451 CAOS Links 2011.12.20

Red Hat revenue hits $290m. New CEOs for Cloudant and Lucid Imagination. And more.

# Red Hat announced Q3 revenue of $290m, up 23%, and net income of $38.2m, compared with $26.0m a year ago.

# Cloudant raised $2.1m in an equity and stock funding and named Derek Schoettle as its new chief executive officer.

# The Apache Software Foundation published an open letter explaining the progress of Apache OpenOffice (Incubating) and reinforcing its position on trademarks and fundraising.

# Lucid Imagination named Paul Doscher CEO.

# The founder of the ownCloud project, Frank Karlitschek, formed a commercial entity, ownCloud Inc, with former SUSE/Novell executive Markus Rex.

# Adobe published the proposal for Flex to become an Apache Incubator project.

# Actuate launched BIRT Performance Analytics.

# Uhuru Software introduced Uhuru .NET Services for Cloud Foundry.

# Palantir released its first open source code with the launch of two projects: Cinch and Sysmon.

# Quest Software introduced Quest One Privilege Manager for Sudo.

# CollabNet announced that Git is now available as a hosted offering on its Codesion cloud development platform.

# The Outercurve Foundation published the results of a survey of software developers about their open source coding habits.

# Basho Technologies introduced an early version of Riaknostic, a diagnostic system for Riak.

The future of commercial open source business strategies

The reason we are confident that the comparative decline in the use of the GNU GPL family of licenses and the increasing significance of complementary vendors in relation to funding for open source software-related vendors will continue is due to the analysis of our database of more than 400 open source software-related vendors, past and present.

We previously used the database to analyze the engagement of vendors with open source projects for our Control and Community report, plotting the strategies used by the vendors against the year in which they first began to engage with open source projects to get an approximate view of open source-related strategy changes over time.

For example, we found that the engagement of vendors with projects that used strong copyleft licenses peaked in 2006, while the engagement of vendors with projects using non-copyleft licenses had been rising steadily since 2002.

Analysis of our updated database shows that the the number of new vendors engaging with open source projects in each year has risen steadily in recent years, from 26 in 2008 to 44 in 2011. However, as noted last week, we have also seen a shift towards ‘complementary vendors’ – those that are dependent on open source software to build their products and services, even though those products and services may not themselves be open source.

2010 was the first year in which we saw more complementary vendors engage with open source projects than open source specialist, and that trend accelerated in 2011.

As previously explained, complementary vendors were responsible for over 30% of open source software-related funding raised in 2011, and we should expect that proportion to remain high given that over 57% of the vendors engaging with open source in 2011 were complementary vendors.

We have also seen that complementary vendors are more likely to engage with projects with non-copyleft licenses (38% of complementary vendors have engaged with projects with non-copyleft licenses, compared to 24% that have engaged with projects with strong copyleft licenses).

If we look at all 400+ vendors in our database in terms of open source software license preference, the trend towards new vendors engaging with non-copyleft licenses is clear.

There has been a strong shift from vendors towards non-copyleft licenses in recent years, accelerated in 2011 by the likes of Apache Hadoop and OpenStack in particular. This does not mean that the number of projects using strong copyleft licensing has decreased (although as we previously saw the proportion of projects using the GPL family of licenses has declined).

It is indicative, we believe, of the shift away from specialist open source vendors using vendor-led projects and strong copyleft licenses towards multi-vendor collaborative projects and proprietary implementations of open source code, however.

This trend should not really surprise anyone. For some time we have seen open source becoming part of the fabric of modern software development and licensing strategies, rather than a competitive differentiator. Back in 2009 we predicted the increased importance of business strategies that relied on vendor-led development communities, rather than projects dominated by a single vendor.

We called this “open source 4.0” and later suggested that it might be considered the golden age of open source, based on our belief that vendors had learned that they stand to gain more from collaborating on open source projects and differentiating at another stage in the software stack than they do from attempting to control open source projects.

Updating the results of our analysis to the end of 2011 and 400+ vendors indicates that, from the perspective of the commercial adoption of open source business strategies at least, we were not far off.

Some might not consider the proliferation of multi-vendor open source communities and proprietary distributions of open source software as the peak of achievement for open source. Each is of course entitled to come to their own conclusions about the implications.

