CAOS Theory Podcast 2012.08.17

Topics for this podcast:

*Red Hat puts enterprise cred and bet on OpenStack
*LexisNexis touts open source benefits of Hadoop alternative
*Who doesn’t love Hadoop?
*Proprietary vendors siding with open source
*PostgreSQL and its cloud, commercial opportunity
*Our Hosting and Cloud Transormation Summit NA event

iTunes or direct download (32:24, 5.8MB)

OSS support grows among proprietary players

VMware continued its embrace of open source software with its recent acquisition of open source and virtual network provider Nicira. The move continued VMware’s aggressive M&A strategy and its effort to transition from proprietary software and virtualization to a broader market and cloud computing, largely through open source software.

With previous open source software acquisitions that have included Rabbit Technologies’ RabbitMQ messaging, Zimbra email and collaboration and SpringSource, VMware seems to have found it paramount to participate and integrate with open source software technology and communities, despite its heritage as a strictly proprietary virtualization vendor.

VMware continues to back and sell mostly proprietary software and products, but its broader engagement of open source also highlights how nearly all vendors in today’s market are, at least to some extent, users or purveyors of open source software. We’ve also seen examples of how the vendors that resist open source are likely to find themselves isolated from vibrant communities if they stick to a closed technology approach.

Read the full article at LinuxInsider.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2012.06.22

Topics for this podcast:

*Sauce Labs grows with fast Selenium application testing
*MySQL, NoSQL, NewSQL survey results and analysis
*Microsoft’s Linux love leaves out Red Hat
*Hadoop roundup with Cloudera, Hortonworks and VMware
*2012 Future of Open Source Survey highlights

iTunes or direct download (28:28, 5.1MB)

CAOS Theory Podcast 2012.04.20

Topics for this podcast:

*OpenStack, Amazon, Eucalyptus and Citrix engage in open cloud warfare
*Microsoft spins off new company for openness
*Updates on automation players Puppet Labs and Opscode with Chef
*Percona turns attention to MySQL high availability
*Open APIs as the fifth pillar of modern IT openness

iTunes or direct download (28:42, 4.9MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.10.14

Dennis Ritchie RIP. Microsoft adopts Hadoop. And more.

# Dennis Ritchie, creator of C and co-creator of Unix, died aged 70. This article from Joe Brockmeier puts his influence into perspective.

# Microsoft announced plans to team up with Hortonworks and the Apache Hadoop community to create a distribution of Hadoop for Windows Server and Windows Azure.

# Hortonworks explained why it decided to work with Microsoft to support its Hadoop plans.

# Black Duck Software closed a $12m round of financing led by new investor Split Rock Partners.

# OpenOffice.org e.V pleaded for financial support for the OpenOffice.org project, prompting a statement of clarification from the Apache Software Foundation

# Microsoft noted that The Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) Working Group confirmed the availability of the AMQP 1.0 specification. Red Hat confirmed its support.

# Red Hat updated its JBoss Enterprise SOA Platform, JBoss Enterprise Data Services Platform and JBoss Enterprise Business Rules Management System product lines.

# Cloudera announced an integration partnership with MicroStrategy.

# Monsanto is creating is data integration and visualization platform based on the Cloudant suite.

# Samba can now accept code from corporations.

# VMware Micro Cloud Factory now includes PostgreSQL and RabbitMQ.

# Univa announced StackIQ will market, sell and support Univa Grid Engine to its customer and reseller channels.

# Openwave Systems is going to integrate Open-Xchange’s email technology into the Openwave Rich Mail product.

# X.commerce, a new business at eBay combining PayPal and Magento, joined the OpenStack community.

Got open source cloud storage? Red Hat buys Gluster

Red Hat’s $136m acquisition of open source storage vendor Gluster marks Red Hat’s biggest buy since JBoss and starts the fourth quarter with a very intersting deal. The acquisition is definitely good for Red Hat since it bolsters its Cloud Forms IaaS and OpenShift PaaS technology and strategy with storage, which is often the starting point for enterprise and service provider cloud computing deployments. The acquisition also gives Red Hat another weapon in its fight against VMware, Microsoft and others, including OpenStack, of which Gluster is a member (more on that further down). The deal is also good for Gluster given the sizeable price Red Hat is paying for the provider of open source, software-based, scale-out storage for unstructured data and also as validation of both open source and software in today’s IT and cloud computing storage.

