451 Take on Red Hat-CentOS

There was a somewhat quiet, cost-free acquisition of sorts in the Linux world earlier this year when Red Hat announced it was joining forces with Red Hat Enterprise Linux community clone CentOS. The move, which effectively brings organization, governance, backing and technology of CentOS under Red Hat’s brim, is interesting for a few reasons.

First, it illustrates the continued presence and power of unpaid community Linux distributions like CentOS. Second, it’s part of the changing Linux market, which is being driven by cloud computing and new types of uses on the rise. Third, it also may be a sign that open source software users and customers are exerting more influence than ever before.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

Open source ushers mobile OS changes

The year is starting out with what may turn out to be significant changes in the mobile operating system market, with open source software playing a significant role just as it has in enterprise software, virtualization and cloud computing.

With fading heavyweights and interesting new challengers, there are changes afoot in the mobile OS market, but we must first acknowledge the market today is still mainly a duopoly of Apple with iOS and Samsung with Android.

However, if we look back five years, we see how dramatically the mobile OS landscape has changed. Given the pace of today’s device and application development and support, as well as users from consumers to the enterprise, we can expect similarly dramatic changes in the coming months and years.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

Microsoft hearts Linux, just not Red Hat

Just when you thought it couldn’t top itself — having contributed Linux kernel code under the GPL, broadly supported Linux alongside Windows with its systems management and other software, and spun off a new subsidiary dedicated to openness, Microsoft showed yet more Linux and open source love recently, adding an impressive Linux lineup to supported software on its Azure cloud.

However, there’s one major Linux player that’s sort of getting left out of the love-fest. It’s enterprise Linux leader Red Hat and its Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), which has to sit by while other distributions, including RHEL community clone CentOS and market competitors SUSE and Ubuntu, get first-class treatment in Microsoft’s Azure cloud.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

Reading between the lines of the Linux contributor list

The recently released Who Writes Linux kernel contributor list reveals that some of the usual supporters of Linux — Red Hat, SUSE, IBM, Intel, Oracle — remain firmly behind the open source OS.

There has also been a lot of attention on the other contributors, which now include Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT). What I find most fascinating about the Linux contributor list — beyond the increasing rate of code change with some 10,000 patches from 1,000 developers representing 200 companies in each quarterly kernel release — are the contributors that show some new direction and potential for Linux, in this case the processor players.

Whenever the Linux contributor report comes out, there is also typically some focus on those that use the Linux kernel code but do not necessarily appear among its list of core contributors.

One of the most frequent names to come up in this regard is Canonical, backer of the popular Ubuntu distribution.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

Ubuntu on the move more than in decline

Ubuntu has been taking some criticism and heat for its falling Distrowatch rankings. I don’t doubt that after years of popularity, we’re finally seeing a bit of a return to the desktop Linux world of old when a new distribution shot up every week or month, then faded, then re-appeared … and so on. However, when I consider where Canonical and Ubuntu are heading, I question the significance of desktop OS standing and Distrowach rankings.

First off, I must say that Ubuntu’s slip off the ‘king of the hill’ game on Distrowatch came at the expense of Linux Mint, another polished, user-friendly Linux. It wouldn’t surprise me if some Ubuntu users may be migrating to Mint or other distributions largely out of frustration or dislike of the new Unity interface over the previous primary interface, Gnome. However, I think the move will be worth it in the long run to Ubuntu, as I’ll explain further.

If considering desktop OS, the most important aspect to me as an enterprise software analyst is enterprise desktop, and Ubuntu does well there. I’m sure there are plenty of shops running other flavors of Linux, including Mint, Gentoo, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Debian and many, many others, but for corporate desktop, the list quickly thins. Nevertheless, this is where Canonical has had some big victories, including the French police. In terms of consumer and user desktop PCs, the category itself is disappearing into converged and touch-capable devices, further distancing us from the ‘distro wars’ of the past.

