extensively, including a special report that is currently being updated, in part, with a new survey.

This is not the first time MS has displayed love for unpaid, community Linux, given its 2009 contribution of GPL-licensed code to the Linux kernel. This was significant in that it was contribution and participation by Microsoft in the Linux kernel, beyond one of its partner’s Linux distributions, such as the case of Novell and SUSE Linux and more recently, Red Hat and its RHEL for mutual, customer-demanded virtualization support (451 subscribers) between Microsoft and Red Hat.

It seems Microsoft understands that unlike pirated Windows, which it considers a loss, the use of free, unpaid Linux — particularly by large enterprise, government and other organizations — is a big opportunity for it.

True, use of community Linux is typically driven by cost savings and the capability of sizable organizations to self-manage their Linux servers, often involving no payment. However, our research indicates there is often is still a need for higher level support and, more commonly, the ‘insurance factor’ of having a commercial vendor behind your infrastructure software so you, or your boss or board, have someone to call or blame if things go wrong. Microsoft is capable of supporting CentOS in both cases of technical support and being the insurance for an organization. It will be interesting to see the kind of reaction and traction the company gets from customers, presumably Windows shops, running CentOS.

It was only a couple of years ago we were writing about the death, and ongoing life of CentOS.

Today, it continues to be one of the most fascinating open source software projects in that it has no formal commercial backer, not even a foundation, but yet benefits from a solid, dedicated development team that continues to push the OS forward. We, along with Microsoft, continue to hear about use of CentOS increasingly in cloud computing, where it can be used, often free of charge, to add, subtract, scale and scrap as needed. It is, like other Linux distributions, also popular among hosting and other service providers, who again are primarily building public, private and hybrid cloud environments and ecosystems.

This is why again it is very interesting to see Microsoft supporting CentOS with HyperV and Windows. It’s not the first vendor to do so, as server giant HP has supported CentOS, Debian and other community distros to some extent in its server and support offerings. Microsoft’s CentOS support is certainly another example of how the landscape and market for various Linux distributions and operating systems in general is currently undergoing disruption.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.05.13

Topics for this podcast:

*Watching for possible devops deals
*New technology, offerings highlight Hadoop
*Oracle proposes Hudson as Eclipse project
*Red Hat’s latest IaaS and PaaS
*Defining open source
*Big changes in the Linux and open source landscape
*451 Group at OSBC 2011 in San Francisco

iTunes or direct download (36:17, 6.2MB)

Is Android FUD a forebearer of Linux-like success?

Time is flying by so fast, it sure doesn’t seem like it was last year I was blogging about how Android is for real. Well, let me reiterate … Android is for real. The reason I say that and stress that is despite its success, we see a variety of legal threats, accusations and actual lawsuits flying at Android as fast as it is growing in the market.

Still, we seem to be able to fairly easily find agreement among vendors, developers and users that Android development is not slowing down, that legal maneuvering will not pave a path to success or that any ruling or action will take Android-based phones out of consumers’ hands. This is not to say Android doesn’t face significant challenges: real fragmentation and version overload; a software development pace that may be too fast for handset makers or consumers; innovation from rivals such as Apple, HP, Research In Motion, Microsoft and others, including ones we may not yet be considering a threat, but which may find an improvement or refinement. This could be as simple as serving as the more open alternative.

I’ve seen some criticisms of Android and Google indicating it is clear or should be clear what is open source and what is not. I would argue, however, that is has become quite unclear what is open source and what is not in all circumstances and particularly in smartphones, as we covered in our special report Mobility Matters two-and-a-half long years ago. There’s no denying the constant pressure for Android and Google and others in the ecosystem to be true to the spirit and letter of open source and its licenses, however painful, serves to strengthen its open source aspects. However, the statements and signals crying foul against Android are quite similar to the complaints, threats and, yes, FUD we saw swirling around Linux a decade ago. And let’s not forget the lesson of open enough, which becomes even more significant given cloud computing and the capabilities it is extending to smartphones and other mobile devices.

Bottom line, developers, handset manufacturers and consumers are heavily more focused on new releases every six months than who is suing whom in the IP infringement claim game and software patent ‘system.’ To predict where Android is headed and what is likely to happen as a result of the FUD, we can look at Linux, which emerged stronger, more competitive and more enterprise-ready after the infamous SCO threats and lawsuits.

I have no fear that Android development and innovation will slow down as a result of legal claims, suits or threats. I have no uncertainty that new features, functionality, applications and development will be the drivers in the market and I have no doubt that the companies, cash and consumers on the line will keep things incredibly interesting over the next several years. No FUD here. Nothing to see, move on.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.11

Novell-Attachmate deal delayed. Microsoft re-thinks Marketplace license demands. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Novell’s sale to Attachmate has been delayed until at least April 12, due to concerns related to patent sale.