Our perspective, as always, is that open source methodologies present a potentially disruptive, and also valuable, asset that complements the way both vendors and enterprise IT organizations conduct their businesses.

Our analysis indicates, however, that open source methodologies are increasingly being employed by ‘complementary vendors’ with a leaning towards more permissive licensing.

Our Total Data report is now totally available

…and it’s totally awesome. For more details of our Total Data report, and how to get it, see our Too Much Information blog.

VC funding for OSS hits new high. Or does it?

One of the favourite blog topics on CAOS Theory blog over the years has been our quarterly and annual updates on venture capital funding for open source-related businesses, based on our database of over 600 funding deals since January 1997 involving nearly 250 companies, and over $4.8bn.

There are still a few days left for funding deals to be announced in 2011 but it is already clear that 2011 will be a record year. $672.8m has been invested in open source-related vendors in 2011, according to our preliminary figures, an increase of over 48% on 2010, and the highest total amount invested in any year, beating the previous best of $623.6m, raised in 2006.

Following the largest single quarter for funding for open source-related vendors ever in Q3, Q4 was the second largest single quarter for funding for open source-related vendors ever, as $230.4m was invested in companies including Cloudera, Hortonworks, and Rapid7.

As with Q3, however, the list of vendors presents us with something of an existential dilemma, as we see an increasing amount of activity by what we have referred to as ‘complementary vendors’ – those that are dependent on open source software to build their products and services, even though those products and services may not themselves be open source – as opposed to open source specialists.

The list of complementary vendors has grown rapidly in 2011, particularly around projects such as OpenStack and Apache Hadoop. If we examine the figures in more detail we find that over 30% of the funding raised in 2011 was raised by complementary vendors, compared to just 4% in 2006.

In fact, as the chart below indicates, VC funding for specialist open source vendors in 2011 was actually less than that in 2006 and 2008, and only marginally up on 2010, when again just 4% of funding went to complementary vendors.

The low amount of funding for complementary vendors in 2010 shows that the significance of complementary vendors is not growing at a constant rate, although for reasons that will become clear when we publish a follow-up post on the latest trends regarding the engagement of vendors with open source projects, we do expect that the proportion of funding related to complementary vendors is more likely to increase in the future, rather than decline.

This has implications for the ongoing trends related to open source software licensing, as covered yesterday. Examining our database of over 400 open source-related vendors – funded and unfunded, complementary and specialist – indicates that specialist vendors are much more likely to engage with projects using strong copyleft licenses than complementary vendors.

Specifically, our data indicates that 55% of open source specialists have engaged with projects that use strong copyleft licenses, while just 20% have engaged with projects with non-copyleft licenses. In comparison, 38% of complementary vendors have engaged with projects with non-copyleft licenses, compared to 24% that have engaged with projects with strong copyleft licenses.

Will will take a more detailed look at the trends related to the engagement of vendors with open source projects in the concluding part of this series of posts.

On the continuing decline of the GPL

Our most popular CAOS blog post of the year, by some margin, was this one, from early June, looking at the trend towards persmissive licensing, and the decline in the usage of the GNU GPL family of licenses.

Prompted by this post by Bruce Byfield, I thought it might be interesting to bring that post up to date with a look at the latest figures.

NB: I am relying on the current set of figures published by Black Duck Software for this post, combined with our previous posts on the topic. I am aware that some people are distrustful of Black Duck’s figures given the lack of transparency on the methodology for collecting them. Since I previously went to a lot of effort to analyze data collected and published by FLOSSmole to find that it confirmed the trend suggested by Black Duck’s figures, I am confident that the trends are an accurate reflection of the situation.

The figures indicate that not only has the usage of the GNU GPL family of licenses (GPL2+3, LGPL2+3, AGPL) continued to decline since June, but that the decline has accelerated. The GPL family now accounts for about 57% of all open source software, compared to 61% in June.

As you can see from the chart below, if the current rate of decline continues, we project that the GPL family of licenses will account for only 50% of all open source software by September 2012.

That is still a significant proportion of course, but would be down from 70% in June 2008. Our projection also suggests that permissive licenses (specifically in this case, MIT/Apache/BSD/Ms-PL) will account for close to 30% of all open source software by September 2012, up from 15% in June 2009 (we don’t have a figure for June 2008 unfortunately).