Still, the server is where the real action and revenue from Linux exist. Here, Ubuntu still faces a role-reversal from most Linux distributions, using desktop and developer popularity to fuel its use as a server OS, which is also helped by free availability and cloud computing. Ubuntu continues to benefit from its early move to cloud computing and its popularity among developers, but also still faces a huge challenge in monetizing use. Significantly, the latest version, Ubuntu 11.10, incorporates support for OpenStack (or Eucalyptus) and VMware Cloud Foundry PaaS. This could be significant given what we’ve seen from this type of integration and bundling in the past. In addition, Ubuntu benefits from being among the select few Linux distribution that exist in both free, community and paid, commercial form. As reported in our special report, ‘The Changing Linux Landscape,’ the existence of an unpaid community cousin can help drive commercial growth for paid, subscription Linux, as we’ve seen happen with free Ubuntu and paid Ubuntu, as well as Fedora and RHEL and OpenSUSE and SLES.

Finally, the explosion of smartphones, tablets and converged devices — many of them running embedded Linux — makes clear there is more opportunity in these newer devices than in the desktop PCs of old. Ubuntu got a good start in netbooks and continues to be among the most advanced netbook operating systems. This should help its move to smartphones, tablets, other mobile devices, TVs and more and this is where the payoff of Unity occurs. Canonical with Ubuntu may have a real advantage as a user-friendly, mobile Linux OS that can be used by OEMs and carriers without the intellectual property stress that has marked Android, which has nonetheless laid the groundwork for mobile Linux in the industry. In the end, the pain of leaving Gnome has been significant, but the promise of where Ubuntu is headed seems worth that pain.

451 CAOS Links 2011.11.23

Red Hat’s Ceylon makes its debut. Heroku launches PostgreSQL service. And more.

# Red Hat’s Ceylon programming language made its public debut. Mark Little provided some context.

# Heroku announced the launch of Heroku Postgres as a standalone service.

# GitHub co-founder Tom Preston-Werner explained why you should open source (almost) everything.

# Mikeal Rogers discussed the issues behind the Apache Software Foundation’s slow response to the Git era.

# Royal Pingdom explored recent trends in Linux distribution popularity, pondering the rise of Linux Mint and the decline of Ubuntu.

# Canonical is dropping CouchDB from Ubuntu One.

# ActiveState announced that Stackato Micro Cloud will continue to be free of charge for developers to use as their own private Platform-as-a-Service.

# The European Space Agency wants to publish more of its software using open source licences.

# Sourceforge provided some interesting statistics on operating system usage.

Our view on the Changing Linux Landscape is out

We are pleased to present our latest CAOS special report, ‘The Changing Linux Landscape.’ This latest in our series of long-format reports takes a more in depth look at the Linux server market and how cloud computing, competition and the confluence of application development and IT operations known as devops are all affecting it.

Basically, we still see commercial vendors Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) leading the market, but there are significant changes afoot, ushered in by cloud computing, wide use of other distributions such as Ubuntu, and continued use of unpaid community Linux such as CentOS and Debian. In addition, other distributions such Oracle Enterprise Linux continue to evolve and grow, as do the providers of Linux support, which now includes Microsoft. These additional competitors and choices, along with the new way of developing and deploying enterprise applications known as ‘devops,’ are all driving and disrupting the Linux server market.

This means challenges and opportunities – particularly in PaaS, which embodies devops practices – for both vendors and users. The report focuses on market dynamics with competitive analysis of leading Linux distributions, analysis of adoption drivers and hurdles, and customer case studies highlighting how Linux is put to work in today’s cloud computing environments.

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.07

OpenStack Foundation. New Pentaho CEO. And more.