This is exactly the kind of disruption we’ve been seeing and expecting as Linux vendors compete with new rivals in virtualization, cloud computing and different layers of the stack, including storage (VMware, Microsoft, OpenStack, Oracle, Amazon and others), as covered in our recent special report, The Changing Linux Landscape.

While the deal makes perfect sense for both Red Hat and for Gluster, it also has implications for the white hot open source cloud computing project OpenStack. There was no mention of OpenStack in Red Hat’s FAQ on the deal, but there was a reference to ongoing support for Gluster partners, of which there are many fellow OpenStack members. OpenStack was also highlighted among Gluster’s key open standards participation along with the Linux Foundation and Red Hat-led Open Virtualization Alliance oriented around KVM. Sources at both Gluster and Red Hat, which point to OpenStack support being bundled into Red Hat’s coming Fedora 16, also reiterated to me Red Hat is indeed planning to continue involvement with OpenStack around the Gluster technologies. I suspect Red Hat is looking to leverage Gluster more for its own purposes than for OpenStack’s, but I must also acknowledge Red Hat’s understanding of the value of openness, community and compatibility. Taking that idea a step further, Gluster may represent a way that Red Hat can integrate with and tap into the OpenStack community by blending it with its own community around Fedora, RHEL, JBoss, RHEV and Cloud Forms and OpenShift.

The deal also leads many to wonder whether or what may be next for Red Hat in terms of acquisition. We’ve long thought database and data management technologies were areas where we might see Red Hat building out. This was also the subject of renewed rumors recently, and we believe it might still be an attractive piece for Red Hat given the open source opportunities and targets around NoSQL technologies such as Apache Hadoop distributed data management framework and Cassandra distributed database management software. We’ve also believed systems management to be a potential place for Red Hat to further expand. Given its need to largely stay within open source, we would expect targets in this area to include GroundWork Open Source, which joins Linux and Windows systmes in its monitorig and management, and Zenoss, which works with Cisco and Red Hat rival VMware in monitoring and managing systems with its open source software. Another potential target that would increase Red Hat’s depth in open source virtualization and cloud computing is Convirture, which might also be an avenue for Red Hat to reach out to midmarket and SMB customers and channel players. Red Hat was among the non-OpenStack members we listed as potential acquirers when considering the M&A possibilities (451 subscribers) out of OpenStack.

Given its recent quarterly earnings report and topping the $1 billion annual revenue mark, Red Hat seems again to be bucking the bad economy. We’ve written before in 2008 and more recently how bad economic conditions can be good for open source software. Red Hat is atop the list of open source vendors that suffer as traditional, enterprise IT customers such as banks freeze spending or worse, fail. However, the company’s deal for Gluster is yet another sign it is thriving and expanding despite economic difficulty and uncertainty.

You don’t have to just look at Red Hat’s earnings or take our word for it. On Jim Cramer’s ‘Mad Money’ this week, we heard Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst praised for Red Hat performance and traction where most companies and many economists are throwing the blame: financial services, government and Europe. Cramer credited Red Hat for a ‘spectacular quarter’ and allowed Whitehurst to tout the benefits of the Gluster technology and acquisition, particularly Gluster’s software-based storage technology that matches cloud computing. It was quite a contrast to the news out of Oracle Open World, where hardware was a focal point.

Canonical, Ubuntu broadening cloud coverage

Whether it’s been our discussion of unpaid, community Linux, the changing Linux landscape or cloud operating systems, we’ve always seen Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux as a major factor in the emerging cloud computing software market.

Canonical was the first Linux provider to so aggressively and prominently target cloud computing by its support and incorporation of the open source Eucalyptus cloud framework more than two years ago.

More recently, Canonical signaled a move with its next version of Ubuntu Server 11.10 will support a different cloud stack, the open source OpenStack software, as its default cloud platform. Eucalyptus will still be included in the Ubuntu distribution and will remain an option, which is key as we see the desire for multiple technologies and choices emerging as increasingly important to customers (the same thing seems to be happening with open source hypervisors Xen and KVM).

Given our coverage of the significance of open source in cloud computing and the importance of openness to customers moving into cloud computing, it is critical for vendors such as Canonical and technologies such as Ubuntu to be flexible in the other technologies and players with which they integrate.

That’s why it was even more impressive to see Canonical strike a deal with VMware. The two announced recently that Ubuntu 11.10 will also feature integration of and support for VMware’s Cloud Foundry platform-as-a-service (PaaS). This is yet another indicator of increased competition between VMware and Red Hat, which has its own version of PaaS in OpenShift. Regardless of the impact to its fellow Linux provider Red Hat, Canonical’s support for CloudFoundry is wise and positions Ubuntu as among the most flexible Linux distributions for cloud computing.

