The OpenStack Tipping Point – new report

Since its start in the summer of 2010, the OpenStack open source cloud computing project has been the subject of a lot of hype. Today, the technology, backers and use of OpenStack are giving substance to all of that sizzle and skepticism is giving way to service provider and enterprise use cases across the globe. OpenStack is still relatively immature and still requires a high degree of technical aptitude to deploy, but its community continues to grow in both providers and users, both of which are focused on making the software easier to deploy, manage and scale.

*Coming of age
The OpenStack project itself is not even three years old, but thanks to maturing technology, growing membership and the OpenStack Foundation formed last year, OpenStack has matured to the point it is getting attention from large service provider and enterprise users, including companies in telecommunications, retail and research. Large supporters of OpenStack such as Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM and Rackspace are using OpenStack internally and also in new cloud offerings. We also see vitality in the number of startups and smaller players bringing OpenStack to the market, including Cloudscaling, eNovance, Mirantis, Morphlabs, Nebula and Piston Cloud Computing. We’ve also seen large vendors make acquisitions of key OpenStack players, such as Red Hat’s acquisition of scale-out storage specialist Gluster for $136m in October 2011, VMware’s acquisition of open source networking player Nicira for $1.26 billion in July 2012 and Oracle’s acquisition of cloud management vendor Nimbula in March 2013. We have no doubt as the OpenStack technology and market matures, it will present additional acquirers and targets along the way.

The fact that there were already open source cloud computing options in the market when OpenStack was established helped contribute to a discussion of open source software, open standards and open clouds. We expect OpenStack and other open source cloud options, such as CloudStack, Eucalyptus, Joyent and OpenNebula, will continue to co-exist in the market and will all benefit from the increased credibility they all bring to open source cloud computing. Just as different Linux distributions and different open source hypervisors have helped drive one another in the industry, we are likely to see open clouds do the same thing.

*Components mature, emerge
In addition to its foundation and growing support among vendors and implementors, OpenStack is also gaining traction because the technology of the open source project is maturing and advancing. The main OpenStack components for compute (Nova), networking (Quantum) and storage (Swift) are becoming more credible for enterprises and service providers beyond bleeding edge users. Where there are some of the biggest gaps in OpenStack, such as dashboard/UI, identity services, orchestration or metering, additional components and sub-projects are emerging. While OpenStack continues to require a good degree of technical aptitude to deploy, the OpenStack community seems to be scatching the right itches for broader enterprise and service provider use.

OpenStack users have also indicated that although the OpenStack technology may be lacking in certain features and functionality, they appreciate the ability to be part of the community that solves issues and having more control of their own IT destiny.

*OpenStack Drivers
OpenStack is being driven largely by the growing number of enterprise and service provider organizations that want to put more of their operations and offerings in the cloud. Many companies are seeking the scalability and elasticity of public clouds, but desire more control and want private clouds, where OpenStack is finding some traction. this is particularly true for continuous integration and continuous deployment or devops implementations that combine application development and IT operations for greater efficiency and speed. We are seeing two types of adoption of devops: more proactive efforts that center on speed and iteration and more reactive effors that focus on providing IT resources to developers, productivity and business units so they do not go outside the organization for public cloud, free or low-cost options, also known as ‘shadow IT.’

Other OpenStack drivers parallel the advantages we’ve seen for open source software: cost savings, flexibility and avoiding vendor lock-in. OpenStack users have also indicated it has been helpful to be able to access OpenStack source code and customize it for integration with existing infrastructure and systems. We’ve also heard from some OpenStack implementors that their developers and engineers prefer open source tools and frameworks that give more flexibility.

*OpenStack Hurdles
Despite the size and number of OpenStack supporters and vendors, the open source cloud computing software still represents a technical challenge for many organizations. Baseline features and functionality, such as metering and billing, are just now taking shape in OpenStack and while issues are being rapidly addressed, the software is not ready out of the box by an means.