# Rackspace announced its intention to form an independent OpenStack Foundation.

# HP has chosen Ubuntu as the lead host and guest operating system for its Public Cloud.

# Pentaho appointed Quentin Gallivan as its new CEO.

# Hortonworks continued the discussion about contributions to Apache Hadoop.

# Bob Bickel explained why CloudBees is not, itself, open source.

# Google announced the limited preview release of Google Cloud SQL.

# Eucalyptus Systems, Nebula and Virtual Bridges joined the Linux Foundation.

# Dave Neary discussed the different types of community in relation to the Tizen project.

# Akamai joined the OpenStack community.

# Daniel Abadi provided his perspective on Oracle’s NoSQL Database.

# One more thing…
Apple’s relationship with open source may be somewhat tenuous – Paul Rooney provides some background – but given the impact Steve Jobs has made on the industry as a whole it seems wrong not to mark his passing in some way. We’ll leave the words to the company he created.

Canonical, Ubuntu broadening cloud coverage

Whether it’s been our discussion of unpaid, community Linux, the changing Linux landscape or cloud operating systems, we’ve always seen Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux as a major factor in the emerging cloud computing software market.

Canonical was the first Linux provider to so aggressively and prominently target cloud computing by its support and incorporation of the open source Eucalyptus cloud framework more than two years ago.

More recently, Canonical signaled a move with its next version of Ubuntu Server 11.10 will support a different cloud stack, the open source OpenStack software, as its default cloud platform. Eucalyptus will still be included in the Ubuntu distribution and will remain an option, which is key as we see the desire for multiple technologies and choices emerging as increasingly important to customers (the same thing seems to be happening with open source hypervisors Xen and KVM).

Given our coverage of the significance of open source in cloud computing and the importance of openness to customers moving into cloud computing, it is critical for vendors such as Canonical and technologies such as Ubuntu to be flexible in the other technologies and players with which they integrate.

That’s why it was even more impressive to see Canonical strike a deal with VMware. The two announced recently that Ubuntu 11.10 will also feature integration of and support for VMware’s Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS). This is yet another indicator of increased competition between VMware and Red Hat, which has its own version of PaaS in OpenShift. Regardless of the impact to its fellow Linux provider Red Hat, Canonical’s support for CloudFoundry is wise and positions Ubuntu as among the most flexible Linux distributions for cloud computing.

Canonical still faces significant challenges, primarily the monetization of developer, pilot and unpaid Ubuntu use and also its lack of pre-installation on server hardware from major OEMs. Nevertheless, the company manages to set itself apart from all other Linux providers in its continued focus on mobile and converged devices, as well. HP’s abandonment of the space and the idea of synergy between back end servers and mobile devices running the same OS is not much of a validation. However, it could also be an opportunity for Canonical, which is not burdened by the hardware business that became so painful for HP.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.19

New funding for OpenLogic. Ubuntu adopts Cloud Foundry. And more.

# OpenLogic secured $2m in new funding and converted existing bridge financing, partly to finance its recently released CloudSwing PaaS software.

# Canonical announced that Ubuntu 11.10 will include VMware’s Cloud Foundry PaaS software.

# Red Hat announced the release of the beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.0.

# Black Duck Software’s Black Duck Suite supports the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) Version 1 open source standard.

# SkySQL partnered with Sphinx Search to resell and distribute annual support subscriptions for the Sphinx Search Server.

# Hortonworks discussed the issue of data integrity and availability in Apache Hadoop.

# The OpenSFS Lustre community group has contracted Lustre services firm Whamcloud to add new functionality.

# Bradley M Kuhn provided some interesting insight into the history of the Symbian Foundation.

# The Linux Foundation produced a graphic illustration of 20 years of Linus.

# Stefano Maffulli became OpenStack’s new community manager.

# Geeks Without Frontiers released open source mesh WiFi network software.

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.12

Citrix acquires Cloud.com. Funding for Piston and Zettaset. And more.