Canonical still faces significant challenges, primarily the monetization of developer, pilot and unpaid Ubuntu use and also its lack of pre-installation on server hardware from major OEMs. Nevertheless, the company manages to set itself apart from all other Linux providers in its continued focus on mobile and converged devices, as well. HP’s abandonment of the space and the idea of synergy between back end servers and mobile devices running the same OS is not much of a validation. However, it could also be an opportunity for Canonical, which is not burdened by the hardware business that became so painful for HP.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.31

MapR and Funambol raise funding. VMware virtually supports PostgreSQL. And more.

# MapR raised $20m series B for its Hadoop distribution from Redpoint Ventures, Lightspeed Venture Partners and NEA.

# Funambol raised $3m in funding from previous investors HIG Ventures, Pacven Walden Ventures and Nexit Infocom.

# VMware launched vFabric Postgres as part of vFabric Data Director database-as-a-service launch.

# Citrix released a new edition of CloudStack, making the whole cloud management product available using the GNU GPLv3.

# Yahoo has contributed 84% of Apache Hadoop lines of code and 72% of patches, according to Hortonworks’ analysis.

# Red Hat invited Red Hat Enterprise Linux users to help discuss features for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

# Talend announced that Peter Gyenes has joined its Board of Directors.

# Mandriva announced the release of Mandriva 2011.

# The Document Foundation announced the release of version LibreOffice 3.4.3, intended for enterprise deployments.

# Zmanda announced the availability of Zmanda Cloud Backup (ZCB) 4.0.

# The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against on SCO’s appeal that it, and not Novell, owned the Unix copyrights.

# Oracle retired its licence for distributing its Java with Linux.

# Bruce Byfield wrote an interesting article on how Linus Torvalds and other open source developers avoid burnout.

451 CAOS Links 2011.08.26

Jive Software files for IPO. VMware adds Python and PHP to Cloud Foundry. And more.

# Jive Software filed for a $100m IPO.

# VMware launched the beta availability of Micro Cloud Foundry and announced that ActiveState and AppFog would be adding Python/Django and PHP respectively to the Cloudfoundry.org project.

# Meanwhile Salesforce.com’s Heroku added support for Java.

# Eucalyptus Systems announced the launch of Eucalyptus 3.

# EnterpriseDB announced the general availability of Postgres Enterprise Manager as well as the launch of Postgres Plus Cloud Server.

# MOSAID Technologies has filed a patent infringement complaint against Red Hat, as well as another complaint against IBM, Adobe, Alcatel-Lucent, Juniper Networks, NetApp and VMWare.

# The Outercurve Foundation announced the contribution of the OData Validation project.

# Rackspace Hosting announced the availability of professional training for OpenStack delivered by Rackspace Cloud Builders.

# Brian Proffitt did his research on GPL violations of the Linux kernel and found the sky is not falling.

# The Document Foundation announced the forthcoming election of its board of directors.

# Simon Phipps outlined the seven corporate steps towards software freedom.

# Icinga launched version 1.5 of its Nagios fork.

FLOSSmole has published a comparison of 24 software forges.

Going Open, Going Closed: best practices and lessons learned

The 451 Group’s CAOS practice last week published its latest long format report: Going Open, Going Closed.

The report is the latest in a series from the 451 CAOS practice examining the impact of open source on business strategies. As previously indicated, it takes a look at a number of vendors that have successfully ‘gone open’, including WANdisco, JetBrains, SAP, Intuit, and VMware.

It also tracks the progress (or lack thereof) of the vendors profiled in our 2007 Going Open report, including Covalent, Hyperic, Ingres, Intalio, Jaspersoft, Laszlo Systems, Openclovis and Qlusters.

Finally, it also takes a look at vendors that have walked away from, or at least decreased their engagement with, open source licensing and development projects, investigating the reasons why they failed to gain the expected benefits from open source – or open source failed to meet their requirements.

The vendors that fall under this category include Calpont, GroundWork, KnowledgeTree, Symbian and SnapLogic. To be clear with regard to the report’s title , we would consider all of the following vendors to still be ‘open’ to some degree. As the report explains, however, they are not as open as, perhaps, they once were.

The report also includes more in-depth analysis of themes discussed in recent blog posts, such as the decline of ‘open source’ as an identifying differentiator, and the commercial open source window of opportunity, as well as a list of the best practices for software vendors considering an open source move and the lessons learned from those vendors that have had less successful engagements with open source licensing.