Another challenge with the project and its use among more enterprises and service providers is the fact that OpenStack talent is in short supply. This is one of the biggest challenges of deploying OpenStack and while users may seek third-party help, their options are somewhat limited. This facet of OpenStack is quickly changing with more training and certification efforts in the works as well as a new OpenStack Operations Guide that was published last month.

We at 451 Research have also fielded more inquiries and questions on OpenStack. In response, we’ve published an extensive report on OpenStack available to 451 Research subscribers here.

451 CAOS Links. 2011.12.02

Talend delivers v5. Zentyal raises series A. The TCO of OSS. And more.

# Talend announced version 5 of its data integration suite, adding business process management capabilities via an OEM relationship with BonitaSoft. Yves De Montcheuil explained the name changes in version 5.

# Zentyal closed a series A venture capital funding of over $1m by Open Ocean Capital.

# The London School of Economics released a report on the total cost of ownership of open source software.

# Couchbase announced the availability of the Couchbase Hadoop Connector, developed in conjunction with Cloudera.

# Rackspace announced the private beta of Rackspace MySQL Cloud Database.

# The debate over the role of open source foundations in the Git era continued, including a follow-up by the instigator, Mikael Rogers, a rallying cry for autonomy from Ceki Gülcü, and Simon Phipps warning about throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

# Marco Abis is stepping down as CEO of Sourcesense.

# NGINX usage has grown almost 300% over the last year, according to Netcraft figures discussed by Royal Pingdom.

# The Wireless Innovation Forum announced the formation of the Open Source Framework for Commercial Baseband Software project.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.08

Cloudera raises $40m. Accel announces $100m fund. Rackspace takes OpenStack private. And more.

# Cloudera raised $40m in series D funding and announced a partnership with NetApp around its NetApp Open Solution for Hadoop.

# Accel Partners launched a $100m Big Data Fund to invest in Hadoop- and NoSQL-related vendors.

# Rackspace launched Rackspace Cloud: Private Edition, based on OpenStack.

# Quest Software released Toad for Cloud Databases – Community Edition.

# Splunk launched Splunk Enterprise for Hadoop to provide integration between Splunk and Apache Hadoop.

# Continuent announced supported MySQL-To-Oracle replication with Tungsten Replicator.

# Hadapt announced early access for Hadapt 1.0, combining Hadoop with relational databases.

# StackIQ announced the immediate availability of Rocks+ 6.

# MapR Technologies and Lucid Imagination announced a strategic partnership.

# Cloudera formed a strategic partnership with Karmasphere.

# EnterpriseDB announced Postgres Plus Connector for Hadoop.

# SCO Group, or what’s left of it, asked the US District Court for the District of Utah to reopen its litigation against IBM.

# Abiquo announced version 2.0 of its self-service cloud configuration and management software.

# Ian Skerrett reported on John Swainson’s key success factors for open source strategies.

# Gorilla Logic announced FoneMonkey for Android,

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.10.14

Topics for this podcast:

*Our latest special report on ‘The Changing Linux Landscape’
*Oracle’s Hadoop-based appliance and big-data strategy
*Rackspace’s plan for the OpenStack Foundation
*2011 Q3 funding for open source companies
*Red Hat buys open source storage player Gluster

iTunes or direct download (27:38, 4.7MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.07

OpenStack Foundation. New Pentaho CEO. And more.

# Rackspace announced its intention to form an independent OpenStack Foundation.

# HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system for its Public Cloud.

# Pentaho appointed Quentin Gallivan as its new CEO.

# Hortonworks continued the discussion about contributions to Apache Hadoop.

# Bob Bickel explained why CloudBees is not, itself, open source.

# Google announced the limited preview release of Google Cloud SQL.

# Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges joined the Linux Foundation.