Of course, there is no guarantee that the current rate of decline will continue – as the chart indicates the rate of decline slowed between June 2009 and June 2011, and it may well do so again. Or it could accelerate further.

Interestingly, however, while the more rapid rate of decline prior to June 2009 was clearly driven by the declining use of the GPLv2 in particular, Black Duck’s data suggests that the usage of the GPL family declined at a faster rate between June 2011 and December 2011 (6.7%) than the usage of the GPLv2 specifically (6.2%).

UPDATE – It is has been rightfully noted that this decline relates to the proportion of all open source software, while the number of projects using the GPL family has increased in real terms. Using Black Duck’s figures we can calculate that in fact the number of projects using the GPL family of licenses grew 15% between June 2009 and December 2011, from 105,822 to 121,928. However, in the same time period the total number of open source projects grew 31% in real terms, while the number of projects using permissive licenses grew 117%. – UPDATE

As indicated in June, we believe there are some wider trends that need to be discussed in relation to license usage, particularly with regards to vendor engagement with open source projects and a decline in the number of vendors engaging with strong copyleft licensed software.

The analysis indicated that the previous dominance of strong copyleft licenses was achieved and maintained to a significant degree due to vendor-led open source projects, and that the ongoing shift away from projects controlled by a single vendor toward community projects was in part driving a shift towards more permissive non-copyleft licenses.

We will update this analysis over the next few days with a look at the latest trends regarding the engagement of vendors with open source projects, and venture funding for open source-related vendors, providing some additional context for the trends related to licensing.

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.09

Funding for BlazeMeter and Digital Reasoning. Red Hat goes unstructured. And more.

# BlazeMeter announced $1.2m in Series A funding and launched the a cloud service for load and performance testing.

# Digital Reasoning announced a second round of funding to help develop its Hadoop-based analytics offering.

# Red Hat announced the availability of Red Hat Storage Software Appliance, based on its recent acquisition of Gluster.

# Red Hat also announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2.

# Jaspersoft released Jaspersoft 4.5, delivering drag-and-drop analytics and reporting on Apache Hadoop, NoSQL and analytic databases.

# Jaspersoft also delivered a second-generation native connector to MongoDB.

# CloudBees announced the availability of Jenkins Enterprise by CloudBees providing support and enhanced capabilities for the Jenkins Continuous Integration platform.

# Diaspora* is back in action, and outlined its plans.

# Talend announced that Bi3 Solutions has embedded Talend Integration Suite inside its Software-as-a-Service platform.

# DataStax announced new versions of Apache Cassandra, DataStax Community, and DataStax Enterprise.

# The H reported that Microsoft’s Windows Store agreement has open source exception.

# Black Duck Software announced the release of Export 6.0.

# Antelink launched SourceSquare, a free open source scanning engine.

451 CAOS Links 2011.12.06

Data.gov goes open source. GridGain raises $2.5m And more.

# The White House is set to open source Data.gov as open government data platform.

# GridGain closed $2.5m series A funding.

# Digital Reasoning raised an undisclosed series B funding round.

# Contrary to some reports, Google and Mozilla are still negotiating their search and advertising deal.

# Jedox introduced version 3.3 of its BI suite, changing the name of the premium edition from Palo to Jedox.

# MapR announced version 1.2 of the MapR Distribution for Apache Hadoop.

# Xamarin released Mono for Android 4.0.

# Splunk introduced Shep, an open source project that enables two-way Splunk-Hadoop integration.

# HPCC Systems is now providing its Thor Data Refinery Cluster on the Amazon Web Services platform.

# Monty Program previewed some features in forthcoming versions of MariaDB.

# AppDynamics partnered with Datastax to provide application performance management for distributed applications running on Apache Cassandra.

# Gorilla Logic announced the latest version of FoneMonkey for iOS

451 CAOS Links. 2011.12.02

Talend delivers v5. Zentyal raises series A. The TCO of OSS. And more.

# Talend announced version 5 of its data integration suite, adding business process management capabilities via an OEM relationship with BonitaSoft. Yves De Montcheuil explained the name changes in version 5.