# Citrix acquired Cloud.com, reportedly for $200m-$250m.

# Piston Cloud Computing raised $4.5m to fund its efforts to commercialize OpenStack.

# GOTO Metrics re-launched as Zettaset with a Hadoop-based data management platform and $3m in funding.

# Red Hat launched JBoss Application Server 7

# The Document Foundation provided an update on its efforts to establish as legal entity.

# Google’s rivals have been accused of colluding against Android.

# Carlo Daffara explained how it could have been so different.

# Opengear hired Rick Stevenson as CEO.

# rPath announced the launch of its OpenStack Compute Appliance.

# DataStax launched version 1.2 of DataStax OpsCenter for Apache Cassandra and Hadoop.

# Facebook banned Open-Xchange’s OX.IO export tool.

# Nuxeo announced that Nuxeo Document Management is available in the Ubuntu software partner catalog.

# Richard Fontana continued his explanation of the problem with the Harmony project.

# Debian and SFLC published patent advice for community distributions.

# Mandriva appointed a new president of its executive board.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.14

Apache OpenOffice.org proposal approved. SkySQL Tekes new funding. And more.

# The proposal for OpenOffice.org to become an Apache incubator project was unanimously approved.

# Rob Weir discussed how the relationship between OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice need not be a zero-sum game.

# Simon Phipps offered his thoughts on the potential positive and negative outcomes.

# Tekes, the main public funding agency for research, development, and innovation in Finland, awarded SkySQL a grant of €250,000 and a loan of over €600,000.

# Opscode announced the general availability of Opscode Hosted Chef, formerly the Opscode Platform, and launched the Private Chef appliance.

# Infobright launched version 4.0 of its open source analytic database.

# Glyn Moody questioned whether we still need the FSF, GNU and the GPL.

# Cenatic published its analysis of the criteria for adopting open source software in public administrations.

# Nuxeo and Hippo announced a technology alliance through which they have built an ECM/WCM connector based on the OASIS CMIS standard.

# The VAR Guy wondered whether Canonical’s Ubuntu focus is too diverse.

# Sandro Groganz discussed what US-based open source vendors need to know about Europe.

# The Xen code for Dom0 has been accepted into the Linux mainline kernel.

# Brian Proffitt covered the two faces of UK open source.

# The VAR Guy encouraged Adobe to engage more with open source.

# Matt Asay pondered Red Hat’s potential to challenge Oracle with a database of its own.

451 CAOS Links 2011.06.03

Reaction to Apache OpenOffice proposal. The rise of Github. And more.

Apache OpenOffice proposal
# Oracle confirmed that it had proposed that OpenOffice.org become an Apache Incubator project (as initially reported by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols). The project will be backed by IBM, which is providing the staff resources.

# IBM representatives, including Bob Sutor, Ed Brill and Rob Weir discussed the positive aspects of the move while Bradley M Kuhn declared it an ” insidious attack” on the LibreOffice despite noting that the ultimate long-term outcome is likely to be all positive for LibreOffice.

# Meanwhile Jay Lyman offered a perspective from The 451 Group, including disappointment that Oracle didn’t move quicker, while Ian Skerrett discussed why open source an ideology don’t necessarily mix.

# The Document Foundation, meanwhile, indicated that the announcement impact was neutral on the LibreOffice project, but did state that would welcome the reuniting of the OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice projects and was willing to start talking with Apache Software Foundation. ASF president Jim Jagielski discussed the next steps for OpenOffice.org as a potential incubator project. Additionally, The Document Foundation announced LibreOffice 3.4.0.

The best of the rest
# Github is now the most popular open source forge, according to data released by Black Duck Software.

# Pedro Côrte-Real published research that indicates GNU makes up about 8% of GNU/Linux.

# Heroku added Node.js support to the Celadon Cedar release of its PaaS platform.

# Nuxeo updated its Nuxeo Document Management and Nuxeo Enterprise Platform products.

# Andrew Katz asked ‘Why does the UK Government need to own the copyright in software it has developed?’

# O’Reilly Radar published an interview with former White House deputy CTO Andrew McLaughlin on the Civic Commons local government code sharing initiative.