# Dave Neary discussed the different types of community in relation to the Tizen project.

# Akamai joined the OpenStack community.

# Daniel Abadi provided his perspective on Oracle’s NoSQL Database.

# One more thing…
Apple’s relationship with open source may be somewhat tenuous – Paul Rooney provides some background – but given the impact Steve Jobs has made on the industry as a whole it seems wrong not to mark his passing in some way. We’ll leave the words to the company he created.

Canonical, Ubuntu broadening cloud coverage

Whether it’s been our discussion of unpaid, community Linux, the changing Linux landscape or cloud operating systems, we’ve always seen Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux as a major factor in the emerging cloud computing software market.

Canonical was the first Linux provider to so aggressively and prominently target cloud computing by its support and incorporation of the open source Eucalyptus cloud framework more than two years ago.

More recently, Canonical signaled a move with its next version of Ubuntu Server 11.10 will support a different cloud stack, the open source OpenStack software, as its default cloud platform. Eucalyptus will still be included in the Ubuntu distribution and will remain an option, which is key as we see the desire for multiple technologies and choices emerging as increasingly important to customers (the same thing seems to be happening with open source hypervisors Xen and KVM).

Given our coverage of the significance of open source in cloud computing and the importance of openness to customers moving into cloud computing, it is critical for vendors such as Canonical and technologies such as Ubuntu to be flexible in the other technologies and players with which they integrate.

That’s why it was even more impressive to see Canonical strike a deal with VMware. The two announced recently that Ubuntu 11.10 will also feature integration of and support for VMware’s Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS). This is yet another indicator of increased competition between VMware and Red Hat, which has its own version of PaaS in OpenShift. Regardless of the impact to its fellow Linux provider Red Hat, Canonical’s support for CloudFoundry is wise and positions Ubuntu as among the most flexible Linux distributions for cloud computing.

Canonical still faces significant challenges, primarily the monetization of developer, pilot and unpaid Ubuntu use and also its lack of pre-installation on server hardware from major OEMs. Nevertheless, the company manages to set itself apart from all other Linux providers in its continued focus on mobile and converged devices, as well. HP’s abandonment of the space and the idea of synergy between back end servers and mobile devices running the same OS is not much of a validation. However, it could also be an opportunity for Canonical, which is not burdened by the hardware business that became so painful for HP.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.26

Jive Software files for IPO. VMware adds Python and PHP to Cloud Foundry. And more.

# Jive Software filed for a $100m IPO.

# VMware launched the beta availability of Micro Cloud Foundry and announced that ActiveState and AppFog would be adding Python/Django and PHP respectively to the Cloudfoundry.org project.

# Meanwhile Salesforce.com’s Heroku added support for Java.

# Eucalyptus Systems announced the launch of Eucalyptus 3.

# EnterpriseDB announced the general availability of Postgres Enterprise Manager as well as the launch of Postgres Plus Cloud Server.

# MOSAID Technologies has filed a patent infringement complaint against Red Hat, as well as another complaint against IBM, Adobe, Alcatel-Lucent, Juniper Networks, NetApp and VMWare.

# The Outercurve Foundation announced the contribution of the OData Validation project.

# Rackspace Hosting announced the availability of professional training for OpenStack delivered by Rackspace Cloud Builders.

# Brian Proffitt did his research on GPL violations of the Linux kernel and found the sky is not falling.

# The Document Foundation announced the forthcoming election of its board of directors.

# Simon Phipps outlined the seven corporate steps towards software freedom.

# Icinga launched version 1.5 of its Nagios fork.

FLOSSmole has published a comparison of 24 software forges.

Commercial gains and community pains

Recent conversations at OSCON, which I’ve attended since 2004, as well as observations through talks with vendors, users and developers in open source all indicate a common theme: With commercial successes for open source software come some community growing pains. This was also illustrated to some extent by the attendance, content and vibe at this year’s OSCON, a good annual check on where commercial open source software stands in its ongoing maturation, evolution and disruption.