Our key findings:

  • The trend of closed source companies adopting open source software licensing and development methods has continued apace since our previous report.
  • Contrary to our initial expectations, however, there have been relatively few business-model shifts in the years following the publication of that report.
  • At the same time, there has been an explosion in the amount of M&A activity involving open-source-related vendors.
  • There is also a small but growing list of vendors that have backed away from open source licensing and development strategies, opting instead for ‘shared source,’ ‘freemium’ or SaaS-based approaches.
  • The fact that closed source vendors are not dependent on directly monetizing open source software gives them the freedom to relax control and encourage community through more permissive strategies.
  • Going open is not an either/or option for most companies, but a matter of applying the benefits of open source to their advantage while retaining an established closed source business, where appropriate.
  • While early approaches to going open were based on new vendors exploiting licensing to disrupt the existing market, we have also seen the emergence of approaches that involve incumbent vendors maintaining the status quo and avoiding disruption.
  • Shifting an entire business model to take advantage of open source licensing and development is a difficult process that is not to be taken lightly.
  • By comparison, it is easier for existing vendors to acquire vendor-led open source projects, engage with an existing foundation, or encourage open source development that complements their closed source software.
  • Open source is not a panacea. This is true of closed source vendors trying to reinvigorate a distressed product, but also of specialist vendors building a business around an open source project.
  • Strategies for ‘going open’ have become more nuanced as both closed source vendors and open source specialists have come to better understand the benefits and limitations of open source.

The overall conclusion is that ‘going open’ is a complicated and difficult process that requires concerted effort and an understanding of best practices, as well as the lessons learned from companies ‘going closed.’ Overall, the report presents an impartial overview of the strengths and weaknesses of open source strategies, the successes to replicate and the mistakes to avoid.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.07.08

Topics for this podcast:

*Numerous vendors pursuing PaaS
*Update on MongoDB vendor 10gen
*Structure Conference and Future of Cloud Survey
*LexisNexis open sources its platform amid Hadoop
*Decline of differentiation from open source
*Open source shows staying power in cloud, mobile

iTunes or direct download (30:01, 5.1MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.07.01

A herd of Hadoop announcements. Rockmelt raises $30m. And more.

A herd of Hadoop announcements
# Yahoo! and Benchmark Capital confirmed the formation of Hortonworks, an independent company focused on the development and support of Apache Hadoop.

# Cloudera announced the availability of Cloudera Enterprise 3.5 and the launch of Cloudera SCM Express, based on the new Service and Configuration Manager in Cloudera Enterprise 3.5.

# MapR announced the availability of the M3 and M5 editions of its Distribution for Apache Hadoop.

# Platform Computing announced it has signed the Apache Corporate Contributor License Agreement allowing the company to contribute to the Apache Hadoop project, and launched its Platform MapReduce runtime engine.

# Platfora is another new company hoping to make its mark with Hadoop.

# Karmasphere launched the Karmasphere Studio Community Hadoop Virtual Appliance for developers.

# StackIQ announced the beta release of Rocks+ Big Data, a cluster automation offering for Apache Hadoop.

The best of the rest
# Rockmelt raised $30m in a series B funding round led by Accel Partners, Khosla Ventures and existing investor Andreessen Horowitz.

# BeyondTrust acquired Likewise Software’s Likewise Enterprise and Likewise Open products, re-branding them as PowerBroker Identity Services, Enterprise and Open Edition, leaving Likewise focusing on its open source-based Likewise Storage Services product.

# Basho Technologies named Donald J. Rippert, former chief technology officer of Accenture, as president and chief executive officer and closed the remainder of its previously announced funding round.

# Matt Asay compared VMware and Red Hat’s approaches to open source PaaS.

# Miguel de Icaza provided an update on the formation of Xamarin.

# Jaspersoft CEO Brian Gentile suggested that it is a sin to use open source software without contributing money or time, prompting a predictable response from Pentaho inviting guilt-free use of its offerings.

# EnterpriseDB announced the general availability of Postgres Plus Advanced Server 9.0.

# CASH Music highlighted the problems faced by open source groups filing for federal 501(c)(3) non-profit status.

# Microsoft signed Android-related patent deals with Onkyo and Velocity Micro.

# Talend announced that its announced that MDM Enterprise Edition, open source Master Data Management software can now handle more than 100 million records on a single $1200 server.