# Open Ocean launched a “start-up pitch” competition for would-be European open source start-ups.

# MapR Technologies announced its intention to contribute some of its Hadoop modifications to the Apache project.

# Matt Asay argued that no one is ‘morally obligated’ to give back to open source.

# Canonical launched its Ubuntu-Ready hardware certification.

# The Mageia community announced the first release of its fork of Mandriva Linux.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.13

Google orders an Ice Cream Sandwich, hold the Honeycomb. Funding for WSO2 and Typesafe. And more.

# Google introduced Ice Cream Sandwich, attempted to defend the non-release of the source code for Honeycomb, and announced the launch of the Chromebook

# WSO2 closed $6.5m in growth financing provided by Quest Software and Intel Capital.

# Typesafe, formed to build a commercial company behind the Scala programming language, launched with $3m-backing from Greylock Partners.

# Yahoo won a jury verdict that it does not infringe a Linux-related patent.

# Canonical and Ubuntu developers decided to focus solely on OpenStack as the foundation for Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud.

# Mark Webbink provided his impressions of Oracle vs Google.

# Matt Asay encouraged Oracle to hurry up and embrace Hadoop.

# Talend became a sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation.

Canonical has reportedly joined the GENIVI Alliance and is creating a GENIVI-compliant Ubuntu IVI Remix.

# The Outercurve Foundation added a sixth project to its ASP.NET gallery.

# Openbravo claimed over two million downloads of its open source ERP software.

# Qt Labs provided a progress update on Qt 5.

# Royal Pingdom provided a list of the top 20 Linux desktop strongholds.

451 CAOS Links 2011.05.03

Novell sold to Attachmate. Barnes & Noble throws the book at Microsoft. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Novell closed its acquisition by Attachmate and its patent sale to CPTN.

# Attachmate’s CEO discussed the company’s plans for SUSE Linux.

# Barnes & Noble accused Microsoft of misusing its patents to undermine Android.

# Acquia increased its revenue 300% in the first quarter compared to last year.

# Actuate announced Q1 BIRT-related license revenue of $6.1m, total revenue $32.1m.

# Google lost a Linux-related patent suit.

# Yahoo is reportedly considering spinning off its Hadoop-related interests in a new company.

# OpenStack launched Project Red Dwarf, its database-as-a-service incubator project.

# CloudBees announced RUN@cloud Private Edition for OpenStack and vSphere.

# Nokia announced that it is outsourcing its Symbian software-related activities, including 3,000 employees, to Accenture. Meanwhile, it appears that Nokia is one of the most active Android contributors.

# Puppet Labs announced its Faces API and relicensed Puppet to Apache 2.0.

# OpenGamma announced the first public release of its technology stack.

# German Insurance company LVM Versicherung is converting 10,000 corporate desktops to Ubuntu.

# Sandro Groganz discussed the distribution model for open source-related software vendors.

# Google launched a WebM video patent cross-licensing initiative.

# Liferay is offering a special bundled version of Liferay Portal Enterprise Edition preinstalled with MuleSoft Tcat Server.

A new SUSE Linux, separate from Novell

I’m currently researching and writing about the changing Linux and operating system landscape, which is being impacted by cloud computing, additional competitors and devops, as well as the ongoing impact of unpaid, community Linux distributions such as CentOS and Ubuntu.

Another one of the changes underway is what’s happening with SUSE Linux, largely considered the second-leading enterprise distribution behind Red Hat Enterprise Linux, which has undergone some uncertainty thanks to the Attachmate deal to purchase the distribution and separate it from Novell.

To continue the strong SLES development and address this uncertainty, it was good to see recently extended support for SLES to provide greater assurance to the community and customers. We’ve also mentioned before the credit due to Attachmate for communicating its intentions on OpenSUSE –important since both RHEL and SLES are bolstered, particularly in cloud computing in my opinion, by their unpaid, community cousins: Fedora and OpenSUSE. We would note we also continue to see strong support for Fedora community, development and openness from Red Hat.