Full article at LinuxInsider

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.08.05

Topics for this podcast:

*Our latest special report, ‘Going Open, Going Closed’
*OpenStack marks one year with commercial success, community concerns
*Couchbase previews fruit of integration, unstructured query language
*OSCON and where we are in enterprise open source
*Vendor-led community projects discussed

iTunes or direct download (35:25, 6.1MB)

The rise, fall and reality of commercial open source

We’ve been writing ourselves about the move toward more permissive licensing in commercial open source, as well as a lessening of the use of ‘open source’ as an identifier or differentiator. We’ve also seen others comment on a perceived loss of significance and importance of free and open source software and open standards. Combine this all with some typical observation on the lack of contribution back to open source software projects, and it might appear that open source software is a once-mighty empire in the midst of decline. However, from my perspective it seems despite all of this, open source software has never before been as pervasive, disruptive and innovative as it is right now. While we have yet to reach open nirvana, open source software is playing a pivotal role in the two most significant software markets currently: cloud computing and mobile computing.

Much of the gloom and doom in open source software the last couple of years has centered on the evil that is ‘open core,’ yet I have been among those contending that open core and the mixing of open source and proprietary models is often something that customers want. In addition, rather than just a matter of converting much or all that open source community goodness to cold hard cash, I believe all of these trends and perspectives support the idea that open source software is actually gaining in significance. Whether it is viewed as an effective marketing mechanism may be another thing, but the fact that open source is prevalent in the two hottest categories of IT today: cloud computing and mobile devices.

We’ve written extensively about open source software’s prevelance in cloud computing. We’ve also covered how the many, critical open source pieces of cloud computing stacks, whether SaaS, IaaS or PaaS, are also having an impact on openness and discussions of it, something we also see when considering recent partnerships and a changing landscape for Linux and open source software.

We’ve also covered the significance and prevalence of open source software in mobile computing. At the same time, we recognized that while open source software was a key ingredient to most if not all mobile software platforms and application ecosystems, there was a lack of open source software reaching end products and users.

In both cases, there are reasons and incentives for ‘going closed,’ so to speak, but it is the true open source efforts that elicit true community benefits: collaboration, transparency, speed, flexibility, security and more. So while open source as a term or identifier may not be what matters most to vendors or customers, there is no question open source is key to the business and future of many, if not most vendors in cloud and mobile computing. Ask Puppet Labs or Chef sponsor Opscode whether open source matters to their customers and their business. Ask Google whether openness is something they consider as they move forward on Android and Chrome. Ask Rackspace whether open source is critical in its open source cloud computing stack, OpenStack. Ask HP whether it is meaningful that WebOS is open source. I have. It is. So the next time we hear about the surrender, retreat, fade or decline of open source software or its importance in today’s computing landscape, just remember that today’s key markets tell a different story.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.06.10

Topics for this podcast:

*eBay wins bid for open source e-commerce player Magento
*Citrix releases its own version of OpenStack
*MapR brings its own Hadoop distribution to market
*IBM builds out its analytics and data stream stories with Hadoop
*The trend toward more permissive licensing
*Why Oracle’s donation of OO.o disappoints

iTunes or direct download (31:26, 5.4MB)

Hypervisor fight good for customers, good for FOSS

There have been many changes in the market and technology since Citrix acquired XenSource and a major stewardship stake in the Xen open source hypervisor four years ago. Red Hat’s 2008 Qumranet acquisition and subsequent push behind the Linux-integrated Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) hypervisor has added to the disruption. One thing, though, remains the same: the intense competition among these open source hypervisors in the enterprise market.