# Zentyal closed a series A venture capital funding of over $1m by Open Ocean Capital.

# The London School of Economics released a report on the total cost of ownership of open source software.

# Couchbase announced the availability of the Couchbase Hadoop Connector, developed in conjunction with Cloudera.

# Rackspace announced the private beta of Rackspace MySQL Cloud Database.

# The debate over the role of open source foundations in the Git era continued, including a follow-up by the instigator, Mikael Rogers, a rallying cry for autonomy from Ceki Gülcü, and Simon Phipps warning about throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

# Marco Abis is stepping down as CEO of Sourcesense.

# NGINX usage has grown almost 300% over the last year, according to Netcraft figures discussed by Royal Pingdom.

# The Wireless Innovation Forum announced the formation of the Open Source Framework for Commercial Baseband Software project.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.29

Software foundations in the Git era. New funding for Puppet Labs. And more

# Mikeal Rogers’ post on the Apache Software Foundation’s slow response to the Git era prompted significant discussion, from Mike Milinkovich, Bradley M. Kuhn, Stephen Walli, Stephen O’Grady, Simon Phipps, and the ASF’s Jim Jagielski. Alternative you could just read this tweet.

# Puppet Labs raised $8.5m in series C funding from Cisco, Google Ventures, and VMware as well as Kleiner Perkins, True Ventures, and Radar Partners.

# YaCy, a free distributed search engine was launched.

# Alex Pinchev, Red Hat’s Executive Vice President of Sales, Services & Field Marketing, will be stepping down in January to become the chief executive officer of a data protection software company.

# Tasktop Technologies announced Tasktop Sync 2.0.

# Interesting statistics on Apache Hadoop adoption based on LinkedIn data, from NC State University’s Institute for Advanced Analytics.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.23

Red Hat’s Ceylon makes its debut. Heroku launches PostgreSQL service. And more.

# Red Hat’s Ceylon programming language made its public debut. Mark Little provided some context.

# Heroku announced the launch of Heroku Postgres as a standalone service.

# GitHub co-founder Tom Preston-Werner explained why you should open source (almost) everything.

# Mikeal Rogers discussed the issues behind the Apache Software Foundation’s slow response to the Git era.

# Royal Pingdom explored recent trends in Linux distribution popularity, pondering the rise of Linux Mint and the decline of Ubuntu.

# Canonical is dropping CouchDB from Ubuntu One.

# ActiveState announced that Stackato Micro Cloud will continue to be free of charge for developers to use as their own private Platform-as-a-Service.

# The European Space Agency wants to publish more of its software using open source licences.

# Sourceforge provided some interesting statistics on operating system usage.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.18

Rapid7 secures new funding. Microsoft drops Dryad. And more.

# Rapid7 secured $50m in series C funding.

# Microsoft confirmed that it is ditching its Dryad project in favour of Apache Hadoop.

# Arun Murthy provided more details of Apache Hadop 0.23.

# The Google Plugin for Eclipse and GWT Designer projects are now fully open source.

# openSUSE released version 12.1.

# Amazon released the source code of the Kindle Fire.

# Black Duck Software joined the GENIVI Alliance.

# dotCloud announced the availability of the top three databases MySQL, MongoDB and Redis on its PaaS.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.15

Funding for Vyatta and Hortonworks. Ice Cream Sandwich source code. And more.

# Vyatta raised $12m in new funding from HighBAR Partners and existing investors JPMorgan, Arrowpath Venture Partners and Citrix Systems.

# Index Ventures announced that it has invested in Hortonworks, reportedly as part of a substantial B round.

# Google released the source code to Ice Cream Sandwich.

# SugarCRM announced billings growth of 69% in Q3

# Apache Hadoop 0.23 has been released.

# Revolution Analytics announced the general availability of Revolution R Enterprise 5.0.

# Adobe and the Spoon Foundation are working together to donate the Flex SDK to an established open source foundation.

# Glyn Moody explained why Barnes & Noble is an open source hero.

# Red Hat added support for Jenkins, Maven and integration with JBoss Tools to its OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service.

# Zend Technologies announced the general availability of Zend Studio 9.0.

# WSO2 updated both the WSO2 Carbon enterprise middleware platform and WSO2 Stratos cloud middleware platform.

# Mozilla published Mozilla Public License Version 2.0, Release Candidate 2.

# DigitalPersona open sourced its new FingerJetFX fingerprint feature extraction technology.

# AquaFold launched AquaClusters.com, a new social collaboration tool for software developers that is free for open source developers.