# Shadow-Soft signed a deal with SkySQL enabling it to resell SkySQL products, training and services in the U.S.

Hypervisor fight good for customers, good for FOSS

There have been many changes in the market and technology since Citrix acquired XenSource and a major stewardship stake in the Xen open source hypervisor four years ago. Red Hat’s 2008 Qumranet acquisition and subsequent push behind the Linux-integrated Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) hypervisor has added to the disruption. One thing, though, remains the same: the intense competition among these open source hypervisors in the enterprise market.

Read the entire article at LinuxInsider.

CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.05.13

Topics for this podcast:

*Watching for possible devops deals
*New technology, offerings highlight Hadoop
*Oracle proposes Hudson as Eclipse project
*Red Hat’s latest IaaS and PaaS
*Defining open source
*Big changes in the Linux and open source landscape
*451 Group at OSBC 2011 in San Francisco

iTunes or direct download (36:17, 6.2MB)

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.21

DoJ/FCO says aye CPTN. Canonical readies Ubuntu 11.04. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Novell-CPTN patent sale agreed by DoJ/FCO, subject to the patents being licensed to OIN.

# VMware reported net income of $126m in Q1 on revenue up 33% to $844m.

# Canonical previewed Ubuntu 11.04, featuring Unity and also Ubuntu Server 11.04.

# The Open Invention Network added 70 new licensees in Q1.

# Brian Aker provided his perspective on the current state of the MySQL ecosystem.

# WANdisco introduced UberSVN, an ALM platform for Subversion.

# Karmasphere updated its Analyst product for Hadoop to version 1.3.

# SkySQL announced the creation of regional Customer Advisory Boards in the Americas, Europe, and APAC.

# Oracle released NetBeans IDE 7.0.

451 CAOS Links 2011.04.15

VMware launches Cloud Foundry. Red Hat heads for Ceylon. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# VMware launched Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-service and open source project.

# Red Hat’s Gavin King revealed details of the company’s Ceylon project.

# Red Hat submitted a number of specification requests for Java EE 7.

# Terracotta accused Red Hat of “trying to pull a fast one” with its data cache JSR.

# Zencoder, the company behind the open source VideoJS viewer, raised $2m in funding.

# OpenStack distribution provider Midokura raised $1.3m in seed funding.

# 10gen’s MongoDB is a core data service in VMware’s Cloud Foundry (along with MySQL and Redis).

# Tuxera has merged the NTFS-3G and ntfsprogs projects, creating its new Tuxera NTFS Community Edition.

# Nuxeo released a Google Search Appliance plugin.

# Opsview updated its Opsview Enterprise open source IT monitoring software.

# Joe Brockmeier presented six public relations lessons for open source projects.

# Couchbase spun off its CouchDB hosting business as Iris Couch.

# Neo Technology explained why Neo4j Community (now at version 1.3) is now GPLv3.

# SkySQL introduced a reference architecture for deploying MySQL or MariaDB databases.

# Jive Software acquired Proximal Labs.

# Gluster Virtual Storage Appliances now support KVM and Xen.

# Talend’s Ross Turk shared his perspective on balancing open core and community.

# Percona announced its roadmap for Percona Server and XtraBackup.

# Support for Flock browsers will be discontinued as of April 26th, 2011.

DevOps and PaaS, yes, but now No-Ops?

We continue to closely watch the devops trend, with some new offerings and new nomenclature, but also validation of our contentions this would begin washing over more mainstream enterprise IT.

Some of the most recent discussion of devops is coming in context of VMware’s Cloud Foundry announcement and offering, an open source PaaS that gives developers another option for building, testing and deploying cloud applications and services. While I do believe Cloud Foundry and VMware’s decision to opt for an open path in PaaS is further evidence that cloud computing may be opening up.

Based on some of the initial Twitterverse reaction to Cloud Foundry, it is also further evidence that devops is contending with another term that has emerged in the discussion of deploying applications in and among today’s cloud computing resources and environments: ‘no-ops.’ The idea is that infrastructure – servers, storage and network — as well as its configuration and maintenance are so automated, there is really no need for the ‘ops’ or system administration part of devops. However, in the larger picture and in the long run, particularly at greater scale, there is undoubtedly need for system administrators. One of the bottom line findings of my research on devops is that the trend is very much about a dramatically changed purpose and role for system administrators, who are typically freed up of mundane OS maintenance and other tasks, but who must also embrace openness and transparency in their operations and scripts, which can be very foreign. While no-ops may be one way to respond to developers cries of ‘give us root,’ I believe that devops with the ops is required for a successful approach. That ops part may indeed be handed off to someone else, and the options and ability to do so have never been greater — again thanks mostly to readily-available cloud resources and infrastructure. Another perspective on devops is that it is bringing some of the agile and automated practices and procedures of software development into the datacenter and operations team, which have previously been focused on their own scripts and stability above all else.