Read the entire article at LinuxInsider.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.04.01

Topics for this podcast:

*Sauce Labs spread Selenium, application testing in the clouds
*Cisco acquires newScale for ITSM, devops, open source
*Hadapt integrates Hadoop with database
*SMB content management vendor KnowledgeTree moves from open source to SaaS
*eXo Platform rolls out latest version of open-source-based portal software
*OpenStack Google walk the line on control and community

iTunes or direct download (28:27, 4.9MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.03.25

Red Hat grows revenue 20%+. Google withholding Honeycomb source code. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Red Hat reported Q4 revenue up 25% to $245m, FY revenue up 22% to $909m

# Google is withholding the source code to Honeycomb for the foreseeable future.

# Rick Clark explained why he left Rackspace amid concerns that the company is exerting too much control over OpenStack.

# DataStax launched Brisk, a Hadoop/Hive distribution built on Apache Cassandra.

# Details emerged about Mapr, which is building a proprietary version of Hadoop.

# Hadapt emerged from stealth mode to commercialize HadoopDB research project.

# Mark Radcliffe said the analysis behind Android GPL violation claim is “fundamentally flawed”.

# OpenLogic partnered with MuleSoft to resell Tcat Server.

# Stephen Walli explained why the Symbian Foundation failed.

# North Bridge and 22 open source leaders launched the fifth annual Future of Open Source Survey.

# Evident Software launched ClearStone 5.0, monitoring Cassandra, Memcached/Membase, and MongoDB. (amongst others).

# Evident Software announced strategic partnerships with Terracotta, EsperTech, Neo Technology, and Cirrus Technologies.

# Black Duck Software announced the availability of Black Duck Suite 6.

# Great Bloomberg interview with Cloudera CEO Mike Olson on open source and big data.

# Continuent updated its Tungsten Enterprise replication and data management offering for MySQL and PostgreSQL.

# Genuitec released MyEclipse Enterprise Workbench and MyEclipse Blue Edition 9.0.

# Tasktop Technologies announced Tasktop Enterprise 2.0, including Task Federation.

New Linux landscape emerging

Recent news that Linux vendor Red Hat is changing the way it releases code, described as ‘obfuscating’ or worse by some FOSS advocates, brings up an important discussion of complying not only wiith the letter of open source software licenses, norms and practices, but complying with the spirit of open source.

However, I’m going to leave that debate to others while I focus on another matter that is highlighted by Red Hat’s recent move: the changing enterprise Linux landscape. Red Hat’s move shows an intensifying competition in the Linux market, with Red Hat seeking to thwart or slow the copying and reselling of its code. It also highlights the change in positioning of Linux distributions, which are expanding beyond a couple of main distributions to a number of other possibilities, driven primarily by virtualization and cloud computing. Of course, there is also an impact from unpaid, community Linux distros, including CentOS, Debian and Ubuntu, as covered in our special report The Rise of Community Linux.

Indications are that the Linux market changes are continuing, with a greater impact from the unpaid community distributions, which are often ideal for stripping out or adding components for various virtualized and cloud computing deployments. Based on customer and vendor conversations, we also see Ubuntu as a much more important Linux distribution in the clouds, compared to the traditional enterprise server market. In fact, most polls and surveys indicate Ubuntu as the top Linux OS used for clouds, including our own. Finally, there is yet another Linux distribution that is not necessarily an ‘official’ Linux, but is certainly well-used in cloud computing: Amazon Linux. While the company does not promote its own Linux version, wide use of Amazon’s Linux AMI are, in effect, Amazon Linux. The same might be said for OpenStack, which is being described by Rackspace and other backers as a ‘cloud operating system.’

Given we have described 2011 as the year of Linux in the clouds, we will be watching closely to see how the market, the use of Linux and the various distributions and their backers continue to evolve. This will also be the focus of a new special report from The 451 Group that is coming soon.

451 CAOS Links 2011.03.08

Digia gets Qt. VMware makes waves. Rackspace launches OpenStack support. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Digia signed an agreement with Nokia to acquire the Qt commercial licensing and services business.