# Microsoft said it will allow EPL and MPL applications on its Marketplace app store.

# Savio Rodrigues discussed open source and app stores – where they mix and where they don’t.

# Clustercorp raised $3m from Anthem Venture Partners and Avalon Ventures.

# Red Hat released JBoss Enterprise SOA Platform 5.1.

# SourceForge quietly released its underlying code under the Apache license.

# Cfengine and C12G Labs partnered on automatic creation and management of virtualized data center and cloud environments.

# HP CEO said every PC shipped by HP starting next year will include WebOS, as well as Windows.

# Ingres launched SkySafe, a new cloud-based managed database service.

# Ubuntu Netbook Edition is being folded into Ubuntu.

# Panasonic joined the Linux Foundation.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.08

NoSQL vendors merge to form Couchbase. Funding for Basho and EnterpriseDB. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# NoSQL vendors CouchOne and Membase merged to form Couchbase, create open source distributed document database.

# EnterpriseDB increased its most recent fundraising round from $7.5m to $13.6m.

# Basho Technologies raised $7.5m in series D funding, as Danish IT company Trifork acquired an 8% stake in the company and became the European distributor for Riak.

# The FSF and the OSI responded to the DOJ’s request for more info on the Novell/CPTN patent deal.

# Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud is now available to the US federal government via Autonomic Resources.

# Gluster announced Gluster Virtual Storage Appliances for VMware and Amazon Web Services.

# Jaspersoft and SugarCRM announced a number of BI features available integrated with SugarCRM Pro or Enterprise.

# Novell is bundling SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability (HA) Extension with select HP systems.

# MuleSoft announced a private beta program for a new integration platform as a service called Mule iON.

# Actuate generated over $21.2m in BIRT-related business in 2010, bringing the total in the last 4 years to over $62.5m.

# Tuxera joined the Linux Foundation.

# Mandriva joined the Open Invention Network as licensee.

# Whamcloud entered into a partnership with Bull to accelerate the development of Lustre.

# VMware released Zimbra 7.

# DotNetNuke claimed to have tripled its customer base since the end of 2009 to over 1,000.

# Eric Baldeschwieler presented the backstory of Yahoo and Hadoop.

# Groklaw reported that UnXis has been selected as the buyer for the software product business of The SCO Group.

# Jason van Zyl maintained that Hudson has a bright future under Oracle, with Sonatype’s support.

Red Hat reaches for clouds with interesting Eucalyptus deal

It was interesting to see a partnership announcement between Red Hat and Eucalyptus Systems, commercial supporter of the Eucalyptus cloud computing framework. Why so interesting? Mainly because there are several, significant competitive, partnership and technology implications from the deal.

First off, we’re been waiting for a more pronounced response from Eucalyptus Systems to OpenStack, the open source cloud computing stack backed initially by Rackspace and NASA and supported by a growing cast of both open source and non-open source players. We’ve also wondered about the competitive implications of OpenStack for Red Hat, which despite previously being sharply focused on the enterprise server market, is now working hard to extend into cloud computing, service providers and Paas, as evidenced also by its recent acquisition of Makara, which was a Eucalyptus Systems partner. Thus, the Red Hat-Eucalyptus partnership may be in part a response to OpenStack on the part of either or both partners.

The pairing is also interesting since Eucalyptus Systems has long worked closely with Ubuntu Linux distributor Canonical, which relies on the open source Eucalyptus software for its Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. While Canonical has not presented much of a threat to Red Hat and its RHEL in the overall enterprise server market, the same cannot be said for cloud computing, where Canonical was first to address cloud computing users and also benefits from the popularity of Ubuntu in both public and private clouds and among developers. So it will be intersting to see whether Eucalyptus Systems’ partnership with Red Hat has any impact on Canonical’s own partnership with Eucalyptus Systems or use of Eucalyptus software.

There are also other significant Eucalyptus Systems partners that come into play, particularly the recently-launched NRE Alliance, a coalition of newScale, rPath and Euaclyptus Systems for self-service private and hybrid clouds, as covered in a 451 Group report. Additional Eucalyptus partners that make its partnership with Red Hat and its progress even more interesting: Convirture, Dell, GroundWork Open Source, HP, Membase, Novell, Puppet Labs, Rightscale, rPath, Terracotta, Vmware and Zmanda.

Finally, it’s interesting yet again to note that we may be seeing some response to the fact that much of the Linux that is used in cloud computing is unpaid, community Linux, such as CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu, which is frequently a leader among Linux distributions, whether public or private clouds. The good news for Red Hat is that we are seeing Fedora among these community editions among Linux in the clouds. The use of unpaid, community Linux by many cloud users — particularly those testing and building privte and hybrid clouds — also highlights the monetization and commercialization challenges faced by Linux vendors here, particularly cloud leader Canonical.