So when I’m asked does devops mean devs doing more ops? Is it ops doing more dev? I say this: devops is the confluence of roles and duties among both software developers and IT operations professionals — many of whom are increasingly working in both jobs at various points or together in their careers. No-ops may emerge as a preferred option as organizations use and grow confidence in various PaaS offerings, as well as more openness in the clouds in general, perhaps. Still, I think that the ops folks still have a tremendous role to play, and I wonder about the PaaS innovation that will be possible when we see the same style of collaboration and communication in operations that we have had on the development side, in large part because of open source, an example being Facebook’s recent move to open up on its datacenters.

451 CAOS Links 2011.03.08

Digia gets Qt. VMware makes waves. Rackspace launches OpenStack support. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# Digia signed an agreement with Nokia to acquire the Qt commercial licensing and services business.

# VMware’s Springsource division acquired Wavemaker.

# Rackspace formally launched services and support for OpenStack via Rackspace Cloud Builders.

# Red Hat defended its move to pre-apply patches to Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

# The Free Software Foundation announced the appointment of John Sullivan as its new executive director.

# OpenLogic scan results show that 71% of Android, iPhone and iPad apps containing OSS failed license requirements.

# Percona announced that it now has over 1,000 customers for its MySQL support and consulting services.

# Acquia announced the general availability of Drupal Gardens 1.0.

# Sencha released a free comparison test suite for developing Android applications.

# Techradar published an interview with David Recordon, Facebook’s head of open source.

# Grid Dynamics’ Cloud Services division is delivering private cloud platforms based on OpenStack.

# Opscode claimed more than 3,000 Opscode Platform sign-ups, previews new services.

451 CAOS Links 2011.02.08

NoSQL vendors merge to form Couchbase. Funding for Basho and EnterpriseDB. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# NoSQL vendors CouchOne and Membase merged to form Couchbase, create open source distributed document database.

# EnterpriseDB increased its most recent fundraising round from $7.5m to $13.6m.

# Basho Technologies raised $7.5m in series D funding, as Danish IT company Trifork acquired an 8% stake in the company and became the European distributor for Riak.

# The FSF and the OSI responded to the DOJ’s request for more info on the Novell/CPTN patent deal.

# Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud is now available to the US federal government via Autonomic Resources.

# Gluster announced Gluster Virtual Storage Appliances for VMware and Amazon Web Services.

# Jaspersoft and SugarCRM announced a number of BI features available integrated with SugarCRM Pro or Enterprise.

# Novell is bundling SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability (HA) Extension with select HP systems.

# MuleSoft announced a private beta program for a new integration platform as a service called Mule iON.

# Actuate generated over $21.2m in BIRT-related business in 2010, bringing the total in the last 4 years to over $62.5m.

# Tuxera joined the Linux Foundation.

# Mandriva joined the Open Invention Network as licensee.

# Whamcloud entered into a partnership with Bull to accelerate the development of Lustre.

# VMware released Zimbra 7.

# DotNetNuke claimed to have tripled its customer base since the end of 2009 to over 1,000.

# Eric Baldeschwieler presented the backstory of Yahoo and Hadoop.

# Groklaw reported that UnXis has been selected as the buyer for the software product business of The SCO Group.

# Jason van Zyl maintained that Hudson has a bright future under Oracle, with Sonatype’s support.

451 CAOS Links 2011.01.25

VMware grows 41%. Evidence of Java infringement disputed. And more.

Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
“Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

# VMware announced full year revenue growth of 41% to $2.9bn.

# Alleged evidence of infringing Java code in Android disputed.

# Oracle nominated SouJava, the Brazilian Java User Group, to a seat in the JCP Executive Committee.

# The Document Foundation launched LibreOffice 3.3.

# JasperSoft released over a dozen connectors as part of its Big Data Reporting project.

# Actuate updated its BIRT onDemand service.

# Bob Gourley assessed when to pick HBase, rather than MySQL.

# Dell joined the SUSE Appliance Program.

# Talend grew its customer base to 2.000 by the end of 2010, up from 1,000 the previous year.