# VMware’s Springsource division acquired Wavemaker.

# Rackspace formally launched services and support for OpenStack via Rackspace Cloud Builders.

# Red Hat defended its move to pre-apply patches to Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

# The Free Software Foundation announced the appointment of John Sullivan as its new executive director.

# OpenLogic scan results show that 71% of Android, iPhone and iPad apps containing OSS failed license requirements.

# Percona announced that it now has over 1,000 customers for its MySQL support and consulting services.

# Acquia announced the general availability of Drupal Gardens 1.0.

# Sencha released a free comparison test suite for developing Android applications.

# Techradar published an interview with David Recordon, Facebook’s head of open source.

# Grid Dynamics’ Cloud Services division is delivering private cloud platforms based on OpenStack.

# Opscode claimed more than 3,000 Opscode Platform sign-ups, previews new services.

The four pillars of modern IT openness

Given our coverage regarding the impact of open source software on cloud computing, development and IT admin trends such as devops and the drivers of open source from the perspective of open source software users and customers, there’s no question open source software is the driving force of openness in today’s enterprise IT. Still, there are other factors emerging as significant. In fact, I see four pillars of openness that are relevant today, each at different stages and with shifting importance, but all with a role in what is or is not open in today’s enterprise IT.

*The first pillar is open source software itself, and it is perhaps the most established and strongest of them all. As referenced above, open source continues to play a growing role in the latest enterprise IT trends, and it is aligned with customer empowerment, which lends credence to the idea it will continue to grow and spread. Open source software and its principles have impacted nearly all discussions of ‘open’ and open source stands as the true measure of openness.

*The second pillar is represented by open standards, which have transformed from somewhat of a joke in open source circles to a more true representation of the term and the words. Rather than a single vendor’s effort to get a technology standard viewed as open, today’s open standards have to really be open. Why? The market no longer accepts open standards that are open in name only. True, there are still plenty of aspects to standards, even open standards, that makes them more closed than open, but the situation has generally improved, and with continuing customer empowerment, vendor collaboration and the influence of open source software driving standards that are truly more open for participation and community. We do wonder what types of standards will be open enough as we push further into cloud computing, devops and other driving trends, but the overall industry movement now seems to be toward openness in standards. It’s not just analysts saying so, either. The market dictates standards arguably more than anything esle, and the market now demands (almost all of the time) they are open.

*A third pillar of openness today is undoubtedly cloud computing, for which open source software and open standards are critical. The prevalence of Linux and a lot of other open source software is also apparent in some of the latest, interesting partnerships and integrations, such as Ubuntu distributor Canonical’s deal with Autonomic Resources for more channel business and Red Hat’s cloud computing pact with Eucalyptus Systems. We also continue to see signs that cloud computing is ‘giving back’ to open source software, primarily by making the separation of free and open source software available for free and for pay clearer via paid services and cloud access.

*The final pillar, and arguably the least evolved and mature, is open data. While open source software (particularly data-centric open source such as Hadoop), open standards and the role of openness in cloud computing have driven discussions of openness, data remains a source of lock-in according to users and a source of demand for closed technology according to users. In considering a concept such as Matt’s ‘total data,’ and some of the points raised in this post, I have no doubt there will be meaningful debates and moves to make data and data access more open in the industry. However, I also believe that the desire to continue to keep customers, the need to keep data closed (including privacy) and the nature of data will make open data the slowest to evolve. Nevertheless, it will eventually give way to the upside of shared data, collaboration, and a global market of not only goods and services, but also ideas. In doing so, open data will likely continue to be a pillar of openness in the modern IT landscape.

We will continue to watch these pillars of openness, and expect the significance of all four to continue as well, given their interconnection and importance to what both IT providers and consumers, particularly the successful ones, are doing today.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.15

Kaltura raises $20m. ForgeRocks acquires ApexIdentity. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Open source video platform vendor Kaltura raised $20m in a new round of funding.