Back to the Red Hat-Eucalyptus deal, we have no question we will continue to see interesting partnerships form among Linux and other open source software vendors and others as they all come together in the clouds.

451 CAOS Links 2010.12.15

Google contributes WindowBuilder to Eclipse. Backdoors in OpenBSD? And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Google contributed WindowBuilder and CodePro Profiler to the Eclipse Foundation.

# Oracle is in another Java legal battle, this time with Myriad Group.

# Are there US Government backdoors in OpenBSD? One alleged FBI plant denies involvement.

# Puppet Labs released MCollective version 1.0 following its acquisition of The Marionette Collective.

# Eucalyptus partnered with Red Hat on Eucalyptus support for RHEV and compatibility with Apache Deltacloud.

# Gazzang last week raised $3.5m for software to secure open source software for use in the cloud.

# Richard Stallman warned against Google’s Chrome OS.

# Lucid Imagination announced the general availability and free download for LucidWorks Enterprise.

# The openSUSE project announced the appointment of Alan Clark as openSUSE board chair.

# Black Duck adding IBM Rational AppScan Source Edition to its code-scanning assessment services.

# The Apache Software Foundation launched the Apache Extras hosting site for complementary projects.

# Karmasphere integrated Apache Hive with the Karmasphere Application Framework to create Karmasphere Analyst.

# WSO2 launched WSO2 Application Server 4.0 with full Apache Tomcat support.

# CloudBees acquired Java PaaS provider Stax Networks.

# Facebook explained how it uses Hadoop and released the code of its internal distribution.

# NEC and Novell created a high availability offering optimized for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

# Dries Buytaert explained how Drupal benefits from VC funding.

# Canonical, GENIVI, HP, LiMo Foundation and MontaVista Software are to become advisers to Linaro.

# Bill Burke welcomed the ASFs departure from the JCP, blames the ASF for Java 7 delay.

# The Linux Foundation appointed OpenEmbedded core developer and Yocto Project maintainer Richard Purdie as a Fellow.

# C12G Labs announced version 2.0 OpenNebulaPro, based on the OpenNebula Toolkit.

Open Compliance Program upgrades open source adoption freeway

The Linux Foundation this week launched the Open Compliance Program, its set of open source software tools and training to further ease open source adoption, including a self-assessment checklist and new data exchange standard for reporting software information, such as license and legal requirements. The program consists of six components: tools such as software dependency checker, bill of materials checker and code janitor that covers code in source code comments such as future product information; self-assessment checklist; SPDX standard with workgroup for standardization of bill of materials and labeling of open source components; compliance directory with alerting system; training and education; and community, which is part of FOSSBazaar.

The offering is somewhat similar to what Black Duck Software, OpenLogic, Palamida, Protecode and HP’s open source FOSSology do, though it is not necessarily as comprehensive and thus not as competitive. The Open Compliance Program is intended to help users of open source — which increasingly are mobile device and software makers, embedded software developers and ISVs and service providers — know their code. We’ve previously discussed how difficult economic conditions can benefit open source software, which is (associated with cost savings) and reduce the ‘risk threshold for using open source,’ and now that more organizations are using open source, there is more demand to understand the ramifications and real risks that go along with the benefits.

A long list of supporters and endorsers of the Open Compliance Program include: Adobe, AMD, ARM, Cisco, Google, HP, IBM, Intel, Motorola, NEC, Novell, Samsung, Sony and the Software Freedom Law Center.

This is not the first effort toward more standardization of the actual adoption of open source software. Previous efforts include the Open Solutions Alliance, which has been fairly quiet since its 2009 merger with the OW2 Consortium. Prior to that, there was the Linux Standard Base, led in large part by Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, who is widely credited for the cross-industry and developing market growth of the foundation’s membership. So while there is always some skepticism and redundancy in such efforts (this one most likely with the existing FOSSBazaar community), the Open Compliance Program appears to be scratching the right itch.

One thing we continue to hear — whether in enterprise software, embedded software, mobile devices, service providers or other markets — is a demand for alternatives amid a lack of standard technology. This highlights the ongoing opportunity for open source software, which has evolved and matured and in many ways come of age, but which still appears to be in the early stages of reaching fall of its potential.

451 CAOS Links 2010.07.30

Adobe to acquire Day Software. Gnome contributors. Oracle bad, Oracle good. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Adobe agreed to acquire Day Software for $240m.