Given we have wondered in the past about whether the SUSE Linux technology and business (including OpenSUSE) would have more opportunity separate from Novell’s other business in networking, identity management and collaboration, it will be interesting to see what happens. Will a dedicated SLES focus lead to ore market traction? Will it accelerate the promotion and use of SLES and/or OpenSUSE in cloud computing, where open source continues to be significant? Will the contribution to the Linux kernel from SUSE and OpenSUSE continue? Will there be another sale of SUSE Linux? Perhaps, but it looks more and more like we’ll see an independent SUSE Linux operating out of its home town of Nuremberg, Germany. And while I continue to see and sense some degree of uncertainty around SUSE Linux, I am also getting reports that there is still good loyalty to the SUSE Linux brand, technology and community.

Given the changes afoot in the Linux and operating system space, the change in ownership of SUSE is a relatively minor disruption. How well SUSE Linux, OpenSUSE and their supporters are able to tap into the driving trends of cloud computing and devops will be much more significant to the users and future of SUSE Linux, as well as any other version of the open source OS.

New Linux landscape emerging

Recent news that Linux vendor Red Hat is changing the way it releases code, described as ‘obfuscating’ or worse by some FOSS advocates, brings up an important discussion of complying not only wiith the letter of open source software licenses, norms and practices, but complying with the spirit of open source.

However, I’m going to leave that debate to others while I focus on another matter that is highlighted by Red Hat’s recent move: the changing enterprise Linux landscape. Red Hat’s move shows an intensifying competition in the Linux market, with Red Hat seeking to thwart or slow the copying and reselling of its code. It also highlights the change in positioning of Linux distributions, which are expanding beyond a couple of main distributions to a number of other possibilities, driven primarily by virtualization and cloud computing. Of course, there is also an impact from unpaid, community Linux distros, including CentOS, Debian and Ubuntu, as covered in our special report The Rise of Community Linux.

Indications are that the Linux market changes are continuing, with a greater impact from the unpaid community distributions, which are often ideal for stripping out or adding components for various virtualized and cloud computing deployments. Based on customer and vendor conversations, we also see Ubuntu as a much more important Linux distribution in the clouds, compared to the traditional enterprise server market. In fact, most polls and surveys indicate Ubuntu as the top Linux OS used for clouds, including our own. Finally, there is yet another Linux distribution that is not necessarily an ‘official’ Linux, but is certainly well-used in cloud computing: Amazon Linux. While the company does not promote its own Linux version, wide use of Amazon’s Linux AMI are, in effect, Amazon Linux. The same might be said for OpenStack, which is being described by Rackspace and other backers as a ‘cloud operating system.’

Given we have described 2011 as the year of Linux in the clouds, we will be watching closely to see how the market, the use of Linux and the various distributions and their backers continue to evolve. This will also be the focus of a new special report from The 451 Group that is coming soon.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.11

Novell-Attachmate deal delayed. Microsoft re-thinks Marketplace license demands. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Novell’s sale to Attachmate has been delayed until at least April 12, due to concerns related to patent sale.

# Microsoft said it will allow EPL and MPL applications on its Marketplace app store.

# Savio Rodrigues discussed open source and app stores – where they mix and where they don’t.

# Clustercorp raised $3m from Anthem Venture Partners and Avalon Ventures.

# Red Hat released JBoss Enterprise SOA Platform 5.1.

# SourceForge quietly released its underlying code under the Apache license.

# Cfengine and C12G Labs partnered on automatic creation and management of virtualized data center and cloud environments.

# HP CEO said every PC shipped by HP starting next year will include WebOS, as well as Windows.

# Ingres launched SkySafe, a new cloud-based managed database service.

# Ubuntu Netbook Edition is being folded into Ubuntu.

# Panasonic joined the Linux Foundation.

The four pillars of modern IT openness

Given our coverage regarding the impact of open source software on cloud computing, development and IT admin trends such as devops and the drivers of open source from the perspective of open source software users and customers, there’s no question open source software is the driving force of openness in today’s enterprise IT. Still, there are other factors emerging as significant. In fact, I see four pillars of openness that are relevant today, each at different stages and with shifting importance, but all with a role in what is or is not open in today’s enterprise IT.