# ForgeRock signed 35 customers in its first year, generated turnover of more than $2m and has acquired ApexIdentity.

# WhiteHouse.gov released its second set of Drupal modules.

# eBay recently confirmed that it owns 49% of open source ecommerce vendor Magento.

# Talend announced the release of Talend Integration Factory, an Apache Camel distribution.

# Rackspace joined the Open Invention Network as a licensee.

# The Hudson project moved to Github.

# Splashtop updated its MeeGo-based Splashtop OS.

# “Nine young Nokia shareholders” plan to challenge the company’s strategy and partnership with Microsoft at next AGM.

# Appcelerator and Engine Yard partnered for scalable mobile application development.

# Open source graph database Neo4j is now available on Windows Azure.

# Canonical made its complete database of certified components for Ubuntu and Linux publicly available.

# Actuate and Talend teamed up on data integration for BIRT onDemand.

# Qualys announced IronBee, an open source project to create a new web application firewall.

# art of defence launched the openWAF project to create a new distributed web application firewall.

# Marvell launched Kinoma an open source platform for digital devices.

# The Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux project released EPEL 6.

# Daniel Kihlberg discussed the future of Qt, following the announcement of Nokia’s new strategic direction.

# The LiMo Foundation announced the launch of LiMo 4.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.11

Nuxeo contributes its Core to Eclipse. Nokia bets its future on Windows Phone. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Nuxeo is contributing its Nuxeo Core content repository technology to the Eclipse Foundation.

# Nokia adopted Windows Phone as smartphone platform, Symbian becomes a franchise platform, MeeGo reserved for market exploration.

# Rackspace acquired Anso Labs, the developer behind NASA’s contribution to OpenStack.

# The Ada Initiative launched to increase participation of women in open technology and culture, including OSS.

# Version 1.0 of the Open Hardware Definition has been released.

# Computerworld outlined the battle Oracle for MySQL support dollars.

# The Eclipse Foundation’s 2011 Board of Director election is now up and running.

# Liferay announced 100% year-over-year growth.

# Red Hat’s Makara Cloud Application Platform is now available on the Rackspace Cloud.

# Qualcomm Innovation Center announced the launch of the AllJoyn open source peer-to-peer framework project.

# Red Hat Enterprise Linux is now available on Fujitsu’s “On-Demand Virtual System Service” public cloud.

# Open Scalable File Systems announced plans to collaborate with Whamcloud and the Lustre community on version 2.1 of Lustre.

Is cloud computing opening up?

We’ve already identified the significance of open source software to cloud computing, based on the cloud stacks from large IaaS, PaaS and other providers, on the most popular projects used for public, private and hybrid clouds and on the traction of key open source pieces such as Linux, Xen, KVM, Apache Tomcat, Hadoop, PHP, Ruby and many others. We’ve also discussed how open source is playing a role not only in the technology, but in the discussions, debates and overall evolution of cloud computing. While we believe the continued use and growth of critical open source pieces in cloud computing will contribute to a more open cloud ecosystem and market, we actually saw some evidence of this recently with word that the next Ubuntu Linux from Canonical will support not only the Eucalyptus cloud framework, but also the ever-popular OpenStack technology, project and community.

We wondered recently about the impact of a cloud partnership between Red Hat and Eucalyptus Systems, which also works closely with Canonical for its Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. In a recent discussion, Marten Mickos told me Eucalyptus Systems fully expects and supports Canonical’s moves toward another cloud framework, OpenStack. While Canonical’s strategy probably has as much to do with customer demand, particularly for cloud flexibility, as it does with responding to rivals’ moves and deals, I believe that both the Red Hat partnership with Eucalyptus Systems and Canonical’s support for multiple, open source cloud computing frameworks signal a more open cloud computing market that is evolving. Customers are prioritizing flexibility and portability, and open source represents both perceived and real mechanisms for providing it. We’ve seen similar support from rival vendors on the operating system and hypervisor, most notably with Red Hat and Microsoft on virtualization, and I expect we’ll see this repeated with other vendors and technologies in cloud computing.

Sure there is still the question of how open is open enough, but the latest activity is truly good news for users of open source software and customers of open source vendors, who will benefit from this cross-project, cross-cloud platform support, collaboration and perhaps, community.