# Xyratex joined Open Scalable File Systems (OpenSFS) as a formal member.

VC funding for Hadoop and NoSQL tops $350m

451 Research has today published a report looking at the funding being invested in Apache Hadoop- and NoSQL database-related vendors. The full report is available to clients, but non-clients can find a snapshot of the report, along with a graphic representation of the recent up-tick in funding, over at our Too Much Information blog.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.11

B&N asks DoJ to investigate Microsoft patent tactics. Fedora 16. And more.

# Barnes & Noble asked the U.S. Department of Justice to investigate Microsoft’s patent-licensing tactics.

# The team behind Strobe is moving to Facebook. Sproutcore will continue as an independent project.

# The UK government’s Cabinet Office dispelled concerns about the security of open source software.

# The Fedora Project announced the availability of Fedora 16.

# Google offered support to Android firms in lawsuits.

# HStreaming updated its scalable continuous data analytics platform built on Hadoop.

# Dell is releasing its Apache Hadoop Crowbar barclamps as open source software.

# ActiveState added new management and monitoring features to ActiveState Stackato.

# Talend provided information on all contributions made by Talend to open source community projects.

# StackIQ announced the availability of Rocks+ 6.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.08

Cloudera raises $40m. Accel announces $100m fund. Rackspace takes OpenStack private. And more.

# Cloudera raised $40m in series D funding and announced a partnership with NetApp around its NetApp Open Solution for Hadoop.

# Accel Partners launched a $100m Big Data Fund to invest in Hadoop- and NoSQL-related vendors.

# Rackspace launched Rackspace Cloud: Private Edition, based on OpenStack.

# Quest Software released Toad for Cloud Databases – Community Edition.

# Splunk launched Splunk Enterprise for Hadoop to provide integration between Splunk and Apache Hadoop.

# Continuent announced supported MySQL-To-Oracle replication with Tungsten Replicator.

# Hadapt announced early access for Hadapt 1.0, combining Hadoop with relational databases.

# StackIQ announced the immediate availability of Rocks+ 6.

# MapR Technologies and Lucid Imagination announced a strategic partnership.

# Cloudera formed a strategic partnership with Karmasphere.

# EnterpriseDB announced Postgres Plus Connector for Hadoop.

# SCO Group, or what’s left of it, asked the US District Court for the District of Utah to reopen its litigation against IBM.

# Abiquo announced version 2.0 of its self-service cloud configuration and management software.

# Ian Skerrett reported on John Swainson’s key success factors for open source strategies.

# Gorilla Logic announced FoneMonkey for Android,

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.04

Microsoft contributes to Samba. Basho raises another $5m. And more.

# Microsoft contributed code to Samba.

# Basho Technologies raised an additional $5m from existing equity holders and announced a licensing agreement with the Danish Government.

# Actuate reported BIRT license business of $3.0m among total revenue of $33.8m in Q3.

# IBM and Eurotech contributed the Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) protocol to the Eclipse Foundation.

# Informatica and Hortonworks collaborated on the distribution of the Community Edition of Informatica HParser.

# SugarCRM announced the release of Sugar 6.3, a major upgrade to its Community Edition.

# The UK government’s Cabinet Office updated its Open Source Procurement Toolkit.

# Cloudera founder Christophe Bisciglia launched a new company Apache Hadoop-based analytics company called Odiago

# The results for the JCP 2011 Executive Committee election are in.

# Linus Torvalds discussed why Linux is not successful on the desktop.

# Apache Harmony has been now been moved to the Apache Attic.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.01

Appcelerator raises $15m. Hortonworks launches Data Platform. And more.

# Appcelerator raised $15m in a third round led by Mayfield Fund, Translink Capital and Red Hat.

# Modo Labs closed a $4m investment from Storm Ventures and New Magellan Ventures.

# Hortonworks launched its Hortonworks Data Platform Apache Hadoop distribution, as well as a new partner program. Eric Baldeschwieler put the announcements into context.

# Pentaho announced the latest release of Pentaho Business Analytics.

# DataStax announced the general availability of DataStax Enterprise and DataStax Community Edition.

# NYSE Technologies announced that it has open sourced its Middleware Agnostic Messaging Application Programming Interface, now called OpenMAMA.