*The first pillar is open source software itself, and it is perhaps the most established and strongest of them all. As referenced above, open source continues to play a growing role in the latest enterprise IT trends, and it is aligned with customer empowerment, which lends credence to the idea it will continue to grow and spread. Open source software and its principles have impacted nearly all discussions of ‘open’ and open source stands as the true measure of openness.

*The second pillar is represented by open standards, which have transformed from somewhat of a joke in open source circles to a more true representation of the term and the words. Rather than a single vendor’s effort to get a technology standard viewed as open, today’s open standards have to really be open. Why? The market no longer accepts open standards that are open in name only. True, there are still plenty of aspects to standards, even open standards, that makes them more closed than open, but the situation has generally improved, and with continuing customer empowerment, vendor collaboration and the influence of open source software driving standards that are truly more open for participation and community. We do wonder what types of standards will be open enough as we push further into cloud computing, devops and other driving trends, but the overall industry movement now seems to be toward openness in standards. It’s not just analysts saying so, either. The market dictates standards arguably more than anything esle, and the market now demands (almost all of the time) they are open.

*A third pillar of openness today is undoubtedly cloud computing, for which open source software and open standards are critical. The prevalence of Linux and a lot of other open source software is also apparent in some of the latest, interesting partnerships and integrations, such as Ubuntu distributor Canonical’s deal with Autonomic Resources for more channel business and Red Hat’s cloud computing pact with Eucalyptus Systems. We also continue to see signs that cloud computing is ‘giving back’ to open source software, primarily by making the separation of free and open source software available for free and for pay clearer via paid services and cloud access.

*The final pillar, and arguably the least evolved and mature, is open data. While open source software (particularly data-centric open source such as Hadoop), open standards and the role of openness in cloud computing have driven discussions of openness, data remains a source of lock-in according to users and a source of demand for closed technology according to users. In considering a concept such as Matt’s ‘total data,’ and some of the points raised in this post, I have no doubt there will be meaningful debates and moves to make data and data access more open in the industry. However, I also believe that the desire to continue to keep customers, the need to keep data closed (including privacy) and the nature of data will make open data the slowest to evolve. Nevertheless, it will eventually give way to the upside of shared data, collaboration, and a global market of not only goods and services, but also ideas. In doing so, open data will likely continue to be a pillar of openness in the modern IT landscape.

We will continue to watch these pillars of openness, and expect the significance of all four to continue as well, given their interconnection and importance to what both IT providers and consumers, particularly the successful ones, are doing today.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.15

Kaltura raises $20m. ForgeRocks acquires ApexIdentity. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Open source video platform vendor Kaltura raised $20m in a new round of funding.

# ForgeRock signed 35 customers in its first year, generated turnover of more than $2m and has acquired ApexIdentity.

# WhiteHouse.gov released its second set of Drupal modules.

# eBay recently confirmed that it owns 49% of open source ecommerce vendor Magento.

# Talend announced the release of Talend Integration Factory, an Apache Camel distribution.

# Rackspace joined the Open Invention Network as a licensee.

# The Hudson project moved to Github.

# Splashtop updated its MeeGo-based Splashtop OS.

# “Nine young Nokia shareholders” plan to challenge the company’s strategy and partnership with Microsoft at next AGM.

# Appcelerator and Engine Yard partnered for scalable mobile application development.

# Open source graph database Neo4j is now available on Windows Azure.

# Canonical made its complete database of certified components for Ubuntu and Linux publicly available.

# Actuate and Talend teamed up on data integration for BIRT onDemand.

# Qualys announced IronBee, an open source project to create a new web application firewall.

# art of defence launched the openWAF project to create a new distributed web application firewall.

# Marvell launched Kinoma an open source platform for digital devices.

# The Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux project released EPEL 6.

# Daniel Kihlberg discussed the future of Qt, following the announcement of Nokia’s new strategic direction.

# The LiMo Foundation announced the launch of LiMo 4.