Rise of Polyglot report is out

We recently wrote about a disruptive trend we are following along with cloud computing, devops and open source software in the enterprise. Our 451 Research subscribers also got a preview of our findings in a recent spotlight report.

Polyglot programming is the use of many different languages, frameworks, services, databases and other pieces for individual applications. The trend takes today’s developers and IT shops beyond .NET and Java to node.js, PHP, Python, Ruby, Spring and further still to Erlang, Scala, Haskell and others. Also in the mix are widely used API Web services, such as JSON, REST and SOAP, which are increasingly significant to building applications, as well as developer and user communities. There is also polyglot disruption present at the database layer with MySQL still being popular, but with ample use of the growing number of alternatives (NoSQL, PostgreSQL, NewSQL, etc.), including virtual and cloud-based services. Don’t forget today’s applications will likely pull in effective user-interface technologies such as Javascript, XML and HTML5, whether for internal enterprise, Web, mobile, consumer or converged audiences.

Although there is added pain in programming with multiple languages, benefits such as scalability, interoperability and concurrency increasingly necessitate it for optimal efficiency and quality.

Now we are pleased to present our latest special report, ‘The Rise of Polyglot Programming.’ The report investigates the drivers, disruption, challenges and opportunities from the trend. We also present market sizing and growth implications for polyglot programming, drawing on data and analysis from our Market Monitor service to show how polyglot programming will be part of a growing opportunity worth more than $35bn by 2015.

Open APIs are the new open source

We’ve seen the rise of open source software in the enterprise and also beyond the IT industry, but the real keys to openness and its advantages in today’s technology world — where efficient use of cloud computing and supporting services are paramount — exist in open application programming interfaces, or APIs.

Open source software continues to be a critical part of software development, systems administration, IT operations and more, but much of the action in leveraging modern cloud computing and services-based infrastructures centers on APIs. Open APIs are the new open source.

Read the full story at LinuxInsider.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.05.27

Topics for this podcast:

*Smaller PaaS players unite with DotCloud-Duostack deal
*Typesafe taps Scala, Akka, open source and devops
*Changes continue at Continuent
*Future of Open Source Survey debrief
*Changes afoot at the OSI
*Microsoft moves to support CentOS Linux

iTunes or direct download (32:15, 5.5MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.13

Google orders an Ice Cream Sandwich, hold the Honeycomb. Funding for WSO2 and Typesafe. And more.

# Google introduced Ice Cream Sandwich, attempted to defend the non-release of the source code for Honeycomb, and announced the launch of the Chromebook

# WSO2 closed $6.5m in growth financing provided by Quest Software and Intel Capital.

# Typesafe, formed to build a commercial company behind the Scala programming language, launched with $3m-backing from Greylock Partners.

# Yahoo won a jury verdict that it does not infringe a Linux-related patent.

# Canonical and Ubuntu developers decided to focus solely on OpenStack as the foundation for Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud.

# Mark Webbink provided his impressions of Oracle vs Google.

# Matt Asay encouraged Oracle to hurry up and embrace Hadoop.

# Talend became a sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation.

Canonical has reportedly joined the GENIVI Alliance and is creating a GENIVI-compliant Ubuntu IVI Remix.

# The Outercurve Foundation added a sixth project to its ASP.NET gallery.

# Openbravo claimed over two million downloads of its open source ERP software.

# Qt Labs provided a progress update on Qt 5.

# Royal Pingdom provided a list of the top 20 Linux desktop strongholds.

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.18

Funding for OpenGamma. Riptano becomes OpenStax. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# OpenGamma raised $6m series B funding.

# Apache Cassandra-supporter Riptano changed its name to DataStax and has added 50 customers in 6 months.

# WANdisco acquired the SVNForum.org Subversion user community.

# Univa hired the principal engineers from the Grid Engine team, will publish a Univa version of Grid Engine before the end of Q1.

# Internap Network Services launched Internap XIPCloud Storage, based on OpenStack.

# Talend appointed Ross Turk as its senior director of community.

# Foursquare released two open source development tools.

# The GNOME Foundation is looking for a new executive director.

# We are buying open source but are we engaging, asked Ross Gardler.

# The Economist reviewed some recent research on open source software that disputes conventional wisdom.

# Nexenta Systems joined the Open Invention Network as a licensee.

# The Scala research group announced that they won a 5 year European Research Grant of over 2.3m euros.

# Henrik Ingo offered a reminder, via Mark Schonewille, of how the GPL applies to MySQL use cases.

# Bertrand Delacretaz explained how the Apache Foundation delivers sustainable open source innovation.