# Dave Neary published Gnome census, including a list of the top company contributors. , which prompted the following…
# Greg DeKoenigsberg – Red Hat, 16%. Canonical, 1%
# Jeffrey Stedfast – Re:Red Hat, 16%. Canonical, 1%
# Jono Bacon: – Red Hat, Canonical and GNOME Contributions
# Carlo Daffara – About contributions, Canonical and adopters.

# Oracle rebrands Java, breaks Eclipse. Oracle demonstrates great community support and fixes Eclipse.

# Dell and HP will certify and resell Oracle Enterprise Linux, Solaris and Oracle VM on their respective x86 platforms.

# Oracle reportedly shut down servers Sun had contributed to the build farm for PostgreSQL.

# Whamcloud is a new venture-backed company formed around the Lustre distributed file system.

# Openbravo reported that new downloads of its open source ERP software have increased 320% in five months.

# Mitchell Baker provided an update on Mozilla’s search fro a new CEO.

# Nuxeo updated Nuxeo Digital Asset Management and released Nuxeo DAM – Cloud Edition.

# CodeWeavers released CrossOver 9.1 and CrossOver Games 9.1 for both Mac and Linux.

# Rapid7 is sponsoring and partnering with w3af, the open source Web application attack and audit framework.

# Brian Proffitt said don’t be too quick to dismiss open core.

# Tarus Balog explained why he thinks open core is dead.

# Nagios Enterprises gained more than 200 Nagios XI customers in the first half of 2010.

# Former Sun distinguished engineer Bryan Cantrill joined Joyent as VP of engineering.

# The Indonesian Ministry for Research and Technology estimated that migration to OSS could save state as much $400m.

# Novell said reports SuSE Linux losing share to Ubuntu are nonsense.

# The GNOME Release Team pushed the GNOME 3.0 release to March 2011.

# Convirture released version 2.0 of the Enterprise edition of its ConVirt virtualization management software.

# Sourcefire launched Razorback, a framework for multi-vendor threat detection and protection.

# Qualys released BlindElephant, an open source web application fingerprinting engine.

# Contegix agreed to sponsor the Clojure development language project.

# vtiger unveiled vtiger CRM On Demand, the cloud-based version of its open source CRM software.

# Jos Poortvliet joined Novell as openSUSE Community Manager.

# Funambol introduced DM Carrier Edition an open source device management offering for WiMAX.

# Sony Pictures Imageworks and Industrial Light & Magic developed Alembic, an open source exchange format.

# The Register reported that Canonical will integrate Hadoop and NoSQL database technologies with Ubuntu 10.10.

# The Open Invention Network experienced 35% growth in licensees during the second quarter.

# OpenSAF released version 4.0 of its high availability middleware platform.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2010.06.11

Topics for this podcast:

*Linaro reinforces traction for mobile and embedded Linux
*Open source strategy spotlights: Novell, HP
*Riptano makes commercial play with Apache Cassandra
*Linux still tops in Top500 Supercomputers

iTunes or direct download (26:27, 7.3MB)

451 CAOS Links 2010.06.11

VMware standardizes on SUSE Linux. SCO loses again. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# VMware is standardizing its virtual appliances on Novell SUSE Linux and will distribute and support SLES in vSphere.

# GigaOm reported that VMware is in talks to acquire Engine Yard.

# Judge rules against The SCO Group. Again. And as Groklaw explained, this time it might finally be the end of it.

# EU Internet commissioner Neelie Kroes warned against government getting locked-in to proprietary software.

# Pentaho released Data Integration Enterprise Edition 4.0 and BI Suite Enterprise Edition 3.6.

# Canonical is reportedly developing a version of Ubuntu for tablets.

# HP acquired Phoenix Technologies’ Linux-based quick-boot OS and client virtualization assets.

# Glyn Moody explored why there are no billion dollar open source companies.

# Cloudera co-founder Christophe Bisciglia is leaving the company.

# Intelestream launched the intelecrm Cloud Edition application on the Amazon EC2.

# Engineering Group launched the GeoBI initiative, a new open source effort focused on location intelligence.

# BonitaSoft claimed 300,000 downloads in its first year.

# Should OSS thank Apple? The H and Jim Zemlin think so. Alan Shimel thinks not.

# Liferay announced the availability of Liferay Social Office Enterprise Edition.

# Bob Sutor published a list of 10 considerations for maintaining open source in your organization.

# Nexenta added OpenSolaris contributor Garrett D’Amore and ZFS expert Richard Elling to is staff.

# Engine Yard announced the release of Rubinius, a new language runtime for Ruby written in Ruby and C++.

# Ingres confirmed that the open source version of VectorWise due for release by the end of the year.

# Ulteo announced that is working with Microsoft on its Windows- and Linux-based virtual desktop software.