# Bacula Systems announced the appointment of Frank Barker as its new CEO.

# Florian Effenberger provided an update on the status of the Document Foundation, while Document Foundation founder Charles H. Schultz compared LibreOffice to the Occupy movement and the Arab Spring.

# Oracle proposed the contribution of JavaFX into OpenJDK as a new project called “JFX”.

# Open source graph database provider sones has entered bankruptcy administration.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.28

Sencha raises $15m. Facebook forms Open Compute foundation. And more.

# Sencha raised $15m in series B funding led by Jafco Ventures, previewed its Sencha.io MTML5 cloud platform.

# Facebook announced the formation of a foundation to lead the Open Compute Project, while Red Hat became a member.

# Digium and the Asterisk open source community released Asterisk 10.

# SUSE released an early development snapshot of its OpenStack-powered cloud infrastructure offering.

# Internap Network Services claimed to have launched the world’s first commercially available public cloud compute service based on the OpenStack.

# The Linux Foundation announced the consumer electronics Long Term Stable Kernel Initiative.

# Zmanda and Nexenta Systems announced availability of jointly developed and certified back-up solutions.

# BonitaSoft announced the availability of Bonita Open Solution 5.6.

# Black Duck Software announced version 2.0 of its Code Sight source code search engine.

# CFEngine unveiled CFEngine 3 Nova, a new version of its commercial configuration management software.

# The Hudson-CI team described the steps taken to prepare for membership of the Eclipse Foundation.

# Actuate announced BIRT Mobile Business Intelligence for Android devices.

# Red Hat, The Linux Foundation and Canonical published a white paper on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface.

# Stephen O’Grady responded to suggestions that open source doesn’t innovate.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.25

Microsoft: “more than half your Android devices are belong to us”. And more

# Microsoft claimed that more than half of the world’s ODM industry for Android and Chrome devices is now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio following its agreement with Compal Electronics.

# Hadapt expanded its board of directors and confirmed its $9.5m series A funding round.

# Appcelerator entered into an agreement to acquire the Particle Code mobile gaming and HTML5 development platform.

# Jaspersoft and IBM are working together to combine InfoSphere BigInsights with Jaspersoft’s full BI suite.

# Karmasphere announced its new Hadoop Virtual Appliance for IBM InfoSphere BigInsights.

# Neo Technology launched Spring Data Neo4j 2.0.

# Opscode extended Chef, Hosted Chef and Private Chef to provide infrastructure automation in Windows environments.

# Sourcefire announced plans to support Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization

# Percona added support for MySQL Cluster.

# Avere Systems partnered with Nexenta Systems to combine Avere’s FXT Series of appliances and Nexenta’s NexentaStor open source ZFS technology.

# The Qt project is now up and running.

# Zed A Shaw explained why he has licensed Lamson under the GPL.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.21

Google unwraps Ice Cream Sandwich. Source code to follow. And more.

# Google and Samsung unveiled Galaxy Nexus, the first phone designed for Android 4.0, also known as Ice Cream Sandwich.

# Meanwhile Google indicated that it plans to publish the Ice Cream Sandwich source code soon after it is available on devices.

# BonitaSoft announced that it has surpassed one million downloads and now has more than 250 customers.

# Gemini Technologies joined the OpenStack community, bringing its Amazon S3 compatibility, provisioning and billing APIs to OpenStack.

# Canonical re-aligned its corporate and professional services.

# The Document Foundation announced the preliminary results of its board election.

# Cloudera released CDH3 update 2, adding Apache Mahout to its Cloudera Distribution Including Apache Hadoop.

# Cloudera also announced the new Cloudera University brand for its training and certification programs.

# Zend Technologies announced phpcloud.com and a partnership with 10gen including the integration of the MongoDB PHP driver with Zend Server

# Hadapt reportedly closed an $8m series A financing round – or is that $9.5m

# Bacula Systems announced the availability of its Linux bare metal restore feature.

# Virtustream added support for Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization to its xStream cloud platform

# The Outercurve Foundation announced the acceptance of the .Net Bio project into the Research Accelerators Gallery.

# ForgeRock announced a partnership with Radiant Logic to join RadiantOne’s Virtual Directory Server and OpenAM.

# OStatic published an introduction to Amdatu, an open cloud platform powered by Apache.

# Talend announced an expanded OEM partner program.