The OpenStack Pulse 2014 – new 451 report

We’ve recently updated our coverage of OpenStack with a new report, ‘The OpenStack Pulse 2014.’

The OpenStack project continues to be something of a lightning rod and also something of a dichotomy in the industry. On one hand, it has drawn the involvement of hundreds of supporting vendors and more than 17,000 individual members. It ranks highly among priorities, particularly for private clouds, among 451 Research survey respondents.

Yet critics are quick to point out issues: the continued difficulty of installing and implementing OpenStack; the challenges of pushing it to production and fragmentation — including different vendor objectives and agendas. Despite its downsides, one thing remains clear: OpenStack is a major concern and focus for large enterprises and service providers today.

Read the full article.

451 CAOS Links 2010.05.25

What’s missing from WebM? VoltDB launches. The importance of profitability. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Simon Phipps examined what’s missing from WebM, from an open source perspective.

# Mike Stonebraker’s VoltDB officially launched its open source in-memory OLTP database.

# Jim Whitehurst argued that one of Red Hat’s most valuable contributions to open source is its profitability.

# Infobright appointed former Aleri CEO Don DeLoach as its new president and chief executive.

# Monty Program launched an Unlimited support offering for a company’s entire MySQL/MariaDB estate.

# Red Hat has announced the availability of Fedora 13.

# Terracotta claimed 100 customers have upgraded to the enterprise edition of Ehcache in the last 10 months.

# Stéphane Croisier discussed the future of open source CMS, and the future of open core.

# Pogo Linux released a new line of StorageDirector Z2 Foundation and StorageDirector Z2 HA Cluster products.

# Couchio started testing a hosted CouchDB service.

# A group of implementers of the open source ERP application ADempiere formed ADempiere Business Consultants.

# Simon Phipps argued the case for the continuing relevance of the Open Source Initiative.

# Red Hat’s Paul Cormier disputed Oracle’s open source credentials.

# BitTorrent released an open source implementation of its µTP protocol.

# Microsoft released two new open source projects for interoperability with Outlook.

# Carlo Daffara discussed the limited potential in trying to convert open source users into paying customers.

# When should you use Hadoop? Cloudera’s Jeff Bean offered some suggestions.

# Andrew Oliver argued that for Microsoft, open source means “Windows Encumbered” although without examples.

# While Mark Stone argued in favor of constructive engagement between open source and Microsoft.

# ibatis has become MyBatis and moved from Apache to Google Code.

# Who will build the LAMP cloud? Or does cloud computing need LAMP?

# CIO Update reported on Red Hat’s plans to commercialize deltaCloud.

# Linux trading system to save London Stock Exchange £10m a year, Computerworld reported.

2010 kicks off era of hidden Linux

For something as open as Linux — the open source operating system developed by thousands of individuals and dozens of companies — you wouldn’t think it would be so hidden, but that’s exactly what Linux will be in 2010 and beyond. We’ve already discussed progress for non-desktop Linux and the layered pervasiveness of Linux. Now let’s consider what might happen as Linux quietly finds its way into even more consumer and enterprise use.

The most prominent yet most hidden place this is happening is in embedded devices — which range from consumer electronics such as media players, set-top boxes and televisions to automotive infotainment to industrial control technology to aerospace and military technology. We’ve seen some consolidation and M&A around embedded Linux, particularly the Android OS backed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, with deals such as Intel-Wind River, Mentor Graphics-Embedded Alley and most recently, Cavium Networks-MontaVista. In addition, processor players including ARM Holdings and MIPS Technologies are supporting Android and embedded Linux. Soon behind the current cavalcade of Android-based smartphones hitting the market, we can expect even more various devices running Android and other forms of embedded Linux. What we shouldn’t expect is to see or hear the word ‘Linux’ in any advertising, packaging or campaigning.

Of course, there’s a whole lot more Linux and other open source software in mobile devices today — Android, Nexus One, WebOS, LiMO, Moblin, Ubuntu Netbook Remix and more — but we’re not really hearing or seeing it as ‘mobile Linux.’ Obviously there continues to be some degree of fragmentation, but given Google and the many Android-based devices that continue to come to market, there is also consolidation here, too. Linux may be stronger than it ever has in mobile devices in 2010, but don’t look for Linux by name. It’s unlikely you’ll see it from the handset manufacturers, software vendors, wireless carriers and others who are pushing it.

Next up, there will be much more virtual Linux, particularly in Microsoft and Windows shops that are enjoying greater integration and support of Linux from Redmond. This — along with the growing base of enterprise Linux users leveraging virtualization and additional commercial support from Red Hat, Novell, Canonical and others — will help fuel more virtual Linux traction and growth. However, don’t expect Microsoft to talk too loudly about virtual Linux options and keep in mind we are still, even now in 2010, relatively early on in the enterprise adoption of server virtualization.

Moving on, what better place for Linux to hide inconspicuously than in cloud computing? We’ve covered the significance of community Linux in the enterprise and also community Linux in the clouds. With more support for community software and growing desire to build private and hybrid clouds, Linux (both commercial and community) figures prominently into the equation as a basic, flexible yet scalable building block. The end result is both use of Linux to build cloud infrastructure and availability of Linux in the clouds, even though it is likely to be labeled or branded something other than ‘Linux.’

So while we can expect major market gains and new inroads for Linux, the further the open source OS spreads, the less likely we are to really see how far.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.01.09

Topics for this podcast:

Our commercial open source software outlook for 2009
*Impact of current economic conditions
*Business strategies evolve
*Community open source grows
*What’s next in funding and M&A?

iTunes or direct download (28:45, 6.6 MB)

The ‘other’ value of open source in this economy

We’ve talked recently about how the down economy can be both good and bad for Linux and open source software in general. The more I consider the continued gloomy outlook, the more I am convinced the economic struggle will translate to increased interest, use and adoption for open source software. Part of this is the fact that when fuel is $4-a-gallon, the monthly heating bill tops $150 and you just have to have that expensive wireless data plan, anything that is free is going to get more attention and uptake. Still, the appeal of Linux and other free and open source software in tough times does go deeper than that.

As we watch the global markets skid through an agonizing rough patch, one could argue the lower the value of shares in the market, the higher the value of open source software. Open source is not only a likely alternative for cost-cutting, but which it also benefits from its uniquity from traditional models of value and property. This may even translate through to the vendors that develop, sell and support open source, since rather than sheer economic value, their open source software and development projects and communities, including developers and users, represent potential innovation and opportunity, rather than money in the bank, which at this point has diminished value.

That’s why I believe the value of communities actually serves as a significant differentiator for open source software right now. The value of open source software communities, which has figured into open source M&A activity characterized recently by higher prices because of strategic and longterm value, may be more apparent now. Although it is difficult if not impossible to try to valuate an open source software development community, this other form of value shows how open source can retain its value in good times and in not-so-good times.